North County Water & Sports Therapy February 2019

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Monday—Friday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 858-675-1133 www.waterpt.com

15373 Innovation Dr. #175 San Diego, CA 92128

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

1

Travels Far and Farther

2

Candy-Free Valentines

Patient Success Story

3

Healing Tips: What Helps and What Hinders

Spicy Salmon Tartare

4

Cultural Treasures in Balboa Park

FOUR 20TH-CENTURY MASTERPIECES AT THE SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART

THE WHITE FLOWER BY GEORGIA O’KEEFFE (1932)

Since its founding in 1926, the San Diego Museum of Art has been one of the city’s premier cultural institutions. Home to great works from all over the world and every era of art history, it’s impossible to provide even a cursory overview of the collection in the space we have here. Instead, we decided to highlight four works that never fail to stop us in our tracks.

Few artists — if any — have restructured the way we think about the American landscape like Georgia O’Keeffe. Her paintings of New York City and New Mexico perfectly capture urban and rural life. In addition to being a landscape painter of the first order, O’Keeffe was fascinated by the power and beauty of flowers, which were a staple subject in her work. It’s amazing how much meaning she was able to wrench from such familiar source material. There are 10 of Tamayo’s works in the museum’s collection — a fitting tribute to the innovative Mexican artist — but it’s “The Somnambulist” that knocks everyone out (excuse the pun). Many people find abstract art obtuse or impenetrable, but Tamayo manages to effortlessly evoke the sensation of sleepwalking (somnambulism) with little more than some deftly placed lines of paint. THE SOMNAMBULIST BY RUFINO TAMAYO (1954)

RED BLOSSOM BY ALEXEJ VON JAWLENSKY (1910) A gift in 2011 bestowed the museum with an incredible array of German Expressionism, including works by Otto Dix, Gustav Klimt, and Egon Schiele.

CAGED PIE BY WAYNE THIEBAUD (1962) As the 20th century neared its closing decades, art transitioned from the abstract to the conceptual. Wayne Thiebaud’s “Caged Pie” is a wonderful example of the latter, featuring an appetizing slice of cherry pie enclosed within an impenetrable glass container. Nearly every visitor to the museum will have a different interpretation of this image, each as thought-provoking as the last.

Even among this august pantheon, Alexej von Jawlensky’s “Red Blossom” stands out. Jawlensky was a member of the Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider) group, which promoted the bold use of color and shape typical of the expressionist movement.

To learn more about the works on view at the San Diego Museum of Art, visit sdmart.org today.

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