1945

lE L. DESIGNED AND PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT BUFFALO' NEW YORK

THOMAS LIDDLE EDITOR - IN - CHIEF MARTHA TIEDEMANN • BUSINESS MANAGER BEATRICE PALMERTON • ART ASSOCIATE

REPRODUCED THROUGHOUT BY LITHOGRAPHY THE WILLIAM J. KElLER COMPANY • BUfFALO

TO MRS. HERTHA GANEY WE DEDICATE THE 1945 ELMS IN RECOGNI– TION OF HER AS A PERSON AS A TEACHER AND AS A FRIEND. IT IS EXTREMELY DIFFICULT TO PUT DOWN ON PAPER THE THINGS ABOUT HER WHICH MAKE HER LOVED BY BOTH STUDENTS AND FACULTY. THAT TH IS FACT IS TRUE IS MORE THAN SUFFICIENT EVIDENCE OF , HER EVENNESS AND OF OTHER PEOPLE'S TRUST IN HER ACTIONS. AS A TEACHER SHE SETS AN EXAMPLE FOR US WHO ARE JUST BE– GINNING. HER PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION WHICH COMBINES THE BEST OF THE TRADITIONAL AND THE MODERN-AND THE EXPRES– SION OF THAT PHILOSOPHY IN HER TEACHING ARE SOMETHING WELL WORTH ASPIRATION. AS A FRIEND SHE POSSESSES A SINCERE IN– TEREST IN THE INTERESTS OF HER FRIENDS, AND SOMEHOW MAN– AGES TO IMPART TO THEM HER TOLERANT, COSMOPOLITAN IDEALS

DEDICATION

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F·OREWORD

WRENCHED OUT OF ITS ONE CHANCE FOR A NORMAL COLLEGE LIFE, THE CLASS OF 1945 HAS BEEN THRUST INTO A WORLD OF INSECURITY AND INTROSPECTION AS TO WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT. WE HAVE QUESTIONED TRADI– TIONS AS TO THEIR RELATIVE VALUE IN LIGHT OF PRESENT WORLD EVENTS, AND HAVE APPRAISED THEIR WORTH– WHILENESS, AND WE HAVE FOUND IT ENCOURAGING TO REALIZE THAT IN SPITE OF DIFFICULTIES FACED OUR SENIORS ARE APPROACHING THAT ABSTRACTION CALLED THE GOOD TEACHER. WE AT BUFFALO STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE LOOK WITH PRIDE AT OUR GRADUATES IN THE TEACHING PROFESSION, KNOWING THAT THEY ARE DYNAMIC, WELL– TRAINED INFLUENCES ON CHILDREN AND EFFECTIVE MEM– BERS OF THE COMMUNITY. WE KNOW THIS BECAUSE THE STUDENTS HERE HAVE BEEN GIVEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR GROWTH, EXPERIENCES IN GROUP ACTIVITY AND A CHANCE TO DEVELOP THEIR OWN INDIVIDUALITY IN WHATEVER AREA THEY CHOSE. TO PICTURE THIS IS OUR OBJECTIVE 11

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DOCTOR ROCKWELL

WE AT STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE ARE FORTUNATE IN HAVING AS OUR PRESIDENT, A MAN WHO HAS OUR INTER– ESTS AND THE COlLEGE'S INTERESTS AT HEART_ DR. HARRY W. ROCKWELL IS A MAN OF UNUSUAL FORESIGHT AND UNDERSTANDING. HIS KNOWLEDGE OF THE WORLD SITUATION, AND ITS EFFECT ON OUR COLLEGE, IS THE RESULT OF AVID STUDY. HE 15. OUR NUMBER ONE BOOSTER, AND A PRIME EXAMPLE OF THE SUCCESS WHICH CAN COME TO A MAN THROUGH DILIGENT EFFORT. DR. ROCKWELL HAS BEEN PRESIDENT OF BUFFALO STATE TEACHERS COL– LEGE FOR MANY YEARS, YET HE HAS NEVER GIVEN UP TRYING TO MAKE IT BETTER. HIS PLANS FOR THE FUTURE INCLUDE A NEW LIBRARY, A HOME MANAGEMENT HOUSE, AND DORMITORIES. HIS PLANS SHOW MUCH CAREFUL THOUGHT AND THOROUGHNESS, WITH AN EYE TOWARD BUILDING A COLLEGE FOR THE STUDENTS. HE IS PRESIDENT OF OUR COLLEGE, AND WE TAKE GREAT PRIDE IN ACK– NOWLEDGING WHAT HE HAS DONE, WHAT HE IS DOING

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HOME ECONOMICS

left to right: Al– ma R. Roudebush, In– structor; Agnes lou– chren; Ruth Palmer, Instructor; May Nye, Instructor; Virginia Butler, Instructor; and Esther C. McGinnis

left to right: Es– ther Segner, Assis– tant Professor of Home Economics Edu– cation; Arline . John– son, Instructor; Ber– dena Dolberg;Martha S. Pratt, Head of De– po rtment; Margaret A. Grant, Instructor

INDUSTRIAL ARTS

left to right: Andrew W. Grabau, Instructor in English; George M. Quackenbush, Assistant Pro– fessor of Vocational Organization; Edward L. Morrice, Instructor in Methods; John Fontana, In– structor in Mechanics; Irving C. Perkins, Pro– fessor of Vocational Education; Walter B. Weber

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Robert E. Albright, Professor of Sociology, Director of Extension

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GEOGRAPHY

Katheryne Whittemore, Assistant Professor, Head of the Department

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Opal S. Risinger, Assistant Profes– sor Education For Physical ly Handi– capped, and Head of Department

HISTORY

Facing page, left to right: Ir– ving C. Perkins, Instructor in His– tory; Robert O. Demond, Professor of History, Head of the Department; Le!ter Mason, Assistont Professo r; Marion P. Dana, Mildred S. Roesser

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EDUCATION

At top of page: John M. Thurber, English Professor, Department Head Bottom of page, left to right; Har– old Crain, Alfred Holman, Jr., In– structors in English; Margaret Fos– ter, Assistant Professor of English

Top of page, left to right: Ches– ter Pugsley, Professor Elementary School Administration; Margaret S. Quayle, Assistant Professor of Edu– cation. Seated around table left to right: Paul W."Sloan, Prof~ssor of Education; Kate V. Wofford, Pro– fessor of Rural Education, Head of Department; Irene H. Summers, Assistant Professor of Education; Homer A. Bruce, Instructor in Educa– tion; Harry J. Steel, Professor of Education, Di rector of Placement

ENGLISH

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ART EDUCATION

Left to right: Charles B. Bradley, Professor of Art Education, Head of Department;CarolynW.Heyman, Ruth M. Karcher, Instructors in Art

Center, left to right: Stanley A. Czuries, Assistant Art Professor; D. Kenneth Winebrenner, Instructor

Lower, Albright Art School Instruc– tors: Virginia Cuthbert Elliott; Charles LeClair; Irma Seitz; David Reider; Helen Pratl. Right, Philip C. Elliott, Art School Director

MATHEMATICS

Left to right: Reuben Ebert, Pro– fessor, Head of the Deportment; Harry C. Johnson, Assistant Professor

LANGUAGES

Charles A. Messner, Professor of. Languages, Head of the Deportment

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SCHOOL OF PRACTICE

Left to right: T. Dolores Rousseau, In – structor in Sixth Grade; M. Melvina Svec, Instructor in Geography; Inez M. Knapp, Instructor in Third Grad",; Hertha Ganey, Instructor in English and Latin; Martha Metz, Instructor in First Grade; Chester A. Pugsley, Principal; Marguerite Stock– berger, Instructor in History and Social Studies; Eleanor M. Gover, Instructor in Fourth Grade; Faye Mansfield, Instructor in Second Grade; Mary Lou Jamison, Kin– dergarten Instructor, School of Practice

SCIENCE Left to right: Marchiona DiMarco, Eleanor L. Schrader, Instructors; H. Emmell Brown, Profes– sor of Science, Department Head; Raymond Fretz, Assistant Professor of Science; Margaret Dupre

Mae O'Brien, Assistant Professor of Education

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VISUAL EDUCATION

Stanley A. Czurles, Director of Visuol Education and Instruction

DRAMATICS

Mina S. Goossen, Assistant Profes– sor of Speech, Dramatics Director

HEALTH EDUCATION Left to right: Beryl E. Frech, In– structor in Health Education; Ruth E. Houston, Professor of Health Ed– ucation; Virginia Frost, Instructor

Hubert E. Coyer, Instructor, Coach

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LIBRARY

left to right: M. Frances Breen; Frances Hepinstall, librarian; Mar– ion Buchholz, Assistant librarian

OFFICE STAFF left to right: Claro E. Bauer, Stenographer for Industrial Arts Department; Mary M. May, Senior Stenographer; Rosemary Fornes, Stenog– rapher to Dr. Horn and Dr. Pugsley; Agnes H. louchren, Stenographer for Home Economics De– portment; Mary Hulse, Assistant Registrar; Jane DiAddorio, Stenographer to Miss Reed and Mrs. Kideney; Catharine Rudulph, Stenographer

PLACEMENT

left to right: Visit– ing Superintendent; Ma ry lutz Boll, Alumni and Place– ment Secretary; Harry Steel, Direc– tor of the Placement 30

REGISTRAR

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Isabel Houck Kideney, Registrar of College

HEALTH SERVICE Left to right: Doris S. Bonnar, Assistant Nurse, Marion Fox Ayers

COLLEGE CO-OP BOOKSTORE

Left to right: Charlot M. Fetterman, Manager of College Bookstore; Marietta Ferro, Assistant Manager

IN MEMORIAM

IN THE MIDST OF THIS JOYFUL YEAR-STATE TEACHERS COL– LEGE SUFFERED A LOSS IT COULD ILL-AFFORD. MRS. MARIAN CLARKE BREENE, FINANCIAL SECRETARY FOR THE PAST SEV– ERAL YEARS, PASSED ON. SHE HELD A POSITION WHICH BECAME INCREASINGLY COMPLEX WITH THE ADVENT OF THE WAR. SHE FILLED THIS POSITION CAPABLY, ACTING ALWAYS WITH THE HIGHEST PROFESSIONAL INTEGRITY. HER LOSS TO THE COLLEGE IS IRREPARABLE. OUR MEMORIES OF HER ARE PLEASANT. WE PAUSE HERE, IN MEMORY OF MRS. BREENE, AND THE IDEALS FOR WHICH SHE WORKED

Student workers, College Bookstore

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You've seen the students on these two pages before. You've se~n them in the Assembly, conducting meet– ings, acting in plays, working on the RECORD or on any publication. The members of Alpha Honor So– ciety are tapped .for their leader– ship, and for their ability to getthings done. Naturally, Alpha sponsors Leadership and Organization Days and watches all college activities

ALPHA HONOR SOCIETY

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KAPPA DELTA PI '

Yo~ j~st don't join this organiza– tion, you earn your right to mem– bership by acquiring high scholas– tic grades. Here at the College, Kappa Delta Pi recognizes that it is a National Honor Society in Ed– ucation, and holds very few social gatherings. Twice yearly they pre– sent the tea of teas-The Dean's Tea

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-No, dear Sir, Plato and Aristotle are not the names of the derby winners-they are Greek writers ... Yes, of course-not only interesting ancients, but contemporaries as Steinbeck and ·Heming· way ... Superman and Dick Tracy? Why, certainly, they enter into the discussion, too . .. Who belongs? Why hono'-Students in .English ... Oh, definitely very stimulating, even to developing the members' literary abilities ... Very lucky to have Dr. Foster as faculty sponsor ... Why, no, we haven't as yet written the great American novel, but members contribute regularly to the Record

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The girls of Phi Upsilon Omicron have every right to be proud of this organization. First and foremost because it is the highest honor that can come to a girl in the Home Economics Department. Its members have shown intellectual industry, quali– ties of leadership and much personal charm. And secondly because it upholds 10 the utmost its task of being a creditable chapter in a notional honor group

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NEWMAN CLUB

The Newman Club points with pride to its record on campus. Ever since its humble beginnings, the club has lived up to its purpose of promot, ing the spiritual life of Cotholic students at the College. Father Dempsey acts as spiritual guide

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

A trad ition as old as the hills is Freshman Camp. As if sponsoring this weren't enough the YWCA also runs its annual carnival in the win– ter, c:lnd collects baskets of food for the needy at Thanksgiving . It would be difficult to forget the religious services daily conducted by the Y during the Lenten season

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The problems of student life were many andcamplex this past year. Who will ever forget ihe Cafeteria . incident? Certainly not. the Stu– dent Council who saw it through to an agreeable settlement. For this reason, and for their handling of class elections, and for their ·com– petent management of the Smoking Room, we remember Student Council 46

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Sometimes it's the or– gonizations you hear very little about which do the most. Basicolly, the Rural Club is interested in the community life of the rural areas of Western New York ond in the promo– tion of better under– stonding between urban and rural people. The club keeps up the ever– expanding Bureau of Instructional Ma– terials, and quietly

AKIBA

Have you heard of the recent addi– tion to State's family of organi– zations? Akiba is growing up. Speakers, parties and informal dis– cussions with special emphasis on the traditions of the Jewish faith, are aiding tbis development. During its flrst active year, Akiba has built a flrm foundotion for better understonding on the campus

RURAL CLUB

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The club with the highest professional ideals on our campus is certainly the Future Teachers of America. Because of the interest in the problems of war-time teaching several meetings were held at which guesi speakers discussed these issues. A discussion of particular inter– est was the one on the Four Great Educators. The local unit of the Future Teachers of America is affiliated with the national organization which is under the sponsorship of the National Education' Association. Dr. Harry J. Steel, Director of Training, is tke local faculty adviser

FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA

ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

" .. .. And how many pancakes do you think Black Sambo ate?" ACE' ers often ask the children to whom they tell stories this question. Work– ing with the children in nursery schools and settlement houses helps ACE keep abreast of recent devel– opments in Primary Education

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PSYCHOLOGY CLUB '

Interested in all branches of Psy– chology are the members of our own Psychology Club . Since admission to this group is limited to students who have attained a pre-semester overage of "8" in Psychology, the club is crammed with interested mem– bers. This year they mode several in– teresting visi ts to the Stote Hospital

ART EDUCATION CLUB

Of course you've all noticed . the changing exhibits in the Art Cel}– ter every week, and wondered . . . The faculty members certainly did not have the .time to put up new displays. These were the work of the Art Ed. Club, which again this yea r become a member of the East– ern Arts Association. The club has reorganized, and will operate under a new constitution next year

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Remember that week in mid-winter when cigarette smokers rambled the halls listlessly? ... the Smoking Room was closed. But when once again we were able to sing meaningfully Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, we found that "something new had been added to that famous cigarette" room-a mural done by the Art Kraft Klub. AKK did not stop with this their major project, but designed cartoon cards to be sent to our State men in service. Of course they have continued their routine duty of approving displays, using that ever-familiar signature which we sincerely echo, OK, AKK

One need never ask, "But can she cook?" of a Home Ec. Club member, for of course she can. But cooking is · . not the sole activity of this group, whose range goes much farther than that of · the kitchen variety. Last Fall they collected money for a scholarship fund which would en– able _stude",ts of . Home Economics from other countries to study in the United States. Shoes and men were not rationed at their glitter– ing dance, The Silver Slipper Hop

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB

AlHLEllC ASSOCIAliON

Romance and romance lan– guages,do they mix? A lock at the past history of Foreign Language Club says they do. Writers of many letters to French sal– diers in the United States, club members have formed many interesting acquaint– ances through the use of their adopted language. For a long time the For– eign Language Club has held supper meetings at which different languages are spoken and customs practiced. The interest of club members is riva lied only by their dynamic fac– ulty director, Dr. Messner 57

The smile of health ... this familiar advertisement might well have been written for the wo– men on this page. They are the members of the Athletic Association. This revamped organi– zation has made healthy strides forward in the past year. Through the efforts of these women a new constitution has been drawn up and put to a successful test. It is the job of the Athletic Association to supervise all after-hour sports on campus. And they have done their job well. A glance at the statistics showing the increased number of participants this year praves this point. No longer was it the same exercise-loving few who plowed their way over to the gym to play basketball, badminton and baseball. This plus better organization of all schedules predicts an invigorating future for the Athletic Association 56

SENIOR WOM N 'S GLEE CLUB

The literary department of this book would have to call in Samuel Goldwyn or some other Hollywood vocabulary genius to· pay full com– pliment to the Senior Women's Glee Club. It is an organization whose public appearances are all too rare. We see them in Assembly several times a year, and we thrill to their gorgeous tonal quality, and perfect harmoniz– ing ability. We demand encores of them at every appearance. But their experience has not been limited to Assembly appearances. They have really done a big job this past year. Their singing at C~ristmastime complimented the Dramatic Club's presentation, and set a perfect mood for the entire proceedings. Un– der the excellent musicianship of Mr. Boyd, the women rehearsed long and still longer for their part in the Lenten Services. The Senior Women's Glee Club's simple renditions of the

hymns of all faiths made the services more somber and reflectful in keeping with the spirit of the season. The reputation of our Senior Glee Club was definitely not confined to the College this year ... it became citywide. In the winter, they fulfilled a long ambition by making an appearance in Kleinhans Music Hall with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. That their performance was top-notch was evi – denced by the fact that the women won praise from the caustic music critic of one of the local papers. The girls with music in their hearts topped off their trilly season with a joyous hymn of Thanksgiving on V -E day and a reverent treatment of the responses to the prayers. It is the· love of these young women for music, as well as their continual attend – anCe at the weekly rehearsals which make their organization one of the most respected

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FRESHMEN WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB They're only Freshmen in the College, but you'd never dream it was so to hear them sing. Miss McMahon yearly picks out girls for her Glee Club who possess good voices and who show signs of dependability. This is important in the building of a Glee Club as re– hearsal attendance is directly proportional to polished performances. Miss McMahon can take a deep bow for her work, and so can her Freshmen who have sung so professionally

MEN'S GLEE CLUB The wa r has brought many changes to State as we all well know. One of these changes was the temporary loss of the ever-popular Men's Glee Club. But we have somehow survived the famine and have been rewarded this year with a new but earnest group of men interested in singing for the fun of it. That has been one characteristic above all others this year of the Men's Glee Club-they obviously enjoy sing– ing. Their enjoyment has spread across to the audience upon every appearance, and'has been apparent since their debut in the Fall. Much credit is to be given to the men for the forma– tion of this club, and for their perseverance in attending rehearsals, which were held at eight o'clock in the morning. The men have turned around that famous old saying, and in– stead are crooning for their morning meals

SEXTETTE

Everyone at College is familiar with our Sextette, composed of the six charming ladies you see on the opposite page. The girls have offered us many a charming program featuring the unusual ar– rangements which their unusual representation allows them to use. Not only do they sing well as a group, but each one of the girls has a voice of solo calibre in her own right. We like their music

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On stage ... Places ... Curtain. The House lights dim, and the magic of the theater becomes real when the audience sees a Casting Hall pro– duclion. The Nativity at Christ– mas-lime, the Spring Play and other presentations are the result of the combined work of Make-up, Prop– erties and Costume Committees, the Stage Crew ... AND the octors ..• in– tegrated effort which makes Cast– ing Hall productions distinctive 63

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PAN HELLEN IC SOCI ElY

It has long been a mystery to out– siders on this campus how the six sororities got along so well with each other, and showed such fine spi rit of cooperation. But, 10 the mystery has finally been solved. Pan Hellenic Society consisting of members from each of the six sororities on campus sets up rules for rushing·, and plans events which will further the good will between sororities. Our sororifies pictured on the next several pages prove thai they have done their job well

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Victory Vogues which was held wa y last fall proved again the origi– nali.ty and versatility of 'Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority. Because of wartime conditions it was not fea– sible to hold the Sweetheart Dance, a dessert bridge and fashion show being held in its place. Proceeds were sent to Base Hospital at Mit– chell Field . Alpha Sig has held the scholarship cup for two years

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ALPHA SIGMA TAU

That the Alpha Sigma Taus are a fun loving group is proven by what we see here on these pages . And they have a lot to sing about this year with their brand new house on Forest Ave– nue and the success– ful slumber parties they have had there. As always Alpha Sig has done' a thorough job of checking the names and addresses in the service file 68

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DELTA SIGMA EPSILON

That girl in gre·en whom you've seen: addressing Records for ser– vicemen, collecting handicraft ma– teria l for the convalescent men at O'Reilly's Hospital asking for more funds for the Red Cross .. . she's a Delta Sig. With their "Beer Gor– den" at the Y Carniva l, and their sincere devotion to the College, Delta Sigmas have won a place here

PI KAPPA SIGMA

When man bites dog that's news; when Pi Kappa acquires a new house that's also news! Cele– brating its fiftieth anniversary this year, Pi Kappa Sigma has a record of outstanding achieve– ment. Social activities and studies are al:ljusted so that the girls may devote several hours a month to rolling bandages for the Red Cross. And Pi Kaps candied apples served from "Ye Olde Apple Carte" are good news to all State students 73

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SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA

Tri-Sigma Sorority just doesn't do things half way. Raising money for the Cheer Fund is its special war– time interest, and they carry it through completely. But Tri-Sigs are known for other things too– fun-loving qualities, hospitality and generosity. Their Duck Dance made a good luck day out of Friday the thirteenth, and was as unforget– able as it was unusually different 74

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, Refresh- Servlnt~heNiagara mentsa usa the Square each third Thursk:~\heta month ma 'th Pular WI Sigs as po they servicemen as The on campus, aTe f Franken– house 0 tdone stein was?u b t Y CarnIval y a " Cham– Theta fS~o~rors, Its ber 0 0 y ICourtesy a annua, ditional Tea IS tra

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If perchance you wont to rhumbah Or sometime you need a plumbah Or you wont a girl who's dumbah. You can easily find her numbah ... in the Student Directory. This little black book, Cupid's helper, is the annual publication of Delta Kappa Fraternity which is again active on campus. With their donee, Kappa Ka pe rs, DKs once more brought bock to an eager College, their ma– ture, fun-filled joy of good living

PSI PHI

State seemed mare like itself this year than it has in a long time. The return to active duty of Psi Phi Fraternity was partly responsi– ble for this. And with this return came that well-remembered Psi Phi spirit. The reconditioning of the furniture in the Smoking Room was their quietly done task this year. The St. Valentine's Night Hockey Party, and the dance they gave jointly with Tri-Sig Sorority were su.ccesses in the Psi Phi W('y 80

Camaraderie, versatility ... these we attribute to Sigma Tau Gamma. The College remembers its successful skating party, and the participation of many Sig Taus in Basketball and Cross Country. Their White Rose Dance was, as always a highlight in the social calendar. A neat job of kem-ton– ing has brightened their chapter house, adding a goy background to their informal parties. Re– duced membership has tended to bring the brothers into a closer relationship, and to drive home to them the meaning of this word "fraternity"

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All night meetings ... cokes. sand– wiches and rubber cement . .. con– tinual huddles both between classes and during classes . . . the shortages created by war ... the deadline . . . all this is reminiscent of the 1945 ELMS. It has been a long pull and a hard pull. but that warm glow on publication day makes it all seem like a dream. A pleasant one

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THE RECORD

Truly a student newspaper was The Record this year. An outlet for student opinion on any and every issue that come up, our new and improved Record has a right to be very proud ' of itself. Guided by capable editors, its scope has in– creased to the point where it has become worthwhile to re-read it. We ofthe student body have looked forward to its publication, enjoyed its bright style, new features, and dynamic, forward-looking editorials

TH E HAN DBOOK

As the verdant fresh- might encounter, for man first enters the in it the principles corridors of State, and policies of the a thousaneil and one college are clearly questions immedi- stated. At a glance ately flash through the history, geogra– his mind. Before phy, traditions, and these queries ma- rules-even.the lan– terialize into actual guage of the up– words, a copy of perclassmen-can THE HANDBOOK is easily be under· given to him to scan stood. THE HAND· and later to study. BOOK tells when, This publication where and how solves many of the everything around problems that he the campus is done

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· I ds the way Angle ea

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ENS'B'lITY

Wait 'til next year

([SPO

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Dr. Silberman if you please

What the faculty didn't see

Swimming for fun AND credit

Count 'em

At last

Yum, yu~

HoUy holly hangs over thy head

Looks good from here

.,',

It had to be you

Y hello there

Quizzically speaking

f .-

Steinie CIt .he Sieinway

Alfred Holman, ir., director of publicity

TO OUR MEN IN SERVICE

IT IS HARD FOR US TO SAY WHAT WE FEEL IN OUR HEARTS ABOUT THE MEN WHO HAVE LEFT OUR COLLEGE TO FIGHT IN THIS WAR. SO MUCH HAS ALREADY BEEN SAID THAT ANYTHING WE MIGHT ADD HERE WOULD ONLY TEND TO MINIMIZE THE SACRIFICES OUR MEN HAVE MADE. WE CAN ONLY EXPRESS OUR HUMBLE THANKS. WE SHALL CONTINUE TO PLAY OUR SMALL PART, AND TO LOOK FORWARD TO THE DAY WHEN YOU WILL ONCE AGAIN WALK IN THE SHADE OF OUR ELMS

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CONCETTA SANElLI B.S. 10 Education

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ACCELERATED

SENIORS

ONE OF THE MOST UNIQUE CLASSES EVER TO GRADUATE FROM OUR COlLEGE IS SHOWN ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES. WE HONOR THE ACCElERATED SENIORS OF AUGUST 1945. THESE WOMEN, REC– OGNIZING THE URGENT NEED FOR TEACHERS IN THESE DAYS OF WAR EM– ERGENCY, HAVE STEPPED UP THEIR PRO– GRAM, GIVEN UP THEIR SUMMERS TO PREPARATION FOR THEIR CHOSEN WORK. WE SALUTE OUR FIRST ACCELERATED CLASS

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1945 ELMS STAFF

. Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Art Editor

Thomas Liddle Martha Tiedemann Beatrice Palmerton

Staff Editors

• Photography Editor Literary Editor Typing Editor Assistant Art Editor

Joan Steinmiller Sandy Pevney Annette Brown Dorothy Burns

Ar t Staff

Mary Bertell Dorothy Drath

Florence Beckman Jeanne Dilger Florence Duncan Victoria Gonzalez Dolores Merg ler

Gloria Grossman Mar jo ry Helstrom Janet Whalley

Literary Staff

Ruth Christman Helga Sy Gerda Williams

Hortense Butts Nancy Dunn Phillip Twersky·

Photography Staff

Moura lyons

Marlyn June

Typing Staff

Dorothy Foley Martha Tiedemann

Ruth Benzinger Thomas Liddle

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