1944

STArf 7fA Cf./@S ' COLLfG£

DES I G NED AN D PUB LI SH ED

BY THE STUDENTS OF THE

STATE TEACH ER S CO II E G E

AT BUFFALO • NEW YORK

MARJOR I E FE LBER. EDITOR - IN-CHIEF

HERBERT NEWLOVE • BUSINESS MANAGER

REPRODUCED THROUGHOUT BY LITHOGRAPHY

THE WILLIAM J. KEllER COMPANY. BUFFALO

F o R E wo R D

TO A GRADUATE, PERHAPS HALF THE FUN OF HIS

YEARBOOK IS THE BELIEF THAT IN TEN, FIFTEEN YEARS

HE Will PICK IT UP, TURN ITS PAGES, lOOK AT A

PICTURE AND SAY TO HIMSELF, "I REMEMBER THAT."

BUT THIS YEAR'S GRADUATES Will NOT BE ABLE TO

SAY THIS. SCATTERED THROUGHOUT THE ELMS Will

BE PICTURES OF INTERClASS SING, Y CARNIVAL,

DANCES, .. CERTAINLY ... BUT THEY Will BRING

BACK MEMORIES TO ONLY HALF THE ORIGINAL CLASS.

FOR '44 IS ' A · DIVIDED ClASS - DIVIDED BY A WAR

WHICH HAS DRAFTED MOST OF ITS MEN FROM OUR

CAMPUS. LIKE THE TREE FOR WHICH IT IS NAMED,

THE ELMS HAS FORKED IN TWO DIRECTIONS - THE

ONE DEPICTING THE LIFE OF SERVICE TO COllEGE

AND COMMUNITY, THE OTHER, OF MUCH GREATER SERVICE TO COUNTRY. THIS IS J>.N ElMS FOR you

WHO Will GRADUATE IN JUNE .' .. AND FOR YOU

WHO WOULD HAVE GRADUATED HAD NOT FATE

INTERVENED. BUT MAY THIS STORY OF COllEGE

LIFE PRESENTED HERE DEFY TIME AND DISTANCE, TO

MAKE US AGAIN, IN SPIRIT AT lEAST, Oi'IE ClASS

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DEDICATION

TO MR.. CHARLES BRADLEY WE DEDICATE THIS ELMS

IN APPRECIATION OF HIS YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE

COllEGE. OF THE ART DEPARTMENT WH ICH HE

FOUNDED, FOSTERED, AND ST ill HEADS, HE HAS JUST

CAUSE TO BE PROUD. HIS DEPARTMENT HAS GAINED

STATEWIDE FAME BECAUSE HE HAS KEPT HIS MIND

OPEN WITH THE YEARS, AND TEMPERED NEW THEORIES

WITH HIS EXPERIENCE. AS A FR IEND AND FATHER, HE

HAS ALWAYS BEEN APPROACHABLE, EASY TO TALK

WITH, AND READY WITH SOUND, PRACTICAL ADVICE.

AS A TEACHER, HE HAS NEVER lOWERED A STANDARD

OR COMPROMISED A PRINCIPLE. AS AN ARTIST, HE

HAS ACHIEVED RECOGNITION IN MANY FIELDS AND

ESPECIAllY IN WATER COLOR PAINTING. AS A CRAFTS–

MAN HE HAS DISPLAYED UNUSUAL ABILITIES IN WOOD

CARVING. AS A MAN, MR. BRADLEY REPRESENTS TO

US THE EPITOME OF HIGH PROFESSIONAL INTEGRITY

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OUR

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FATEFUL YEAR OF DESTINY IN WHICH THE TIDE OF

VICTORY CHANGED DECISIVELY IN OUR FAVOR;

WHEN OVER 600 OF OUR STUDENTS AND · RECENT

GRADUATES, PATRIOTIC AND LOYAL TO THE AMERICAN

IDEALS LEARNED IN SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CLASS-

ROOMS, WERE IN OUR ARMED FORCES CONSECRATING

THEMSELVES TO THE TRIUMPH OF JUSTICE AND

DECENCY OVER TYRANNY AND TREACHERY; WHEN

IN HUMBLE PRIDE AND SINCERE GRATITUDE WE

EAGERLY FOLLOWED THEIR FORTUNES IN TRAINING

CAMPS, ON THE HIGH SEAS AND ON FOREIGN FRONTS

AND ANXIOUSLY AND PRAYERFULLY AWAITED THE

JOYOUS DAY OF THEIR RETURN; WHEN OUR

COLLEGE, CONSCIOUS OF HER LOSS BUT PROUD OF HER

MISSION, CONTINUED TO CARRY ON AND PREPARE

OTHERS FOR THE SERVICE OF AMERICAN DEMOCRACY

Harry W. Rockwell, President for Twenty– five Years of Forward looking Service

IN THE SCHOOL ROOMS OF OUR NATION.-H. W. R.

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DEAN CATHERINE REED

To Dean Reed we owe much of what we got out of our four years at State. Through her insistence that we assume responsibilities, we have become increasingly self– directing persons. We admire her for her magnificent ability. at or· ganization; we are grateful for her expert guidance and helpful advice Most crowded waiting room on campus is Dean Horn's. In his . office, he has untang led many a schedule, listened to many a per- . plexing problem and solved them. It is to him servicemen home on furlough come to talk over the old days, and the future. His earnest desire to raise profes– sional standards is overshadowed only by the genuine warmth and geniality of his contacts with us The student's friend - that's Dr. Fretz. A firm believer in the value of student opinion, he has carried our banner into the battle on count– less occasions. His rare teaching ability, his remarkable insight and inimitable sense of humor, have endeared him to us and made him a tradition · that's unforgettable DE A N RALPH HORN DEAN RAYMOND FRETZ

Mildred S. Roesser, History Instructor

left to right: Irving C. Perkins, Instruc– tor in History; Lester B. Mason, Assist– ant Professor of History; Robert O. Demond, Professor and Department Head; Marion P. Dana, Instructor

E D u CAT o N Robert E. Albright, Professor of Sociology, Director of Extension and 1944 Summer Session Left to right: Row one, Irene H. Summers, As – .sistant Professor of Education; Paul W. Sloan, Professor of Education; Margaret S. Quayle, Assistant Professor of -Education; Row two, Opal A. Risinger, Instructor in Teacher Train– ing for the Physicall,¥ Handicapped; Grace A. Allen, Assistant Director of Trai.f1ingi Homer A. Bruce, Instructor in Education; Sherman G. Crayton, Professor of Education; Row three, Oscar E. Hertzberg, Professo r of Ed~cation, Head of Department; Chester A. Pugsley, Pro– fessor of Elementary School Administration; Kate V. Wofford, Professor of Rural Education, Head of Department; Horry J. Steel, Director of Training, Placement, Professor of Education

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Left to right: Marchiona M. DiMarco, In– structor in Science; Eleanor L. Schrader, In – structor in Science; Charles A. Vail, Instruc– tor in Science; Raymond M. Fretz, Assistant Professor of Science; Anna M. Gemmill, As– sistant Professor of Science, Head of Depart– ment; Margaret Dupre, Instructor in Science

N G u A G E

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Charles A. Messner! Professor of Languages

left to right: Groce A. Allen, Assistant Principa l; Chester A. Pugsley, Principal

left to right: Hertha S. Gan e y, Instruc– tor in English. and latin; Inez M. Knapp, Instructor in Fourth Grade; Martha G. Metz, Instructor in First Grade; Chester A. Pugsley, Principal; T. Dolores Rousseau, Instructor in Sec– ond Grade; Marguerite Stock berger, Instructor in History and·Social Studies; Harry C. Johnson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science; M. Mel– vina Svec, Instructor in Geography; Irma l. Mazzarella, Instructor in Fifth Grade; Eleanor M . Gover, In structor in Sixth Grade; Hildred l. Washburn, In– structor, Third Grade; Grace A. Allen

SCHOOL OF PRACTICE

Leit to right: Esther M. McGinnis, Professor of Home Economicsi Margaret A. Grant, Instruc~ tor in Home Economics Education; Ar lin e John~ son, Instructor in Home Economics Education; May C. Nye, Instructo,r in Home Economicsi Mildred L. Sipp, Professor of Home Economics, Head of Department; Alma R. Roudebush, In~ structor in Home Economics; Esther F. Segner, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Educa– tion; Ruth Pa lmer, Instructor in Home Eco~ nomics; Faye Keever, Instructor in Home Eco– nomics; Agnes H. Louchren, Stenographer; Berd ina C. Dolberg, Stenographer; Martha S. Pratt, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education; Mary Louise Cockefair, Instructor

HOME ECONOM ICS

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Left to right: Walter B. Weber, Instructor in Electricity; Edward l. Morrice, Instructor in Methods and Practice Teaching; George M. Quackenbush, Assistant Professor of Voco· tional Organization; Andrew W. Grabau, In– structor in English; Irving C. Perkins, Profes– sor of Vocational Education, Head of Depart. ment; John Fontana, Instructor in Mechanics

ENG L

Left to right, Eileen C. Mulhol– land, Assistant Professor of English; Alfred Holman Jr., In– structor in English; Harold C. Crain, Instructor ' in English; John M. Thurber, Professor of English, Department Head; Mina S. Goossen, Assistant Pro– fessor of English and Dramatics

INDUSTRIAL ARTS

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ART

EDUCAT

Affiliated Albright Art School; left to right, Philip C. Elliott, Director; Dorothy Sides, Secretory to the Director; Charles Jacobs, Teaching Methods; Caroline Hennicke, Registrar. Not in picture: Virginia Cuth– bert, Charles leClair, Helen Pratt, David Reider, Irma Seitz, Francis Valentine, Clifford Westermeier

Left to right: Carolyn W. Heyman, Instructor in Art; Charles B. Bradley, Professor of Art Edu– cation, Head of Department; Stan,ley A. ezurles, Assistant Professor of Art; D. Kenneth Wine– brenner and Ruth M. Karcher, Art Instructors

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left to right , Kenneth R, Coghill, In– structor in Music; Mary Louise Mc– Mahon , Instructor in Music; Silas L. Boyd, Ptofessor and Department Head

GEOGRAPHY

Katherine Thomas Whittemore, As– sistant Professor, Department Head

MATHEMATICS

REGISTRAR

Isabel Houck Kideney

left to right, Harry C. Johnson, Assistant Professor; Reuben S. Ebert, Professor of Mathematics

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

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left to right: Virginia M. Frost, Instructor in Physical Educa– tion; Beryl E. Frech, Instructor in Health Education; Martin H. Rogers, Instructor in Health Edu– cation; Gertrude Roach, Instruc– tor in Health Education; Ruth E. Houston, Professor of Health Education, Head of Department

PLACEMENT Harry J. Steel, Director of Placement; Mary Lutz Ball, A l u~ni. Placement Secretary

FINANCIAL SECRETARY

Marion Clo"rk Sreene

COLLEGE CO-OP

V I SUAL EDUCATION

Stanley Czurl e s, Director of Visual Education, Assistant Professor of Art

Top to bottom: Joan Steinmiller, Wil – ma Nichols, Kathryn e Michaels, Stu– dent Assis tants. Standing left to right: Charlot M. Fetterman, Manager of Bookstore; Marietta Rindone, Assist– ant Manager of College Bookstore

Left to right: Frances G. Hepinstall, Head, and Marion . Buchholz, Assistant

LIBRARIANS

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HEALTH SERVICE

left to right: Ethel M. Honse!), College Nursei Marion F. Ayers, Assistant

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THE S E WE

W 0 U L D

H 0 NOR

S T A F F

OFFICE

Left to right: Kathryn S. Graham, Catharine Rudo lph, Jane l. Diaddario, Agnes H. louch– ren, Berdena C. Dolberg, Mary Hulse, Rose– mary Fornes, Clara E. Bauer, Mary M. May

For their noble ideals and scholarship, for their years of service to our Alma Mater, for their sympathetic guidance to the students, for the examples which they have set inspiring us to a deeper pride and enthusiasm in our profession these we wou ld honor

C A F E T E R

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left to right: Mrs. James Rose, Anna H. Miles, Mabel Gilbert, Manageri Mrs·, Duncan Radloff

MAINTENANCE

Top to bottom, Miss Ei leen C. Mu lh olland, Miss Grace A. Allen, Dr. _Anna M. Gemmill

Left to right : Herman Lorenz, lloyd Myhill, ' Harry Curtin, Superintendent of Buildings

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FROSH DAYS

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Statewide man hunt

State's youngest member class, the Freshman, has . left its mark. Starting right off in a musical vein, they upset the College during Freshman week with their singing of Don't Do It Darlin'. They further upset it a few weeks later by becoming the first Freshman class in history to win the Interclass Sing. And still later wi th their assembly program. Their one year at College has been typified by their unity of action, their desire and ability to follow the capable people whom they have made leaders

Dirtv work afoot

Victory serenade

The lights dim. The leader's arms are raised in readiness. The curtain slowly opens to a cadence of humming voices, feeling the rhythm of the voices, feeling the rhythm of our hearts as we wait breathlessly, hopefully, knowing your song is best. Each so ng is the wish, the spirit and the purpose of those who sing it. Each song should win . But then– the curtain closes, the leader's arms fall in an echoing bow, the lights laugh on, and the rhythm of a hundred feet and hands demands one choice . One choice -one winner-three leiters edged in black I The Seniors know absolutely they will win; the Juniors positively; the Sophomores surely have The Chance; the Freshmen? Impossible! But-what's this? The impossible happened . The proud Freshmen were announced as win- . ners of the 1943 Interclass Sing at State

Pleasure time

INTERCLASS SING

CHRISTMAS

Every yea r we have come to expect from the Dramatic Club a true presentation of the Christ– mas ideal, in the form of a religious drama. This Christmas season, the College enioyed a Medieval Christmas Festival, Southumberland's Yule Tide. The gym was transformed into the Great Hall of the Castle of Southumberland, and here came the Duke and Duchess, Lords and Ladies, Bishop, Monk and Nun, Men-at– Arms, Waits, Minstrels, Singing Girl~, Jesters, and Mummers. The trumpet sounded three blasts for silence, and then the Herald pro– claimed that the Great Hall should be given over for one iolly night on the Eve of Christmas to the Lord of Misrule. Yeoman dragged in the Great Yule Log, and the company sang "God Save the King." Then the fun began . Punch and Judy carried on their traditional show of of Misrule was borne into the Hall with courtly pageantry. The Morris Dancers were followed by the Tumblers and the Acrobats. A peddler was allowed to show his wares, the Chief Stew- ard carried in the Boar's Head. Yes, the Th ree Blind Mice were at the Festival, and old Father the doctor, the baby and the Evil One. The Lord

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Christmas. And of course SI. George killed the

Turk, who was revived by the Necromancer, while the Dragon passed the old money box through the crowd for "five or six shillings"

lib 'n Truc;ker

The Duke greets his sublects

G05h! Men!

All through the Festivol the corcls wove the rnogic spell of Christrnas. But when the glorious rnelody, "Hork the Herald Angels Sing" was heard in the Great Hall, a quiet fell on the lively scene. The lights were lowered, the curtains drawn, and the beautiful, rnedieval Festival ended with the solernn tableau of the Nativity . Thus the cheerful sirnple faith of the Midd le Ages was recaptured for severa l hours in the Christrnas Festival at State

Three years of classes, of listen· ing to instructors, and suddenly positions are reversed . You find yourself standing in front of a room 'with approximately thirty pairs of eyes focused on you; now you are one of those stu– dents you have been hearing about ever since you came to State. But soon you find that you don't really mind taking care of a class in spite of your dread of. that moment . You may have sworn that you'd rather die than teach music or art or science, or whatever your own particular Waterloo might be . But after a few weeks you're teaching those subjects as if you were a past master of them. It begins to be fun to put your theories into practice. It's a real thrill to find out that those youngsters to whom you are teaching a unit on seeds went home and tramped thin the sales of ration stamp Number, 18 hunting for one seed that is especial ly hard to find . The ef– fort seems worthwhile when one little fellow carries an apple seed in his mouth all the way to schoo l so that he will be very sure not to lose it. Then, more

Stop drooling

Y CARNIVAL

ladeez and Gentlemen! Step right up and purchase a lovely soovuneer of college days.... Only a dime. · .. "So I says to him" ... "And waddya think he had for lunch?" ... Six cents! Do I hear seven cents? Going-going-gone! ... Even better than last year" . .. Your profile for a pennyl . .. "Only a 'B' when it should have been" ... Apples on a stick ! · .. Buy some pretzels-th ree holes on a red, red ribbon-and take them with you to the Beer Gar– den! Muzzle while you guzzle! ... "Besides the Marines always do" ... "Holman and Crain are in it I think" ... And if you do not tell the truth you must pay the consequences: How are the seats in the balcony lettered? No, not with black crayon-from Aa to 00. Oh,Oh! And there are thirty-five boxes in the Student Center! S-o -o· o if you'll kindly sling this pie at your opponent, we'll be glad to launder your wa rdrobe free of charge ... Feelin' loose, Goose?" ... "Heavenly Knightsl Twelve already" · .. What? No more floor show? No ice cream left? · .. So long pleeze ... Red Cross thank you

PRACTICE TEACHING

quickly than you thought pos– sible those weeks of practice teaching have flowed down the stream of time into the pool of the past . You face the future wi th confidence . You know .you have much to learn, but, while teaching, you have been taught -taught the most comprehen· sive course of your college career

Try It this way

SENIOR NIGHT

The (andidute5

'T il that day when peace comes ogain, the traditional Senior Ball has departed . Holding its place is something new ... Senior Night. Occurring this year on March 17, Senior Shenanigans consisted of varied activities– dancing, swimming and badmin– ton . Senior Night was fun. But it will never take the place of the Senior Ball whose return to our social calendar we are all awoiting with great eagerness

The pause thut refreshes

JUNIOR PROM

The Queen

"They said that it couldn't be done, but they did it." The Class of '45 was told it couldn't be done-but they did it. They were told that this was a war year, and that you just couldn't sell a Junior Prom to the students . But they did it. The entire class and their committees made careful and detailed plans, and they wound up with one of the most successful Junior Proms in the Col lege 's history. And they topped off a ~ight of dancing by crowning a queen, secure with the thought that another State tradition had been kept "in state" for our boys

SPORTS

War has dug deeply "inta what was for– merly a buzz of activity in our gymna– sium. Basketball this year was informal, but at least the game was kept alive. The same can be said for swimming . Inter -mural sports were the thing. Com– petition between classes was keen, and the games, no matter what else, were hard fought and cleanly played. In ad– dition to Soccer, Tennis, Badminton, Volleybal l and Ping Pong, there was a reviva l of interest in Archery. Physical recreation during times like these should be a part of every curriculum . We have tried to make ours varied and interesting

Mgy I have the next one?

Cgzzling Don - at Ihe post

Arrowschmid

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AN OPEN LETTER TO THE CLASS OF 1944 - As the e lected leader in your sophomore year, I would like to ask you a favor . What are you going to do with all this wonderful clay you will soon find in your hands? What kind of person will result from the mo ld you are about to create? For a sculptor you will be-of beautiful, workable clay. May I ask you to make something fine of it? May I say-mind not the mental capacity, the co lor, the ancestry, the religion of the parts. But each of these and all of these make Ameri – cans.-Lt. Walter Mordaunt (President, Class of 1944, Sophomore Year)

Stanley Dietz - who po~ed for this fine p itlUrI! showing the so ldier's ioy upon re – ce iving mail from home - was one of the first alumni from Siale to die in service

We know that you ore proud of State too, that there is an affecti on- toward our litt le quadrangle that wi ll never leave you . Many of you have been back to visit. Witll some of you it was the desire to see o ld friends; with otllers, whose c lassmates have long since graduated, it was the desi.re to -recapture memories of tllose with whom they once walked the halls. For you are really living in two worlds now ... physica ll y, you are finishing a grim task ... spiritua ll y you are often home, here with us, lounging in the Co-op, drinking a coke. You are even laughing perhaps at the difficu lties you once encountered-that seemed so serious at the time-and now are bright humorous moments in your min d. The monotony of the daily routine, which seemed so irksome, now gives you a sense of security as you look back. When the black– out is over, and the gleam of lights p ierce the shadows one by one, our light wi ll shine os it alwoys has, brighter than it ever has before. You will make it so

The blackout which we had the oth er night seemed for a moment to suspend time, and in its stil lness, crysta llized the multitude of thoughts which -we had been trying to grasp. We can't help but think of this war as a temporary blackout, and we know that someday, as that lovely song declares, the lights will go on agai n all over the world. In th e meantime, we at State are not living in an ivory tower. We are conscious every minute of the day that there is a war, but we are not letting that fa.ct warp our minds. We are proud of each one of you who has left our halls to fight for that intangible something for wh ich man's soul cries out . .. ca ll it democracy or freedom ... ca ll it the right to be right, or the right to be wrong , perhaps you have no nome for it, but you're figh ting for it, and we are w ith you. You may have left your name in the roster of your State fratern ity, bu t now you have joined the biggest fraternity in the world, the armed f.orees, striving to bring fraternity to a ll

ALBERT ABGOTT * JANE ADAMS. CHARLES AMBELLAN • fREDERICK AMBELLAN • DONALD ARMAGOST. THOMAS ASBURY. RAY AST • WILLIAM ATKINS. CHARLES AUSTIN. MARGARET BABCOCK. STANLEY BABCOCK. LAVINE BACKUS. PAUL BACON • .CLlFTON BAINARD • ROBERT BAKER * WILLIAM BAKER. MICHAEL· BA.LWAN • KATHLEEN BARBER * AGNES BARD. EDWIN BARON. HOWARD BARRETT. RAYMOND BARRETT. LAWRENCE BARTZ. GROVER BATES. JOHN BATTAGLIA • ARTHUR BAUMEISTER * CHARLES BAUMLER. HAROLD BEAL • CLARENCE BECKE~ MATHEW BISKUP * OSCAR B1XKY • ROBERT BLACK • GEORGE BLIGH • CLARENCE BOEBEL • ROBERT BOLLA RD FREDERICK BORKOWSKI • CLIffORD BORTH * SHERWOOD BOWKER • EDMUND BOWMAN * EARL BOYD • WILLIAM BOYLE. CHARLES BRADY. JOHN BRANICKI • HOWARD BREMER * GEORGE BRIGHTON. RALPH BRIGHTON • PHILIP BRIND·AMOUR • HELEN BROSMER • DONALD BROSSMAN .. ALBERT BROWN * FREDERICK BROWN. FREMONT BROWN JEWETT BROWN. PERRY BROWN * RAYMOND BROWN * PAUL BRUCATO * GEORGE BUDD. JAMES BURKE * RUSSELL BURLEY. KATHERINE BURLINGAME. ALEX BURNES. CHARLES BURR * DORTHEA BURTON .. HARVEY BUTLER. JOHN BUTLER. WALTER CALHOUN * WILLIAM CALLON * ANDREW CAMPBELL * BOYD CAMPBELL. CHARLES CAMPBEtL LAWRENCE CAMPBELL * DAVID CAPPIELLO * ELLIOTT CARLSON * STUART CARLSON * RICHARD CARNIVAL. ARTHUR CARR * RAYMOND CARR • SAMUEL CARR * HARMON CARTER * CARMEN CATUZZI * HELEN CEPURA * FRANK CERATO * ROSANNA CHAD * DONA LD CHAMPAGNE * HARRY CHAPMAN * HORACE CHARLES * RUDOLPH (HER. KAUER • JOHN CHIAVARO • PHILIP CHRISTNER * DONALD CLARK * A LBERT CLARKE * GERALD CLARKE * W. KENT CLARKE. JOSEPH CLAYTON * TAD CLEMENTS. ISABELLE CLIFFORD * _ WILLIAM CLYDESDALE. GEORGE COCHERN ROBERT COHO * VIRGINIA COHO * BRIAN COLE * PAUL COLEMAN * EDWARD COLLARD. HOWARD COLLINS FRANCIS CONRAD. SAMUEL COf'HI * DAVID COOKE * ROBERT COPPOLA. THERESA COPPOLA. RUTH COSSABOON RICHARD COUGHLIN. WAYNE COVERT. IRVING COWLE * EDWARD. COWLEY. DAVID COWNIE * HUBERT COYER RAYMOND CRANE. RICHARD CREAMER. KERMIT CRISSEY ~ CHARLES CUMBO. CATHERINE CUNNINGHAM. MUR. DOCK CUNNINGHAM • CHARLES CURTIN • HAROLD CURTIS • ABE CUTCHER .. GEORGE DAILEY • JAMES DALEY HUBERT DAVIES. THOMAS PAVIS * GEORGE DECKER * PAUL DELLINGER. ARTHUR DEMBOWSKI. ROBERT DICKINSON ALOYSIUS DIEBOLD. WILLIAM DIEHL * STANLEY DIETZ * JOSEPH DIGESARO • JAMES DIXON. PAUL DOANE • DON DOERIN~ * HOWARD DOMST • JOSEPH DORCZ~K • DONALD DONLEY. ARTHUR DOTY '* EDWIN DROPER • ESTHER DUDZIAK. LEONARD DUDZIAK. MATHEW DUGGAN. MARION P. DUNNING * JANE S. DUNNING * ANTHONY DURLAK MARJORIE DuROCHER • LEO DUSTMAN • PAUL EBERMAN • KENNETH .EDMUNDS * RALPH EGGLESTON * LAURA EHMAN. JOHN EIGENBROD * CLARENCE ELVEY • GEORGE EMBLJDGE * EDGAR ENEA * FRANK fSTVAN * STEWART FAIRBROTHER. SAM FEHRENZ * MAYNARD FELDMAN. MARGARET FELSINGER • I,.EO FENAR * M ICHAEL FENIELLO CARLYLE FENWICK * JOSEPH FERRAR * HENRY FESSARD * HARRY FEUCHT * DONALD FINKLE * WILLIAM FINNEGAN EDWARD FIRESTONE .* RAYMOND FISHER * ROBERT FITZGERALD * EDWARD f LAYER * ERNEST FLEMMING. THOMAS FLOOD. CHARLES FOSTER. HARVEY FOX. WARREN FRAHN * MARTIN FRIED. FRED FULLER. ERMO FURLANI VINCENT GALBO • NORMAN GAL£MBO • CHARLES GAMBERT * BENJAMIN GARELICK • CARLETON GERBRACHT CHARLES GERBRACHT * HAROLD GERBRACHT • HOWARD GEORGE • RICHARD GIBBONS * ALPHANSO GIGLIA CHARLES GIGLIA * HAROLD GILBERT . BERNARD GLASER * WILLIAM GLASGOW. STEPHEN GODFREY • WYONA GOETZ * ISRAEL GOLDWATER * ELIZABETH GOODFELLOW. DONALD GOODMAN. THOMAS GOODMAN * BERNARD GORROW * ANNE GOULI:> • ROBERT GRAHAM * WILSON GREATBA TCH • HARRY GREEN. ROBERT GREEN * JOHN GREGGO • CHARLES GREMKE • ROBERT GRIFFIN • LOUIS GRITIN • DANIEL GROSSMAN • ROGER GROTH • WILLIAM GROTKE • M. ANDREW GRZYWA • JOSEPH HAffEY. CREDE HAGERTY . ANNE HAGGERTY. LLOYD HAHN •• PAUL HALE. EDWARD HALL. SAMUEL HALPERT. CALISTA HALSTEAD. GLENN HAMILTON. JOHN HAMMEL • LAU· RENCE HANRATIY • STEPHEN HARRISON * HUGH HASLETT. DANIEL HEALY * ROBERT HEIST. FREDERICK HELLEN· BERG * EDWARD HELWIG. HENRY HEMPSTEAD .. A. WILLIAM HENDERSON * WILLI AM HERDLE * CLEMENT HERMAN WILLIAM HERMANN. WILLIAM HERRICK. WARD HERRMANN. RUSSELL HEWITT. EUGENE HILTON. HERBERT HILTON * PAUL HIRSEMAN * KENNETH HODGE * EUGENE HOEFFLER * GEORGE HOFFMAN * FRANCES HOLBROOK JAMES HOLfELNER • CLAYTON HOLLAND * MARVIN HOLLAND * GORDON HOLLENBECK. O . WILLARD HOLLOWAY ALBERT HOPKINS • BARBARA HOSKINS • JOSEPH HOURIHAN • WALTER HRYCIK * EDWARD HUDSPIT'H • RICHARD HUGHES • LOIS HUMPHREY * CHARLES HYDE • ELLIS HYDE • WILLIAM HYDE * EVELYN JAMES • ROBERT JOHNS ROBERT JOHNSON. CLYDE JONES * EDWARD JONES. REES JONES. RICHARD JONES. WILLIAM JONES * DONALD JOSEPH * ALBERT JOYCE * HERBERT KAISER. ALBERT KALLET • MELVIN KALLET * CLAYTON KAMINSKA • RICHARD KAPPLER. IRWIN KARCHMER * EDWARD KELLY * A LFRED KENYON * CHARLES KIEFER * STANTON KILBURN. WILLIAM KILCOYNE * ALBERT KINGSTON * ROBERT KINGSTON • VERA KINSLEY * JOSEPH KINZIE • GEORGE KIRCH • ROBERT KIRSCH. STEPHEN KLYM • WILLIAM KNEER. GEORGE KOENIG. CARL KOGLER. LEO KOTULA. MAYNARD KRANZ JOHN KRYLO • DONALD KUHUS • GEORGE KUHNS · . ANTHONY LaBUE * RALPH LADE. RKHARD LAPE • WALTER LARE • DONALD LAWLESS. DAVID LAWRENCE. JAMES LAZARONY • LLOYD LEACH. BERTRAM LEARMAN ERWIN LEDERER. CHARLES LEE . HENRY LEEGE • NORMAN LEEGE • GEORGE LEHR • GOMER LESCH . • JOHN LESLIE LEO LEVENKIND. AARON LEVINE .• JOHN LIDDLE. HERBERT L1DSTROM • RUTH LIND . GUNNAR LINDSTROM. ELMER LlPOWICZ • SAMUEL LoMAGLIO * RUSSELL LONGLEY * ALEXA~DER LORINCZ • LEONARD LOUIS • HAROLD

* SOL LUBOW

* JOHN LUNGER

* PETER LUCAS * AGNES MAHONEY * JEANNEITE MANNElLO

* LORAIN LUCE * WINIFRED MAHONEY

* MURRAY LUSTIG

* FRANCES LYNCH * S~LVATORE

LOWE

* PORTER MALLORY

* BEny MALLUE

NORMAN LYON MANISCALCO

* RICHARD MANSKE • ROBERT MARKOVITZ

* ROBERT MARKS • . ALBERT

* JOHN MAROSY • WILLIAM MARSH

* JOHN MARSO

* ELMER MARTIN

MAROONE • EDMOND MAROONE

* ROBERT MASON

* EDDIE MASSET • EUGENE MATHES

* JOHN MATIISON

* FRANK

SEBASTIAN MARTORANO MATZKE • DOROTHY MAY

* ALFRED MEGER

* ROSELYN MEYERS. JOHN

* FOREST MAXWELL

* EARL MERRITT

* RICHARD MI(HERDZINSKI

* FREDERICK MICHELS

* JAMES MILLER * SAMUEL MORGANTE * LEO MURPHY * J. T. McCARTHY

* RUDULPH MILLER * WILFRED MORIN * JOHN MURRAY * TYRIL McCOY

* HOWARD MIllER

MICHAELS

* ROBERT MOHR

* WALTER MORDAUNT

WILLIAM M ILLER . HARRY M ILOFSKY

* ROBERT MORRISSEY

* SAMUEL MUNICH * JACK MURPHY

GLENN MORRISON

* CHARLES McCARTHY

* JOSEPH McALLISTER

* JOHN McBRIDE

STUART MYERS

* HENRY

* ROBERT McDOWELL

* PAUL McMAHON

* DANIEL McNERNEY

* WALTER McVEE

JOHN McDONALD

* EDWARD NELSON

* JOSEPH NEUHAUSER

* JOHN NEFF

* HARRY NELSON

* ELMER NEUREUTHER

NAWOTKA

* EARL OBERMEYER .. DANIEL O'DONNElL

* FRANK Nuns * JOSEPH OLIVER

* STEVEN NYITRAI

*

LAURENCE NEWCOMB .. JOHN NICHOLS

* CHESTER OLENIACZ

* ROY OREN· * ARTHUR * ROBERT PECK

* CLARENCE OLSON

DONALD OGLEVEE

PATRICK' O 'SULLIVAN

* J. ALLEN OWEN

* LeGRAND OWEN * JOSEPH PATTI

* GEORGE PAGAN * JACK PATTYSON

* CHESTER PALKA * JAMES PECK

DORF • WALTER ORING

PANKOW. HARRY PARKER * ROBERT PA TELUNAS

* JACK PERMAN

* WILLIAM PERRY * HAROLD PETERSON * KENNETH PHILLIPS

I '

GLENWOOD PENSLIEN • ALFRED PERKINS

* JOHN PIATAK * GEORGE PIEPER

* PATRIC\( PINTO

* JEANNE PIPER

* PHILIP * WYATT * ANNE

* NATHAN PLATT

ROBERT PHILLIPS

* KAREN POPP

* ESTELLE PORCHER

* RAYMOND PORTER. ROBERT POTTER * SALVATORE PULEO .. ROBERT QUERNS

POHLMAN. LLOYD POLLOCK

* ERBY POWELL • O . K. PRENTICE

* DAVID PRITCHARD

POTTER

* ALAN RAMM

* HOWARD RANDALL

* SHERWOOD QUICK .. JERRY RAIKEN • MORRIS RAIKEN

QUINLAN

* ROY REED

* WILBUR * FRANKLIN * RALPH

A. MORTON RAYCH • J. DONALD RAYNOR • WALLACE REDMAN • MALCOLM REDMARE

* ROBERT REIST

* ARTHUR RESSING • ASBERY REYNOLDS

* HELEN REYNOLDS

REESE • NANCY REID

* PAUL RICOTTA .. GEORGE RILEY ·* RAYMOND RINDFUSS

* HARRY ROBERTS

* LEWIS RINDONE

RICHARDS

* WILLI AM ROCHELLE

* WERNER ROGERS

* JACK ROMANIUK • JOSEPH ROMANO

ROBERTSON. LANORA ROBINSON EARL ROOD • . CASS ROONEY

* HAROLD ROSENBAUM

* PAUL ROONEY

* BENJAMIN ROSENTHAL

* BARLTETT ROSS

* CHARLES ROSS

* ROSS ROWLEY * FREDERICK RUBENS • JOSEPH RUfFINO * GEORGE RYNDERS. DAVID SANfORD

* BERNARD ROST'AD

BEVERLY ROSS

* SAMUEL RUSSO

* CLYDE RUTTENBER • ALBERT RYDZYNSKI * LEWIS SMITH . WILLIAM SPALDING

DONALD RUNYAN

* GILBERT TAUFfNER

* JAMES TEICH·

MONTfORD SCHRADER . AARON SIMON

* RALPH THEOBALD

* RALPH THOMAS

MANN • EAR·L TELSCHOW • RICHARD TEMLITZ

EUGENE THOMPSON

* LESTER TOKARS * EDGAR TULLOCH * JOSEPH VARGA

* INA TRACY • SAMUEL TRIPPE

* GEORGE TROMBLEY • ROBERT TRUDEL

ROBERT TlMERSON MARVIN TRUDELL WALTER VAN BUREN

* EUGENE URBANSKI * MARIE VIOX * DONALD VOLTZ

* HAROLD ULRICH * LOUIS VASTOLA

* NELSON UPTON * RALPH UPTON

* THOMAS VER HAGE * NELSON VOGHT

* JOSEPH VERBA * GORDON VOGHT

* ROLLIN VOGAN .. DONALD VOGHT

LEON VIVIER

GEORGE WAGNER. RAYMOND WAGNER * FRANCES WANDELL . FREDERICK WARREN GRACE WATROUS. ROBERT WATSON. CECILE WATT. SHERILL WEBB. CARL WEBER. LEO WEBER. EDWIN G. WEINHEIMER. JOEL WEISBERG. REX WEIST. JOHt-I· WELCH. GERALD WELSTED * JAMES WERICK. GRANT WETT· LAUFER • JEROME WILKER • LEONARD WIELOPOLSKI • EDGAR WILLI AMS • MERRELL WILLI AMS • ROGER WILLIS CLAYTON WILSON * STANLEY WITMEYER * KENNETH WITTER • HENRY WOJCIKI • JOHN WOLF • ROBERT WOLF· JOHN WOLANYK * ROBERT WOOD * DAVID WOODCOCK * HAROLD WOOLCOTT * JOHN WUJEK • MICHAEL WOV· KULICH. FRANCIS WYROBA • STEPHEN YURANOVICH • ERNEST ZASADA. RAY ZIER * HERBERT ZOLLITSCH • DAVID ZWICK. ALICE ACQUARD * JOHN ARMSTRONG * DAVID BORCHARD * ROBERT FILER. EVERETT JENNINGS * RAY· MONO KENDALL * NORBERT LYNCH. PATRICIA NICHOLS * GERALD WOLF. EDWARD ZIEGLER * STANLEY SACHA ARTHUR SAGER * VINCENT SAIA * ALDEN SALLACK • EUGENE SALTARELLI * ELWOOD SAMSON * WILLARD SAUTER HUBERT SAYLOR * MARJORIE SCH A AF * ALAN SCHAEFER * MELVIN SCH APIRO * JOHN SCHASSAR * GRACE SCHENK CHARLES SCHILLING. JOHN SCHLOERB • CHESTER SCHOENBORN * DONALD SCHOLZ * MARLON SCHRIEBER * RAY· MONO SCHULTZ. ROBERT SCHULTZ. NORMAN SCHUSSLER * JOSEPH SCHWARTZ * WILLIAM SCHWIER. WILLIAM SDAO '. GLEN SEAMAN. HOWARD SENGBUSCH • CLEON ?ERVICE • ALLAN SEXTON * FRE[!)ERICI( SHAW • . GOR· DON SHAW • WILLIAM SHELDON * ROBERT SHEPPARD • FRANCIS SIEMANKOWSKI * WILLIAM SION • FRED SIXT • GEORGE SKINNER • GERALD SKINNER * WALTER SLADE * ARTHUR SMITH * DAVID SMITH • RALPH SMITH • ROLAND SMITH * ALLEN SMUKLER • SAM SNITZER * FRANK SNYDER • CHARLES SODERLUND DAVID SPEAKMAN. GILMORE SPEAR. HARRY SPURR • HENRY STACKOWICZ • MERWIN, STAINES. CHESTER STANKO R. H. STELLRECHT * KENNETH STENZEL * EVERETT STEVENSON .• HARRY STEVENSON • JOHN STEWART • DELLZON STOKES • RICHARD STOTTLER • DAVID STREBE * HARRY STRICKLAND • . GRACE STRONG • ROBERT STRUNK • JOSEPH STURM * JOSEPH SULLIVAN * WINFORD SWANSON. RICHARD SWART. HUBERT SWIFT. JAMES SWEET * CHESTER SWIERCZYNSKI * BERNARD SWln • CARL SWIFT • JOHN SYKES • ROBERT SYLVES * JOSEPHINE SYRACUSE • STEPHEN SZAFRON • EDWARD SCYMANSKI * THEY SERVE * THEY SERVE. THEY SERVE * THEY SERVE. THEY SERVE * THEY * BERNARD WAMBSGANSS

._________

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The Society encourages well– directed student activities and high standards in existing or– ganizations. Alpha practices what she preaches too, for she annually sponsors Leadersh ip and Organization Days, as well as the traditional Holly Hanging

ALPHA HONOR SOCIETY

Ta ke a gaod look at the students pic– tured on this page . They are the leaders at State, and the members of Alpha Society. Each Spring a limited number of Juniors and Seniors who have shown outstanding leadership in College ac– tivities, are tapped for membership

Operating the ever frequented Bureau of Instructional Materials is their big job, It is not widely known that the Bureau is run independently ·of the main library and the management of it falls to student organizations which have shown leadership and ability. Every year, during National Education Week, Kappa Delta Pi really goes to town. This past year was no exception

KAPPA DELTA PI

Kappa Delta Pi is an early bird organ– ization - for most of its meetings are held by the dawn 's early light. It is a National Educational Fraternity which fosters fellowsh ip, schola rs hip and achievement in educational work. Mem– bership in this organization is limited to students with above average grades

NU LAMBDA SIGMA

Nu Lambda Sigma counts among its members superior E ngli~h students pos– sessing a keen interest in lit erature. This year, as in few years before, Nu Lamb has been a powerful force behind The Record, its members contributing to the paper regularly . At the meetings them– selves, discussions have waxed hot and heavy on such controversial subjects as James Farre ll, Robinson Jeffers, and D. H. Lawrence. A new innovation was the disClJssion of other Art Forms, show– ing their direct relation to litera ture. Long to be remembered was the read– ing of their own poetry by members

The Pan-Hellenic Organi– zation is a federation of all the women's Greek let– ter organizations on cam– pus. It consists of members from each sorority who regulate and thresh out the peculiarities of sorority life . Pan-Hell's party for girls interested in sororities annually acquaints the girls with their future sis– ters. This year Pan-Hel– lenic took on a new job, that of distributing the stu– dent directory, in addition to their old job of running a war stamp-bond booth

PHI UPSILON OMICRON

Membership in Phi Upsilon Omicron Honorary Sorority is limited to those Home Econ.omics students who · have shown superior scholastic ability, integrity of character and qualities of leadership. During the College year, the girls have participated in a national program for Consumer Education and supervised refreshment serving at the Freshman Tea . Most memor– able of all Phi U's many activities this year, was their sponsorship of the Charm School

PAN-HELLENIC

This year has been momentous in the history of Pi Pi Chapter of Alpha Sig, for this Fall they opened their new house on Tudor Place, a haven of hospitality for our boys home on leave. Here they held their iolly holiday dance with Christmas presents for everyone. Here they held their annual Father's Day Tea. Here in a more serious mood they have contributed time and effort to war service. They have sponsored a "Cards to the Boys Cam– paign." They have collected money for Russian Relief. And always there has been a zippy Alpha Sig way of accomplishment

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

However, Alpha Sigma Tau has been doi~g some behind the scenes work which perhaps you haven't heard about. The girls have addressed copies of The Record to former State men every– where in service. They have assisted their faculty sponsor, Dr. Quayle, in keepi'ng the many and complicated service files up ta date. Thus our servicemen have been assured of receiving the various pieces of mail sent to them from the College - and promptly. This sorority has done everything expected of it

ALPHA SIGMA TAU

Year after year, Alpha Sigma Tau presents a one hundred dollar scholarship to a deserving non-sorority girl. This has become a tradition at State. They, too, have entered the sorority fashion parade, stealing the show with their tastefully selected outfits

Arethusa Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Epsilon Sorority came to State only eighteen years ago, but in that short pe– riod of time they have built up an honorable record. Besides offering the Bishop Honor Medal, which recognizes superior pro– fessional ability, the sorority has acquired a charming house on Lincoln Parkway, a center of fine hospitality. They have a way of getting things done. No one ca'n deny the clever originality of their servicemen's birthday cards, but even more important to those men in service was their sponsoring of the annual Red Cross Drive . No one can or cares to deny Delta Sig 's loyalty to State

DELTA SIGMA EPSILON

Pi Kappa Sigma Sorority is about as different an organization as you'll ever run into, Its members accomplish much with seemingly little effort. Pi Kap was the official College greeter to the boys in service, At Christmas and at Easter time, appropriate cards were addressed and sent out. Their apple sucker booth, and their quaint stand at the "Y" Carnival were well patronized, A great achievement of Pi Kap's - support of the war bond and stamp drive

, '

PI KAPPA SIGMA

State has good cause to be proud of Tri– Sig Sorority. Always active in the field of social service, this year Zeta Chapter has worked hard on the adopted school project in Argentina . Their promotion of the Cheer Fund, coordinating unit of all servicemen's committees, was unbeat– able at State in 1943-1944. The girls have ro lled out the mat at their new house on Dorchester Rd. And State will always roll out its welcome mat for them

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA

THETA SIGMA UPSILON •

We here at State Teachers Col lege take great pride in Theta Sigma Upsilon Sorority . During this past year, Theta Sigs have made a contribution to the Col lege upon which no price cou ld be set. Their assembling of the College Scrap Book has been a huge job. In it are contained letters from our boys in service, c lippings about them, pictures of them and the ir · experiences. Sorority spirit and cooperation has risen to new heights th·is year, with every undertaking being successfully concluded. Theta Sig looks forward to many big years at State and we are looking forward with them to a fulfillment of their ideals

SIGMA TAU GAMMA

There is a bit of remorse in Sig Tau's hearts because it is impos– sible to keep up the life giving element of rivalry with the other fraternities on ourCollegecampus

Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity has en– deavored to keep the fraternity spirit alive through this trying period . The Tremont Avenue frat house is the nu– cleus of tnis spirit. It is a reference tie to old acquaintances, for men on furlough and a meeting place for members on campus. The annual fraternity White Rose Boll was held again this year in the gym with Marty Albright queen

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Music by Jeanne Jettes, Class of 1944

Words by Betty Germoney, Class of 1944

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As you've turned the pages of this -book you've probably noticed several organizations con– spicuous by their absence. The members of Psi Phi and Delta Kappa Fraternities, and of the Men's Glee Club have for the most -part entered the armed services. These organizations have gone inactive for the durat ion. That they will not be forgotten we sa lute them here, if on ly by the mention of their memory recalling names

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We of the dass of '44 can nev.r put down on paper our feeling of gratitude to you boys who have left our campus 10 flght the war of survival All we con do is repeot again the he(lUtifu l HYMN FOR OUR SOYS, and by it re– affirm that you are always in our prayers

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ART EDUCATION CLUB

Art Ed Club is a popular organi– zation, They plan successful ac– tivities, and they have fun doing it, Unforgettable this year was their Surrealist Ball, with cos– tumes out of this world , Art Ed.'s Bohemian Bazaar is al – ways a hit. It is then that the . members sell their priceless arty work for a song, acquaint the rest of the College with their mysterious, amazing way of hav– ing fun beautifying their lives

The 1944 Elms has been pro– duced under great difficulties . Members of the staff have worked hard, and long, What you, our friends, see in this year– book is the result of that effort

RECORD

HANDBOOK

The Record is the tie between the Col– lege ond tbe student body. It is the medium of student opinion, the record of college activities. It brings us news of our boys in service. It comments on matters of professional and even world events. Never before has a Record staff struggled to overcome greater handi– caps. This year, there was more news and less space in which to write i·t. For the first time in history, The Record was printed outside the College entailing greater expense ond necessitating few– er issues . But despite all this, The Record has had a good year. A steady im– provement from issue to issue, plus a special servicemen's number have made this year's Record noteworthy. The 1943-44 Record has tried to be a pro– gressive one. May the coming year find it steadily marching forward at State

The Handbook is the Freshman's Bible. Published annually by students with the backing of the Publications Committee, the Handbook contains information about customs, College tra– ditions, academic regulations. It describes n~t only the activities of the College but also the character of its institutions . The Handbook is as valuable to upperclassmen as to Freshmen

FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB

The Foreign language Club has had a varied season, this past College year, if nothing else. Under the direction of Dr. Messner and Mildred Sharick, club members have gone all out for French War Relief. Clothing has been shipped to the Red Cross, and directly to French Aviation Cadets. Also books and other. reading matter. But the Foreign language Club is not interested in French alone. A special- latin party was held, and was adiudged a big hit. A repeat performance is promised soon. Spanish and German were also given the attention which they deserve - a club .meeting being conducted in eath of these two languages. The Foreign language Club sets no high standards for admission-merely an interest in foreign languages

The Non-Resident Association is an or– ganization limited in membership, as the name implies, to women attending State and living away from home . The NRA acts as a Travel Bureau, giving directions, helpful hints, and · making away-from-home girls feel at home. Be– cause of the energy expended by club members, their annual toy drive at Christmas time went over the top. All year long NRA has had lots of fun hiking, bowling, and dancing together

NON-RESIDENT ASSOCIATION

FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA

Future Teachers of America is more' important now than ever before in its history. This organi– zation is deeply concerned with the impending teacher shortage. Speakers a'nd panel discus– sions have played a prominent part in the presenting of the facts of the problem. It is up to FTA and the College in general to solve it. Future Teachers of America which has been in existence at State for only three years has vowed that it will not let young America down, and that it will make every effort to raise the standards of our chosen profession of teaching

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB

You probably couldn't tell by looking at its members, but the Home Economics Club is one of the oldest organizations in existence at State Teachers College today. With the aid of guest speakers and intra organization discussions,. they lived up to their purpose-of promoting the work of Home Economics, and fos– tedng friendship among its members. The girls sewed while they worked, their biggest task, mending swim suits

DRAMATIC CLUB

\ To become a member of the Club on\e must earn his way . He may build scen ~ ery, sew on costumes, apply make-up, gather properties, help with lights, or- ' just plain perform on the stage . What \ the playgoer never sees, are the things \ that make Dramatic Club productions l, so polished . May their success, the re- \ suit of much behind·the-scenes work, "\ and more work, last through the years

You can't put your finger on it-but there's something unusual about the loyalty of the members to their Dramatic Club. It might be those all-night rehearsals, those late suppers, or even that moment just before the show goes on . But whatever it is, it enables the Dramatic Club to keep up a high standard of per– formance even in these difficult times. The club reached new heights this year with Once a Pupil and Ladies in Retirement

FRESHMAN WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB

Many a girl has chosen State as her college for the sole privilege of singing in the Girls' Glee Club . It has, there– fore, a good name in the community as well as on campus, and is a training ground for future musical· education. Under the leadership of Miss McMahon, the Freshman Women's Glee Club's public debut at the Christmas Festival will be long remembered for its excel– lence and workmanlike performance

Seven years at State-that's the enviable record of the Newman Club. One of the later clubs to be or– ganized, it · has iumped to the foreground through the never-flagging interest and sincerity of its mem– bers, and the zeal of its Moderator, Father Dempsey. Newman Club was formed to promote Catholic cul– ture, fellowship, and social development among the Catholic students of the College. This past year it has done all these things and more. Something about which you might have heard little, are the regular Co mmu n ion s offered for State men in service

NEWMAN CLUB

SENIOR WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB

Senior Women 's Glee Club has had a glorious record here at State. This year, under a new director, they have risen to new levels of musical expression. Their harmonizing at the Christmas Festival was just what it should have been, and then some. During the Lenten Season and particularly at the special religious devotions, the Senior Women's Glee Club's devo'ut interpretation of the old familiar hymns left a long lasting mark on the College

The newly reorganized Athletic Organization is two years old. It is their chief function to guide and supervise all athletic activ– ity on campus. Those combina – tion informal basketball games, swimming meets, and dances were the pride and joy of our own competent AA. Athletic As– sociation arranged schedules for all tour~aments, and made avail– able toboggans for student use

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

For Student Council, 1943-44 was a dream come true. After years of prom– ise and frustration, Council came into its own this year. With a smaller gov– erning body than eve r before, it has been able to get things done. Direct student opinion and interest were so– licited by the installing of a Suggestion Box in the Student Center. By popular request a Smoking Room supervised by members of Student Council was opened; new student mailbox regula– tions were made and enforced. In the Spring came Class elections guided by our own new College Association-at last a power, no longer just a name

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COLLEGE ASSOCIATION

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