Bay Area Edition | February 2020

BAYAREA EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 7  FEB. 7MARCH 5, 2020

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Makingwaves In a boat-shaped building along the Houston Ship Channel in La Porte sits San Jacinto College’s new Maritime Technology and Training Center. San Jacinto College maritime program lling needs BY JAKE MAGEE themon an operating vessel for up to 60 days, said John Stauer, the college’s associate vice chancellor and superin- tendent of maritime.

SAN JACINTO COLLEGE’S

MARITIME TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTERHAS SIMULATORS FOR STUDENTS TOUNDERSTAND HOWTOOPERATE BOATS.

On the water outside, ships large and small move up and down the channel. Vessels carry liquid cargo such as oil and petrochemicals, and captains operate tugboats and towboats responsible for pushing barges loaded with dry and liq- uid cargo. Inside the center, students learn the skills required to operate such machin- ery and succeed in the maritime indus- try. They learn through classroom instruction, realistic boating simula- tions and hands-on internships that put

“From a strategic standpoint, it couldn’t be a better place,” he said of the center’s location. “It’s on the water. Our customers are out there.” Ocials said the center is needed. J. J. Plunkett, port agent for the Hous- ton Pilots, a group of master mari- ners responsible for navigating ships through the Houston Ship Channel, said the maritime industry is as important as the medical and energy industries to Houston’s economy. The maritime eld CONTINUED ON 24

COURTESY SAN JACINTO COLLEGE'S MARITIME TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER

Each day, up to 25 million gallons of water rush through League City’s 521 miles of water lines to reach the city’s more than 106,000 residents and many businesses. However, city ocials have known for several years that 25 million daily gallons is not enough for future growth, and so they began their quest to secure more. League City City Council in October signed an League City securesmore water for future growth BY JAKE MAGEE

agreement with the city of Houston to reserve an additional 20 million gallons of water per day at an annual cost of $530,000 to start, but the city’s work is far from over. To acquire the reserved water, the city needs to replace the infrastructure that transports it and expand the plant that treats it—projects that will take years and have costs that will lead to water rate hikes for residents. Additionally, ocials have to be sure they do not overrely on groundwater in the meantime because League City is in a subsidence area that has seen land sink several feet since the early 1900s due to over- pumping of groundwater, ocials said. “Water has become the new black gold, like we CONTINUED ON 26

44M GALLONS PER DAY

50 40 30 20 10 0

As League City grows, it needs more water for its incoming residents. Ocials in October signed a deal to secure an additional 20 million gallons per day. SOURCE: CITY OF LEAGUE CITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

communityimpact.com

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