Arizona Hearing Center - April 2020

Did you know that there are over 2.5 million acres of garlic in cultivation worldwide? It’s no wonder: Garlic boasts a fascinating history, has unparalleled health benefits, and is used in so many different types of cuisine around the world. Plus, garlic just makes recipes tasty! National Garlic Day is April 19, so here are some facts to help you brush up on your knowledge and celebrate it to the fullest. Humans have been using garlic for a variety of purposes for over 5,000 years. It originated in central Asia and rapidly spread to many civilizations and cultures around the world. Its nutritional and remedial benefits quickly made it popular in recipes, medicine, and even magic potions. Its pungent aroma was thought to ward off evil beings like witches and vampires, and ancient Greek warriors ate it to instill strength and courage. Egyptians worshiped the plant and even used it as local currency. It’s still loved by many today, though it is primarily used for cooking. Throughout history, garlic has been used to treat wounds, cure asthma, combat diseases, and even fight gangrene. Today, its recognized health benefits are a little more practical but no less astounding. Garlic contains vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that can boost immunity, reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol, promote healthy hair and skin, and fight fungus and bacteria. The best way to take advantage of these benefits is by eating it raw, but if you can’t deal with the lingering stinky breath, following proper cooking methods can still yield healthy results. And Everything We Love About It GOOD OL’ GARLIC History Health

DO YOU NEED SPACE TO START YOUR BUSINESS? Make Your Dream a Reality by Visiting Your Local Makerspace

As an entrepreneur, starting your own business and chasing your dreams is an exciting prospect. But as you begin your small-business journey, questions involving costs, sales, and distribution will fill your head, and their answers often require time-consuming research that might feel discouraging. It may seem like you have to build everything on your own, but luckily, there are communities all over the country for aspiring entrepreneurs to come together and help each other achieve success. They’re called makerspaces, and there is probably one located near you! Makerspaces are community workshops where creative minds and entrepreneurs can build products that may never see the light of day otherwise. They exist in a variety of environments, including stand-alone offices and shared spaces inside libraries and schools. They provide access to a wide range of resources, including power tools, sewing machines, 3D printers, and so much more. In addition to equipment, most makerspaces host classes, like the basics of welding or bookkeeping, for tradespeople and entrepreneurs alike. Makerspaces also act as hubs for collaboration. Do you need an engineer to guide the design of your product? How about a graphic designer to brainstorm with about your logo? You'll likely find them in makerspaces because these communities support passionate people from a variety of backgrounds. In addition to resources and know-how, members can use the space to build prototypes at a fraction of what their development would typically cost. In an interview with NPR, Mark Hatch, author of “The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers,” said, "When you move the cost of entrepreneurship from $100,000 to $2,000–$4,000, you completely change the operating terrain for entrepreneurs and inventors." While membership costs to makerspaces generally range from $40–$175 per month, the price is well worth the investment. And if you find one in your local public library, membership may even be included with your library membership. If you’re struggling to start your business, know that you’re not alone. With the support and collaboration you can find in a makerspace, you can make your dreams a reality. To find a space near you, visit Makerspaces.Make.co.

How-Tos

When buying garlic, avoid shriveled or soft bulbs. Its shelf life is roughly eight weeks if the skin is unbroken, and around two weeks for individual cloves. Garlic works well in recipes that call for its relatives, like onions, shallots, and leeks. When cooking with garlic, the finer you mince and

mash, the more flavor you’ll get. You should also let your garlic rest between chopping and cooking, and add it to the pan near the end of the recipe to better

preserve its nutrients and flavor. Garlic breath can often be combated with a little bit of lemon juice, but if you’d rather let it

linger and savor the flavor, your secret is safe with us!

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