tgg NSBE Strategic Direction Synthesis mh 4-9-2020 v. 5

2020 NSBE Strategic Planning Journey Strategic Direction Draft

April 2020

Jocelyn Jackson National Chair Karl Reid, Ed.D. Executive Director

Milano Harden President & CEO Reggie Hammond Senior Consultant The Genius Group, Inc/TGG Metro Atlanta, GA USA www.thegeniusgroup.com

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READY! PRE-COLLEGIATE ENGAGEMENT: Helping NSBE Pre-Collegiate Be READY & RISE!

Pre-Collegiate students from K to successful high school graduates represents NSBE future’s promise and supply of potential collegiate students. However, systematically exposing, engaging and preparing these students across the early developmental and academic life span takes a variety of distinct engagement, academic/learning and enrichment strategies and tactics, best delivered by prepared, well-trained and energetic NSBE student and professional member-volunteers. The Pre-Collegiate Strategic Direction workgroup especially acknowledged the importance of segmenting this broad age-early interest continuum into 4 core age/grade oriented groups - K-Grade 2, Grade 3 rd -5 th (SEEK Students) and Grades 6 th -8 th Grade (NSBE Jr.) and finally a high school grouping Grades 9 th – 12 th (NSBE Jr. Chapters and early Collegiate Chapter partner). Each group would receive different exposures, engagements, level of mentorship/tutoring or other supports. The end-game is to use this period to create deep academic readiness and career interest in Engineering academic programs and/or STEM careers.

Program Activity & Description

Member / Stakeholder Engagement

Vehicle for Implementation

Age/Grade Segment

Informal Program; Not capturing member, not members of NSBE

Chapter Leadership Chapter members, especially those in gateway courses in their major Graduate students (as facilitators) Upperclassmen (as facilitators) Multicultural Program Administrator (MEP) (help structure group sessions, and perhaps compensate facilitators, recruiting facilitators, provide, orientation, training, etc.) Chapter Leadership Chapter members Mentor other schools to grow camps Churches Areas with high UR students Area growth focus vs national growth focus

Kindergarten – 2 nd Grade

Need to use more data… tracking student’s lifecycle. Prepare student-centric toolkits to implement and the following program elements: • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample Budgets • Case Studies

SEEK – Flagship Program • Host Schools • Education and Industry Partners • Mentors/Advisors • Other Schools Build out key targeted areas

3r d Grade – 5 th Grade Seek started in 2007

2018 Seek had 15 camps in 13 Cities

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Grow stakeholders via Universities, industry, etc. Growth with other URM from 50K Partners – Collective impact. Parents, family & friends Advisors WHQ NEB Collegiate Chapters Host Schools/Companies

• Evaluation Forms Create tracking systems (e.g., align Activity Reports with these data More Chapter focus. Basic STEM educations More Engineering concepts earlier More growth, attention span and excitement Exposure to role models and others (family, friends, etc.) College visits - HBCUs, etc. (NSBE chapters and Univ. partners with existing K-12 programs) Word of mouth - need broader awareness/marketing plan and approach New Model: Sponsor, Student, Advisors, etc. with a strategic communications plan to achieve College ready for Engineering.

5139 NSBE Jr. Members - Grades 3 - 12 NSBE Jr. started in 1990 PCI started 1988

6 th Grade- 8 th Grade – NSBE Jr.

More competition (engaged with alumni and collegiate) More scholarships (prep for college) More engineering foundations curriculum/concepts

Universities. Academic Industry partners/BCA Collegiate chapters Role Models

9 th Grade – 12 th Grade – NSBE JR. TO Collegiate

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SET! SCHOLASTIC ACHIEVEMENT: Helping NSBE Collegiate Graduate with 3.2 GPA or Better Scholastic Achievement is both the Floor and the Ceiling – the foundation and springboard for a vibrant Engineering or STEM career. A recent NSBE study found that collegiate chapters that: • host Study Groups for math, science, engineering, computer science and other subjects; and • promote Skills Development Workshops that teach study and career skills On average, seize scholastic achievement’s crown-ring - a higher Grade Point Average (GPA) than those chapters that don’t. Higher GPAs correlate with higher graduation rates. Additionally, studies show that improving faculty engagement increases retention and academic success. These targeted, evidence-based, chapter-focused strategies are the center-piece of NSBE’s new strategic direction to foster academic success, faculty engagement and appreciably advance NSBE toward its 2025 goal.

Descriptions

Member / Stakeholder Engagement

Suggested Changes Necessary Prepare student-centric toolkits to implement and assess the following program elements: • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample budgets • Case studies • Evaluation forms Create incentives Create tracking systems (e.g., align Activity Reports with these data) Prepare student-centric toolkits to implement and the following program elements: • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample Budgets • Case Studies • Evaluation Forms Create incentives.

Program Activity

Study groups are regularly scheduled study sessions for engineering students to increase course material understanding especially challenging concepts. Typically facilitated by graduate students or upperclassmen with demonstrated subject matter proficiency, these groups complement the lecture and recitation with supplemental instruction and problem- solving. Chapter members should self- organize study groups around specific courses, whether or not upperclassmen, graduate students and post-doctorates are available. The key is utilizing the study groups to reinforce the learning you do on your own, rather than just seeing it as a homework aid. (See below for details)

Chapter Leadership Chapter members, especially those in gateway courses in their major Graduate students (as facilitators) Upperclassmen (as facilitators) Multicultural Program Administrator (MEP) (help structure group sessions, and perhaps compensate facilitators, recruiting facilitators, provide, orientation, training, etc.)

Facilitated Study Groups

Chapter Leadership Chapter members

Self-Organized Study Groups

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Create tracking systems (e.g., align Activity Reports with these data) Prepare student-centric toolkits to implement and the following program elements: • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample Budgets • Case Studies • Evaluation Forms Create incentives. Create tracking systems (e.g., align Activity Reports with these data) Prepare student-centric toolkits to implement and the following program elements: • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample Budgets • Case Studies • Evaluation Forms Create incentives Create tracking systems (e.g., align Activity Reports with these data) Prepare student-centric toolkits to implement and assess this program. • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample Budgets • Case Studies • Evaluation Forms

Learning how to learn is critical for college success. These workshops focus on teaching students how to work smarter, not just harder. (See below for details)

Chapter Leadership Chapter members, especially freshmen, and sophomores in gateway courses in their major Graduate students (as facilitators) Upperclassmen (as facilitators) Chapter Advisor Chapter Leadership. Chapter members, especially freshmen, and sophomores in gateway courses in their major Chapter Advisor. Multicultural Program Administrator (MEP) (help structure group sessions, and perhaps compensate them, multicultural orientation, training, etc.) Faculty who are aware of NSBE and supporting programming Chapter Leadership Chapter Members Upperclassmen and Graduate Students (to serve as mentors) Faculty mentors

Study Skills Workshops

NSBE chapters should increase engagement with faculty and administration on campus to foster success and confidence. (See below for details.)

Foster MEP and Faculty Engagement

Students with mentors adjust better to college, feel more supported, and have greater academic program satisfaction . Having mentors that students can identify builds self-efficacy.

Mentoring

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Therefore, chapters should establish mentoring relationships between upper- and lower- classmen, and between students and faculty (group mentoring).

Create incentives Create tracking systems

GO! - PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT: Helping NSBE Professionals Succeed & Soar!! NSBE has a unique opportunity to help its Professional members soar in their careers and the experience of work. By supporting Professional members having a positive view of their abilities, and helping them access NSBE’s network of accomplished Black Engineering/STEM mentors, these members can experience their career journey as a unique opportunity to continue to achieve high performance, develop and tackle meaningful career goals, and positively impact society especially by “giving back” to the NSBE community. Career development researchers study the paths professionals take toward improved career trajectory, professional growth and overall job satisfaction. Most acknowledge the importance of two goals - cultivating a positive emotional relationship with one’s work, and developing personally meaningful professional ambitions. In particular, Albert Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory is helpful for re-imagining ways to improve NSBE’s professional members’ experiences. Bandura asserts that most individuals’ motives and behaviors are based on three categories of socially influencing experiences. Individuals are influenced by: • Their Self-efficacy, or what they believe they can achieve; • What they see other people achieve and the actions they take (i.e. mentors and peers). • Factors around them that they cannot control (i.e. for African Americans this conjures realities like implicit bias, structural racism and other systemic disadvantages). By NSBE re-imagining its professional and career development experiences, and re-deploying its previously event-centered activities, it can more deftly meet professional members’ needs. Moreover, the Professionals strategic direction (proposed by SPTF Professionals workgroup) asserts that by better understanding these members’ unique needs and better targeting supports at key defining stages (i.e. early, mid and late career) and critical turns (i.e. key moments of decision), NSBE can add new, compelling value to its Professional members.

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Focusing on the FIRST FIVE: Supporting Young Technical Professionals

Typically, NSBE key member activities can be very event-focused. This emphasis can leave more systematic, evidence-informed programming in the background. However, select Pre-Collegiate (READY!) and Collegiate (SET!) activities benefit from evidence-informed, meaningful programming. Given these precedents, the Professional SPTF workgroup felt it important for NSBE Professionals to engage NSBE (i.e. including leadership, management, and staff) to establish robust out-of-conference, repeatable event activities and programming. Currently, NSBE Professionals operate with a subtle Breadth & Depth tension. Practically, its ambitions for quality and fidelity do not correspond with its volunteer and operational capacity. However, if right-sized and re-aligned, NSBE staff could focus its energies and developing meaningful programming. For example, it could re-establish the TORCH Centers. A SMALL WIN: Programs & Activities Evaluation. To start making progress, the Workgroup suggests taking NSBE’s website-listed programs list of 12-13 programs ground an evaluation of the effectiveness of NSBE current programming to professional members. With counsel and support from NSBE’s World Headquarters, the National Programs Chair’s team would determine which programs are effective and support NSBE’s 10k Goal by 2025. On the other hand, if reviewed program activities do not support NSBE’s 10k Goal by 2025, these activities would be archived. Overtime, a broader, chapter-wide inventory of worthwhile programs would be conducted at the chapter level. MAKING MID-CAREER VITAL CONNECTIONS: SIGs, MOUs & Powerful Partnerships Because Professional members’ needs are generally non-technical (centering on establishing connections within industry), the Special Interest Groups (SIGs) can provide powerful programmatic support to the 5 – 15-year experience level. SIGs are well-positioned to help mid-career professional members make meaningful, value-adding connections to the breadth of the Engineering and STEM industry infrastructures (e.g., Government Agencies, Professional Organizations, etc.). The Workgroup saw the optimal method for forging these connections was through very specific and structured Memorandum of Understandings (MOU). Examples of partnerships might include: • an MOU/Partnership between the Entrepreneurship SIG and the Minority Business Development Agency of the Department of Commerce; • an MOU/Partnership with the Congressional Black Caucus and the Public Policy SIG. Ideally, MOU Partners would be the bride-points facilitating connections between NSBE members and leading industry organizations and interesting field initiatives. To begin this reset of the SIGs, the Professional Executive Board should evaluate the structural components around who leads SIGs, how long should they lead, and who creates their strategic direction. An annual evaluation of goals and objectives to determine impact and effectiveness, should also be included in SIG operations.

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Descriptions

Member / Stakeholder Engagement

Suggested Changes Necessary

Program Activity

Young Technical Professionals (YTP) 0-5 Years of Work Experience Post Collegiate 0-2 Years Hyper Focus of Work Experience Post Collegiate

YTPs are the programmatic focus, with a potential need to hyper-focus on the Young Professionals only 0-2 years into their early career and away from their collegiate experience. This is a critical period in career development is most important This group’s career development & transition needs will be supported by key activities with the general membership population. YTP need intentionally providing supports (i.e. safe space for “being”), lifestyle development (continued introduction to cultural experiences), technical development (skills and strategies to get ahead), and mentorship. While this group is our focus, support can be provided to membership demographics that are beyond the 5-year career experience level.

General Membership Chapter Leadership Chapter members

Conduct Assessment of currently Professional events and program activities in light of segmented Member needs/interests. Prepare professional- centric toolkits to implement and assess the following program elements: • Implementation Steps • Best practices • Sample budgets • Case studies • Evaluation forms Create incentives Create tracking systems (e.g., align Activity Reports with these data) Conduct Assessment of currently Professional events and program activities in light of segmented Member needs/interests. Communication between members, NSBE leadership and SIGs is pivotal in delivering programmatic needs

General Membership SIG Leadership MOU Partners

Mid Career Technical Professionals (MCTP) 5-15 yr. Career - Work Experience Post Collegiate

This means that a technical infrastructure that allows for constant and user-friendly communications to Professional Members is needed. This infrastructure should be accessible only to members and encompass

General Membership SIG Leadership MOU Partners

Strategic Communications Intervention & Technical-Technology Infrastructure

both inward and outward facing.

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member-only content and features. Professionals can improve upon explaining the importance of the professionals and have meaningful conversations across demographics to identify clear areas where the organization can work together to fulfill the mission.

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