Ocular Melanoma Patient Guide

Diagnosing Ocular Melanoma Ocular melanoma is most often detected by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist during a dilated eye exam. Often, OM is asymptomatic until the tumor grows large enough to create visual disturbances. Iris and conjunctival melanoma may sometimes be diagnosed by external — from the outside — examination. Detection of choroidal or ciliary melanoma requires a thorough dilated eye exam. After an OM diagnosis, your doctor will take an x-ray, MRI, CT scan and/or PET scan to check the body for signs of cancer beyond the eye. Unlike cutaneous melanoma, a biopsy is not usually taken to diagnose OM. Rather, OM tends to be a clinical diagnosis — meaning it is often made based on signs and symptoms.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

> Educate yourself and loved ones about your diagnosis. > Find a support system. Family, friends, strangers, in-person, online, phone support — choose one (or more) that is best for you. > Ocular melanoma survival statistics describe a group of similar patients…but they may have nothing to do with your individual chance of survival. > Every patient is different. There is no “blanket” treatment plan. > It is important to be an active participant in your treatment. Seek out an OM specialist. Be your own advocate.

REMINDER

OCULAR MELANOMA

UVEAL Melanoma

CONJUNCTIVAL Melanoma

CHOROIDAL Melanoma

IRIS Melanoma

CILIARY BODY Melanoma

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www.cureom.org

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