Alexander Abramson February 2019

Alexander Abramson

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

PLLC

220 N. Rosalind Ave. Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 649-7777

AlexanderAbramson.com info@alexanderabramson.com

Inside This Issue

The Guide to Buying a Business PAGE 1 3 Ways to Improve Your Memory PAGE 2 Why Employees Are Quitting in Droves PAGE 2 Is Your Receptionist Chasing Away Clients? PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Valentine’s Day Cookie Cards PAGE 3 All About Chocolate PAGE 4

WHAT YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT CHOCOLATE Fun Facts to Wow Your Loved Ones This Valentine’s Day

German chocolate actually has nothing to do with the country of Germany, either. It used to be called “German’s chocolate,” named after its inventor, Sam German, an American who made sweet chocolate for baking. Adding sugar to the chocolate made it a go-to option for bakers around the world, and the base for German chocolate cake was born.

Chocolate is a treat savored by people all over the world. What we know as the sweet, creamy decadence that sustains Valentine’s Day actually has greater historical and cultural significance. Fermented chocolate drinks have been dated back to as early as 350 B.C. The Aztecs believed it was the beverage of wisdom, and the Mayans saw it as something to be worshipped. While the history of chocolate is as rich as its flavor, there are some common misconceptions about the treat.

For chocolate to be classified as Swiss, it has to be made in Switzerland, as chocolate- making is considered an art form in the country. Known for its “melt in your mouth” quality, Swiss chocolate uses condensed milk to add a velvety texture. Many chocolate makers outside of Switzerland will refer to their interpretations of Swiss chocolate as milk chocolate instead.

Dutch chocolate doesn’t necessarily refer to chocolate made in the Netherlands; the

name refers to a specific chocolate- making process that uses the cocoa press. Before Dutch chemist and chocolate-maker C.J. van Houten invented the machine in 1828,

chocolate was only used in beverages. Dutch chocolate is chocolate that has been modified with an alkalizing agent in order to produce a milder flavor, making it a fantastic option for use in baked goods, candy, and ice cream.

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