The Elder Care Firm October 2018

Plan. Protect. Preserve.

OFFICES: Brighton | Bloomfield Hills | Livonia | Novi

CHANGE AS WE AGE DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES

Ryan entered the long hallway, inching warily toward the light in the distance. As he neared the flickering candle he noticed a skeleton wearing a long, black coat. The skeleton stood just out of reach and pulled out the skull of Madison, Ryan’s sister, from inside his coat. With a maniacal laugh, the skeleton cocked his arm back and threw the skull at Ryan. Or at least that’s what he told me after he woke up. Pretty wild dream for an 8-year-old, right? The way he told me about it, you’d think he was describing a scene from a horror movie. Thankfully, Ryan was not unnerved by the nightmare after he realized it wasn’t real. His take on the matter? “Dad, that was weird.” In our house, the boys have a habit of waking up before the girls, which means Ryan and I often spend the morning discussing our dreams with one another. It’s really interesting to compare

the nature of his dreams to my own. While Ryan is traveling to far-off lands and hanging with skeletons, I’m back in high school, panicked over the fact that I can’t remember my locker combination. I’m no Sigmund Freud, but I think it’s safe to assume that where you are in your life has a huge impact on what shows up in your dreams. That’s certainly how it works with financial fears. At different stages of your life, you’re worried about different concerns. Young couples who are just starting a family are thinking about how to pay for their kids’ college and who will take care of them if something happens. At that time, planning usually takes the form of thinking decades into the future and trying to set your family up for long-term stability and success. As you get older, the future starts to become the present. Those approaching retirement want to know how they can set themselves up for a fruitful

post-work life, however long that may be. As we get older, we also start thinking about probate, long-term care costs, and other aspects of later-life planning. No matter your particular financial worries, the best way to assuage them is to proactively plan. Just like the killers in slasher films, real-life worries are a lot scarier when they’re left to operate in the shadows. Taking the time to talk about your fears surrounding financial and estate planning is an important part of the process. Fear, after all, can provide just as much motivation as desire. When you take the time to create a comprehensive, holistic financial plan, you address not just the fears you have now, but also those you’ll have in the future. This year, as you hang up your cobwebs and carve your jack-o’-lanterns, ask yourself if you have any potential financial monsters hiding under your bed. There’s no better time to pull them into the light than today.

“I’m no Sigmund Freud, but I think it’s safe to assume that where you are in your life has a huge impact on what shows up in your dreams. That’s certainly how it works with financial fears.”

Now, if we could only get that dang skeleton to stop throwing skulls at my son.

– Christopher J. Berry

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Plan. Protect. Preserve.

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