AHI_Newsletter Winter Spring 2016 FINAL

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health WINTER / SPRING EDITION Stakeholders NEWSLETTER

Events and Media

P3

AHI Programme Updates

P6

CellCheck • BVD • Beef HealthCheck Johne’s Disease • IBR Parasite Control • Biosecurity

Focus on TWG Members

P5

James O’Shaughnessy Sharon Verner

Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27 Phone 071 9671928 Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27 Phone 071 9671928 Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie

CONTENTS

4 6

Introduction

Events And Media

14 15 16 19 20 22 22

Focus on Technical Working Group Members

CellCheck

BVD

Johne’s Disease

Beef HealthCheck

IBR

BioSecurity

Introduction

CEO, Animal Health Ireland: Joe O’Flatherty.

The CellCheck award ceremony, which took place late last year, was a fantastic opportunity to take stock of the great strides that have been made by the Irish dairy industry in continually raising milk quality standards. As Finola McCoy reports below, the 2015 data from the Somatic Cell Count (SCC) database show that, between 2014 and 2015, the proportion of herds with an annual average SCC of less than 200,000 cells/mL increased from 50% to 60%, and the proportion of the national milk pool meeting this standard increased from 55% to 64%. These are significant improvements, which leave the programme well on course to achieve its objective – that 75% of the milk supplied by Irish farmers will have an SCC of 200,000 cells/mL or less by the year 2020. As impressive as these statistics are, what really comes across to anyone attending the CellCheck Awards is the enormous pride which Irish dairy farmers take in the business of food production, and what keen competition there is amongst the very best performers to secure a place in the coveted Best 500. The national BVD eradication programme, which entered the fifth year of the compulsory phase of the programme at the start of 2017, continues to make strong progress. The headline figures for 2016 were that the animal level prevalence fell to 0.17%, a reduction of almost 50% compared to 2015, when 0.33% of calves were identified as PI. At the herd level, the prevalence of herds containing one or more calves with a positive or inconclusive result also fell significantly – from 5.9% in 2015 to 3.2% last year. David Graham’s report below provides detailed information on a number of aspects of the programme, including the key messages for farmers on the various enhancements that have been put in place for 2017, and the good progress that is being made in bedding down the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH). Early indications for 2017 are that disease prevalence continues to fall at animal and herd level. Don’t forget that you can follow progress of the BVD eradication programme week-by-week from the AHI website click here. On Johne’s disease, negotiations continue with stakeholders on developing a successor to the pilot programme, which ran from 2014 to 2016. I hope to be able to report real progress in this regard in the near future, following an important meeting of the JD Implementation Group, which takes place in mid-March. On the Beef HealthCheck programme, space doesn’t permit me to go into detail in this edition of the newsletter, but I highly recommend that readers take a look at the report from Rebecca Carroll on the roll-out of this innovative and well-received programme – there will be much more to say on this front in the coming months.

PAGE 4

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Introduction

I would like to extend my very best wishes and thanks to Andy Forbes, who stepped down as Chairman of the Parasite Control Technical Working Group late last year. AHI is indeed disappointed to be losing such an able and committed Chairman, but very grateful to Andy for the considerable progress that was made by the TWG under his stewardship. Andy stands aside, leaving the group in very good stead, with a very sound platform of resources on which to build for the future. The most recent work with which the TWG has been engaged – the production of a paper on Neospora and a guide for vets providing farm-specific advice on parasite control, will shortly be published by AHI. Other retirees from Technical Working Groups in the recent past include John Fagan (CalfCare TWG), Paul Crosson (CalfCare TWG), Tim Geraghty (Biosecurity TWG) and Maura Langan (Parasite Control TWG). I would like to thanks each of these colleagues most sincerely for the contribution which they made to the work of the various working groups in which they participated.

PAGE 5

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media

Communications and Event Manager: Gráinne Dwyer

Beef HealthCheck Farmer Events 5 Beef HealthCheck events, jointly organised by AHI, MII and Teagasc, were attended by 800 farmers over the month of October. The MII representatives were Andrew Clarke (Foyle Foods), Maria Kilmartin (ABP Food Group) and Kelly Stephenson (Dawn Meats). AHI was represented by Gráinne Dwyer and Rebeccca Carroll, and Teagasc by Aidan Murray. All events were Knowledge Transfer (KT) approved for beef discussion groups. Under the theme of Animal Health at Housing, four topics were addressed by the speakers- pneumonia, parasite control, anti-microbial resistance (AMR) and the use of Beef HealthCheck reports. Each presentation was 10 minutes in duration with a further 10 minutes allocated for discussion and Q&A. As a result of the success of this initial series, further similar events are planned for the summer of 2017.

Kieran O’Mahony, Vet (Speaker), Paul Matthews (ABP), Rebecca Carroll, AHI (Speaker), Denis Healy, DAFM (Speaker), John Donworth (Teagasc), Ian Hogan, DAFM (Speaker) with Derek O’Donoghue, College Principal, Pallaskenry Agricultural College who kindly hosted the Beef HealthCheck event.

PAGE 6

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media: Beef HealthCheck

Aidan Murray, Teagasc, Emma Russell from Foyle Meats with her baby daughter and Andrew Clarke also of Foyle Meats attending the Beef HealthCheck event in Donegal.

Eoin Ryan, CRVL, Backweston speaking at the Beef HealthCheck event in Clonee.

PAGE 7

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media: Beef HealthCheck

Caroline Garvan, DAFM speaking at the Beef HealthCheck event in Gorey on Anti Microbial Resistance.

Michael Bergin Vet, showing farmers liver fluke infection at the Beef HealthCheck event in Gorey.

PAGE 8

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards The CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards ceremony was held in the Lyrath Hotel, Kilkenny on the 24th of November. Among the 700 attendees were the Best500 winners, their partners and industry representatives. Data from the 2015 winners confirms the great improvements that continue to be seen nationally, with the highest level of SCC of the best 500 coming in at no more than approximately 87,000 cells/mL. The CellCheck plaques were sponsored by FBD with Ornua, the Irish Farmers’ Journal and AHI sponsoring the Awards ceremony. It was a night to celebrate the great achievements of the individual winners, whose pride in producing milk of the very highest quality was clearly evident.

A selection of images of winners and Coop Representatives from the CellCheck Milking For Quality Award Ceremony held in Kilkenny.

PAGE 9

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media: CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

PAGE 10

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media: CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

PAGE 11

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media: CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

PAGE 12

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Events and Media: AHI

AHI Training CellCheck Service Provider Training

54 people participated in four CellCheck training sessions, held in November, to facilitate advisors and other service providers wishing to become involved in the delivery of the CellCheck Farmer Workshops under the Dairy KT programme.

Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager presenting at the CellCheck Stage 2 training in Fermoy.

Johne’s disease information events As part of AHI’s communications programme for 2016, three information events were held in early December for advisors working in the dairy industry. The events provided participants with basic information on the disease and on pilot control programme. It is envisaged that further information events will be held in 2017, subject to agreement by stakeholders on a successor to the pilot programme, which came to a close in December 2016.

PAGE 13

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Focus on Technical Working Group Members

Name: James O’Shaughnessy Profession: Research Officer, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine TWG Membership: Parasite Control Technical Working Group

James is a native of Co. Limerick and he graduated as a veterinary surgeon from University College Dublin (UCD) in 2000. After graduation, James spent eight years working as a farm animal vet in veterinary practices based in Limerick and in Tipperary. In 2008, he moved to the UK to work in farm animal practice for two years on the Cheshire/Wrexham border. In late 2010, he returned to Ireland to enrol as a postgraduate student in UCD and was subsequently awarded a PhD. Much of the focus of his PhD was on targeted selective anthelmintic treatments in cattle. After working in the UCD School of Veterinary Medicine as a Teaching Fellow in 2015, he joined the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine in 2016 as a Research Officer. At present, he is also enrolled as a resident with the European Veterinary Parasitology College.

Name: Sharon Verner Profession: Programme Manager, Animal Health and Welfare, Northern Ireland TWG Membership: IBR and BVD Technical Working Groups

Sharon Verner is Programme Manager for Animal Health and Welfare Northern Ireland with responsibility for the Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD) Eradication Programme.  Sharon holds a degree in veterinary medicine from the University of Cambridge.  Previously she has led on the technical side of animal health programmes in government veterinary service. Hermost recent rolewasmanagement of the Brucellosis eradication scheme in DAERA which resulted in NI gaining Officially Brucellosis Free status in 2015.  Prior to that, Sharon led the BSE-driven Over Thirty Month Rule Change project that ultimately enabled meat from older cattle to enter the food chain.  She has also spent several years in the field, conducting disease investigations andmanagement of infectious disease breakdowns, (including Foot andMouth Disease, TB and Brucellosis), carrying out on-farm clinical work and as a veterinary adviser for a veterinary pharmaceutical company.

PAGE 14

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update CellCheck

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

Programme Manager: Finola McCoy

A key activity this quarter has been the commencementof thedeliveryof CellCheckFarmer Workshops for Dairy Knowledge Transfer programme participants. Approximately 115 workshops have been delivered tomore than 1,700 Dairy KT participants since October ’16. Group facilitators, with the support of teams of CellCheck regional coordinators and AHI staff are responsible for arranging a workshop for each of their dairy discussion groups. Stage 2 CellCheck training has also been identified as a CPD requirement for all KT group facilitators, and 4 additional training days were held in November to support this. With the collation of the national bulk tank SCC data for 2015 by DAFM, the winners of the CellCheck Milking for Quality Awards were announced in November. The second national award ceremony was held, attended by award winners and their partners, industry representative and sponsors. This very successful evening was supported by the Irish Farmer’s Journal and Ornua, with the plaques for the winners sponsored again this year by the FBD Trust. While there has been clear progress in the SCC of the national herd in the last few years, it is also fascinating to see continual progress in the ‘Best 500’ herds; the first year that the awards were presented, all the winners had an SCC <103,000 cells/mL, which reduced to <97,000 cells/mL last year and <87,000 cells/mL this year. This is a phenomenal achievement, and one which all award winners should be very proud of, with many receiving an award plaque for the 3rd year in a row. A presentation of a hamper was also made to the supplier from each of the 13 participating co-ops,

with the lowest average SCC for 2015. Further analysis of the 2015 SCC data shows continued progress in the udder health of the national herd, with the proportion of herds with an annual average SCC <200,000 cells/ mL increasing from 50% in 2014 to 60% in 2015, and the proportion of the national milk pool with an SCC <200,000 cells/mL at 64% in 2015, which is an increase from 55% in 2014. Work with Limerick RVL and the commercial labs participating in the proficiency testing (PT) scheme continues, with expansion of the PT scheme this quarter to include antimicrobial sensitivity patterns. The TWG had a very fruitful meeting, with several very important areas of work underway, including continued development of the next phase of multi- disciplinary service provider training. The last quarter of the year is always a busy one, with many conferences, seminars and other educational activities occurring at this time. One of these was the 50 th annual meeting of the Association for Veterinary Teaching and Research Work, at which I presented a paper on a study of udder health and culling reasons in cull cows. I also attended the British Mastitis Conference, and the European Mastitis Research Workers meeting, which was a unique opportunity to share ideas and learn all about themost recent mastitis research in Europe, at varying stages of completion.

PAGE 15

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update BVD

AnimalHealthIreland.ie BVDFree

Programme Manager: Dr David Graham

Results B y the end of Quarter 4 of 2016 just over 2.3 million calves had been born, with test results received for 2.29 million (99%) of these. The overall prevalence of PI calves born in 2016 was 0.17%, representing a reduction of almost 50% compared to 2015, when 0.33% were identified as PI. The prevalence of herds in which one or more calves had a positive or inconclusive result also decreased markedly from 5.9% to 3.2%. The BVD Implementation Group (BVDIG) continued to emphasise the importance of prompt removal of all PI animals once identified, with strict isolation where the option to conduct a confirmatory re-test is applied. At the end of 2016 only 282 of the 3,757 PI calves born in 2016 were still alive (Figures 1A, B), compared to a figure of 891 of the 7,397 born during 2015. This increased rate of removal was assisted by the introduction by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) of restrictions (on both movements in and out) for herds retaining PI animals for more than seven weeks after the date of their first test. The status of almost all animals in the 83,000 breeding herds in Ireland is now known and this, in combination with progress of the programme has resulted in almost 65,000 of the 83,000 breeding herds currently having Negative Herd Status (NHS) click here for weekly result updates. At the end of 2016 there were only 44,000 of approximately 5.7 million animals in breeding herds whose status was not known. 31,000 of these were animals born before the start of the programme in 2013, with the remainder typically being recently born calves that had not yet completed the testing process. Determining the status of these animals is important for two reasons. Firstly, small numbers of these continue to be found to be PI and secondly the presence of these untested animals will prevent otherwise eligible herds from being awarded Negative Herd Status (NHS) and having access to lower- cost testing. Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) The Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) provides an investigation by a trained veterinary practitioner for herds with one or more positive result in 2016. These investigations are funded through the Rural Development Plan and seek to review herd biosecurity, identify a plausible source or sources of infection, ensure that the herd is left free from BVDV and agree farm-specific biosecurity measures to prevent its re- introduction. By the end of 2016, 1,430 investigations had been requested following positive results in 2016, of which approximately 70% have been completed, the biosecurity recommendations provided to herd owners and the results reported to AHI.

PAGE 16

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme update BVD

Preliminary analysis of results indicates that the majority (82%) of herd owners were provided with three biosecurity recommendations, with these most commonly relating to the risks of introduction of virus associated with personnel (including the farmer), the purchase of cattle, contact with neighbouring cattle at pasture and the role of vaccination. One or more plausible sources of infection were identified in 84% of herds, with a single plausible source identified in 47% of herds. In approximately one third of cases the source was considered to be within the herd, while in two thirds of cases it was outside the herd, This latter proportion is anticipated to increase further as the number of herds with NHS increases, requiring a greater emphasis on bioexclusion measures to prevent accidental introduction of BVD virus. Programme development The target for the programme continues to be eradication by 2020. While progress to date is encouraging, the results of modelling work presented recently to the BVDIG in Q3 indicated that further measures are required if this target is to be met. During Q4 the BVDIG met several times, including a meeting with the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine to discuss a number of programme enhancements proposed by the BVD Technical Working Group to achieve this goal. As a result of these meetings, a number of important decisions regarding the programme were made, with these being communicated to herd owners as Key Messages for 2017. These are summarized below: 1. Tissue tag testing will continue in all herds for 2017 . An important change for 2017 is the availability of more than one source of tags ( click here for an up-to-date list of approved suppliers). The BVDIG, in conjunction with the National Reference Laboratory, have taken measures to ensure that laboratories are designated to test additional tag types. Herd owners are advised to check with their tag supplier or AHI ( click here for details) to identify suitable laboratories for the tag type they are using. 2. Increased financial supports provided by DAFM but reduced time limits for removal of PI calves. a. Beef herds: €185 for beef breed animals removed with a registered date of death on AIM within 3 weeks of the initial test, reducing to €60 if removed in the 4 th or 5 th week after the initial test. b. Dairy herds i. Dairy and dairy cross heifers: €150 if removed within 3 weeks of the initial test, reducing to €35 if removed in the 4 th or 5 th week after the initial test. ii. €30 for removal of bull calves within 3 weeks of the initial test. 3. Restriction of herds retaining PI calves and notification of neighbours. DAFM will automatically restrict movements into and out of herds that retain PI animals for more than five weeks after the date of the initial test. Restrictions will be automatically lifted following removal of PIs. Neighbouring herds will also be notified, advising them to take appropriate biosecurity measures to minimize the risk of accidental introduction of infection.

PAGE 17

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update BVD

4. Confirmatory and dam testing by blood sample only. Testing of the dam of PI calves and, where desired, confirmatory testing of the calf must be done on a blood sample. A supplementary tissue tag can no longer be used for testing these animals. DAFM will fund the sampling visit by the herd’s veterinary practitioner and the subsequent testing. 5. Veterinary investigations of all herds with PI calves born in 2017. All herds with PI calves born in 2017 are required to undergo a TASAH investigation within 3 months of the date of the first positive result. Communication and implementation of these measures will be key activities for Q1 of 2017.

Figure 1A - map showing distribution of PI births during 2016. Each hexagon represents an areas of approximately 10km 2

Figure 1B - map showing distribution of all PI animals born 2013-2016 that remain alive at the end of 2016.

PAGE 18

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update Johne’s Disease

Johne's Control AnimalHealthIreland.ie

Programme Manager: Lorna Citer

T he latter part of 2016 saw a continuation of communication activities with the delivery of information events for milk processor field staff on basic aspects of Johne’s disease, including some practical ways in which farmers can reduce the risk of its spread onto or within a farm. Based on the feedback received it is planned to hold further, similar events in 2017. The principal focus of attention in the final quarter of 2016 was a major consultation process, aimed at clarifying the views of stakeholders with regard to the future of JD control in Ireland, as the pilot phase of the programme drew to a conclusion in December. A series of bilateral meetings and consultations with stakeholders was followed by a seminar, which was opened by the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed T.D.. The meetings and the seminar confirmed support for the continuation of Johne’s disease control in Ireland under the leadership of AHI, and attention has now shifted to developing a business plan for the future programme that can be supported by all stakeholders. During the course of the consultation process, information from two significant research projects on the economic impact of Johne’s disease within the dairy sector was presented. Researchers from Teagasc, utilising data from the Johne’s disease Pilot Dairy Control Programme, examined the potential economic impact of Johne’s disease on the milk processing and farming sectors of the dairy industry. This work was undertaken as part of the ICONMap research project. The market-level research showed that the cost of Johne’s disease control is relatively low compared to

the benefits that could be expected to be derived from a control programme. Both research projects have been influential in the development of a framework for a future National Johne’s Disease Control Programme which will build on the solid base established by the Pilot Programme. Enhancements are planned and will be progressively introduced over the next 12-18 months, subject to the agreement of stakeholders. The market-level research showed that the cost of Johne’s disease control is relatively low compared to the benefits that could be expected to be derived from a control programme. Because of the close relationship between farm biosecurity, calf health and dairy hygiene, stakeholders have conveyed to AHI themerit of taking amore holistic approach to animal health at the farm level and moving beyond control of Johne’s disease as a single disease entity. Such an approach would align with moves being made in other countries with significant Johne’s disease control programmes in place. It would also be expected to improve the sustainability of Johne’s disease control in Ireland, and to further strengthen the positioning of Irish dairy products, demonstrating our continuing commitment to producing food of the highest quality for the domestic and international marketplaces.

PAGE 19

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update Beef Healthcheck

Beef HealthCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

Programme Manager: Rebecca Carroll

P reliminary analysis of Beef HealthCheck data suggests that the frequency of fluke damaged livers in cattle at slaughter has increased slightly over the summer months and into the autumn, with live fluke detected at low but consistent levels through this period. The frequency of these findings is greatest in cattle going to slaughter from north western and western counties. The DAFM liver fluke forecast for 2016, which incorporates information from Beef HealthCheck, advised that the risk of disease due to liver fluke infection is high for most parts of the country apart from isolated areas of the east and southeast where there is a lower risk of disease in cattle. Click here for the full forecast. More information on managing liver fluke this winter is available on the Animal Health Ireland website click here.

Weekly liver fluke results from Beef HealthCheck participating meat plants from April to November

10 15 20 25 30

0 5 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

Damaged by liver fluke with live fluke observed Damaged by liver fluke without live fluke observed WEEK

PAGE 20

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update Beef Healthcheck

Over the course of 2017 Animal Health Ireland will conduct further analysis of the Beef HealthCheck data including the prevalence of liver and lung lesions in different categories of animals, economic analysis of the impact of liver fluke, liver abscesses and lung lesions and more in-depth analysis of the geographic distribution of animals affected by these lesions.

The Beef HealthCheck programme has now been rolled out in all 18 participating Meat Industry Ireland plants, and is currently capturing data from approximately 65% of the national beef kill. An official launch of the online Beef HealthCheck dashboards took place on 31 st January 2017 in Dublin. The launch promoted the facility which AHI has developed to allow farmers to view their Beef HealthCheck results on the ICBF website. To assist with herd health planning, farmers can also share the information with their veterinary practitioners through the ICBF website. Click here for a step-by-step guide to view, understand and share the online Beef HealthCheck information.

Liver fluke results from Beef HealthCheck participating meat plants by slaughter herd location

0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Damaged by liver fluke with live fluke observed Damaged by liver fluke without live fluke observed

PAGE 21

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Programme Update IBR / BioSecurity

AnimalHealthIreland.ie IBRFree

IBR TWG Chairman: Dr Michael Gunn

T he cost-benefit analysis of a possible national IBR control scheme continues to be developed. Several possible options for a control plan and associated herd classifications were discussed at meetings of the TWG in October and November. It is intended to provide information on these possible options to experts who will model the benefits and disadvantages of each, with a view to providing a solid basis for selecting the optimal control strategy for Ireland. It is hoped to put these options forward for consultations with stakeholders during 2017. Updates on possible developments for IBR Control in Northern Ireland have been presented to the group. The TWG continues to monitor the numbers of animals being exported live to EU Member States, and the extent to which they are subject to additional health requirements in those countries of destination in which approved control programmes are in place, or in which the eradication of IBR has been achieved.

BioSecurity AnimalHealthIreland.ie

BioSecurity TWG Chairman: Dr John Mee

A research proposal on the biosecurity aspects of contract heifer rearing was presented by the Chair to the Knowledge Transfer meetings organised by DAFM for private veterinary practitioners’ feedback in November, 2016. This proposal was subsequently awarded funding by Teagasc for four years (2017-2021). This will be a collaborative study between Teagasc, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Irish Cattle Breeding Federation, University College Dublin, University of Ghent and Animal Health Ireland. The next Biosecurity TWG meeting is planned for March, 2017. Further information is available on the Biosecurity webpage on the AHI website click here , and past press publications are available on the Biosecurity press page click here .

PAGE 22

AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER WINTER/SPRING EDITION

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22

Made with FlippingBook - Online Brochure Maker