CellCheck Newsletter October 2019_ FINAL

October Edition 2019

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

CellCheck NEWSLETTER

www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

PROGRAMME NEWS | 03

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR | 06 CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH | 08 RESEARCH UPDATE | 09

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

Programme news

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to the October CellCheck newsletter. Earlier this year, new regulations concerning veterinary medicinal products were passed in Europe. All EU member states will be required to implement this new regulation by January 2022. One of the key areas of change will the use of antibiotic when drying off cows, as it will no longer be acceptable to use antibiotic in a preventative fashion. To learn more about this, I encourage you all to come along to one of our CellCheck on-farm events that are currently happening around the country. See below for details. With the right hygiene, management and support, many herds are successfully reducing their antibiotic use at drying off. However, we also know that this change in practice is not without risk. Having robust data from Irish herds is important in understanding, preparing for and managing such change. Our featured research article presents the findings from some of the most recent Irish research on selective dry cow strategies in Irish dairy herds, while our guest contributor this month outlines the ongoing and future Irish research in the area of reducing antibiotic use at drying off. For anyone considering a selective dry cow strategy this year (even just putting a toe in the water!), don’t forget that there is support available for herd owners (eligibility criteria apply). Applications are still being accepted (until the end of November) from herd owners for free Dry Cow Consults, delivered through the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health, funded by the Rural Development Programme and coordinated by Animal Health Ireland. For more information and online applications click here .

PAGE 3

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | October Edition 2019

CELLCHECK ON-FARM EVENTS Teagasc | Animal Health Ireland

Rule changes to antibiotic use on dairy farms are coming ARE YOU READY?

SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGY – THIS FARM’S EXPERIENCE

IRISH RESEARCH ON SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGIES

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS - HOW BEST TO DRY OFF COWS?

If you want to learn more about any of these topics, come along to one of the Animal Health Ireland/Teagasc CellCheck Open Days

ANTIBIOTICS – WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

APPLYING FOR A FREE ‘DRY COW CONSULT’

FOR INFORMATION: www.animalhealthireland.ie 071 96 71928

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27

CELLCHECK ON-FARM EVENTS Teagasc | Animal Health Ireland Rule changes to antibiotic use on dairy farms are coming ARE YOU READY?

ON FARM VENUE | START TIME: 11.00 AM Patrick & Noreen Cronin, Cahirkereen, Kilnamartyra, Macroom, Co Cork. Supported by Dairygold Peter Hughes & Paul Maguire, Carron, Tipperary, Co. Tipperary. Supported by Tipperary Co-op Thomas & Christine Curran, Churchquarter, Cappagh, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. Supported by Glanbia Ireland John O’Connor, Ballindrohid Farm, Currans, Farranfore, Co. Kerry. Supported by Kerry Agribusiness John & Jimmy Bourke, Rathcunikeen, Two-Mile-Borris, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. Supported by Centenary Thurles

DATES MON 07 OCT TUE 08 OCT WED 09 OCT THURS 10 OCT FRI 11OCT MON 14 OCT TUE 15 OCT WED 16 OCT THURS 17 OCT FRI 25 OCT FRI 01 NOV

EIRCODE

P12 XW98

E34 FH94

X35 R620

V93 EN22

E41 W253

Donal Buckley, Mountnorth, Ballyclough, Co. Cork. Supported by Dairygold Jonathan Nyhan, Reacarrigeen, Ballinascarthy, Co. Cork. Supported by Lisavaird/Carbery William Stack, Moyvane South, Listowel, Co Kerry. Supported by North Cork Creameries Salesian Agricultural College, Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick. Supported by Kerry Agribusiness

P51 FX52

P85 Y516

V31 TD60

V94 X991

Martin Davin, Eglish, Rathdowney, Co. Laois. Supported by Glanbia Ireland

R32 YE00

Kevin Muldoon &Mella Briscoe, Cloncela, Ballycrissane, Portumna, Co. Galway. Supported by Arrabawn

H53 CP21

This series of CellCheck events is being run with the help and support of the local Co-op in each region.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Update on Mastitis Research at Teagasc

Pablo Silva Bolona, Research Officer, Teagasc, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork

R esistance to antimicrobials is an issueof increasing concernworldwide and it has been reported that up to 700,000 people die each year due to drug resistant diseases (United Nations, 2019). Indiscriminate use of antimicrobials, both in human and animal health practice has been identified as a risk factor for antimicrobial resistance. To that end, the EU has recently approved legislation to regulate the use of antimicrobials in animal production systems, which will prevent the use of these chemicals as a preventative measure. Dry cow antibiotic therapy has been used for the past 50 years as an effective measure, to eliminate persistent infections at the end of the lactation and to prevent new infections during the dry period. Additionally, dry cow therapy represents the largest use of antimicrobials on dairy farms. The EU directives will require a change in practice and management, where only cows with evidence of infection will be allowed to be treated with antimicrobials (selective dry cow therapy). Teagasc has been leading a programme of research targeted at reducing the use of antimicrobials on dairy farms. Over the period 2015 to 2017, a three year research project was carried out in three Teagasc herds, where cows with SCC < 200,000 cells/mL throughout lactation received either antibiotic and teat sealant or teat sealant alone at drying off. The subsequent SCC and infection levels were then monitored. The results showed that the group dried off with teat sealant alone had a higher SCC in the following lactation, however the difference was small (20,000 cells/ mL difference between both groups and both were below 100,000 cells/ mL). In autumn 2018, a similar research project was carried out in 5 commercial dairy herds. Data analysis and reporting will be complete shortly, but the preliminary findings show that all dairy farmers in this project managed to maintain a good bulk tank SCC throughout 2019.

Resistance to antimicrobials is an issue of increasing concern worldwide and it has been reported that up to 700,000 people die each year due to drug resistant diseases (United Nations, 2019). Indiscriminate use of antimicrobials, both in human and animal health practice has been identified as a risk factor for antimicrobial resistance.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | October Edition 2019

PAGE 6

UPDATE ON MASTITIS RESEARCH AT TEAGASC

This autumn, AHI in conjunction with Teagasc and the local dairy co-ops, are running a series of on-farm events promoting best practice in relation to selective drying off strategies. Teagasc has also been collaborating with Kerry Agribusiness to analyze data from farmers that have been gradually incorporating selective dry cow therapy into their farm practice. Initial results are positive and show that these farmers are maintaining a high standard of udder health in their herds. Additionally, Teagasc will continue to work on different selective dry cow therapies. One study will be looking at treating selected quarters of selected cows with antibiotic. For example, cows with one infected quarter at drying off will be either treated with antibiotics and teat seal in all four quarters, or antibiotic in the infected quarter only along with teat seal in all four quarters. The results of the two different strategies will be compared. This could result in a substantial reduction of the use of antimicrobials in dairy farms. Future research at Teagasc will also focus on the best criteria to identify both herds and cows that are best suited to selective dry cow therapy. Additionally, it will be important to establish the relationship between both herd and cow SCC and the level of infection. Finally an important area of research will be targeted at establishing which tests best identify cows suitable for selective dry cow therapy.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | October Edition 2019

PAGE 7

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

2020 lactation starts now!

[Click here] for previously published tips

W hile many farmers may consider the dry period as a time for winding down and a break (and rightly so!), it is also the time to get the next lactation off to a great start. What you do now when you dry off your herd can make or break 2020, in terms of udder health and mastitis control. The dry period is an opportunity to cure persistently infected cows. However, drying off and the dry period can also be a period of risk. While the teat canal is still open in the early dry period, bacteria can gain access to the quarter from the environment. Bacteria can also be inadvertently introduced when giving dry cow therapy. Hygiene and technique at drying off is crucial to avoid this-mistakes made now cannot be fixed later, and will have a negative impact on the udder health of your cows next year. Be prepared, be really fussy about your hygiene, don’t rush it and make sure you’re not hungry!

TIP

• • •

Mark cows before treating

Wear clean gloves

Disinfect teat ends well, starting with those furthest away Starting with the teats nearest you, gently infuse dry cow antibiotic, and massage into the quarter With teat sealant, pinch the base of the teat, and DON’T massage!

Disinfect teat ends with cotton wool or teat wipes

• •

Teat spray thoroughly afterwards

KEEP GOOD RECORDS!!

For more information and practical tips on Dry Cow Treatment, see CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control-Guidelines 16 – 18 & Management Notes C - F

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | October Edition 2019

PAGE 8

RESEARCH UPDATE

J. Dairy Sci. 102:4464–4475 | https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2018-15195 | © American Dairy Science Association®, 2019 .

Effect of using internal teat sealant with or without antibiotic therapy at dry-off on subsequent somatic cell count and milk production Sinead McParland, 1 * P. G. Dillon, 1 J. Flynn, 1 N. Ryan, 2 S. Arkins, 3 and A. Kennedy 2 1 Teagasc, Animal & Grassland Research and Innovation Center, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, P61 C996, Ireland 2 Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 WK12, Ireland 3 Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Limerick, Co. Limerick, V94 C61W, Ireland ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to assess the effect of treating cows with teat sealant only compared with antibiotic plus teat sealant at drying off on weekly somatic cell count, potential intramammary infection, and milk production across the entire subsequent lactation. In 3 research herds in the south of Ireland, cows with SCC that did not exceed 200,000 cells/mL in the previous lactation (LowSCC) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments at drying off: internal teat sealant alone (ITS) or antibiotic plus teat sealant (AB+ITS). Cows with SCC that exceeded 200,000 cells/mL in the previous lactation were treated with AB+ITS and included in the analyses as a separate group (HighSCC). Weekly individual animal composite SCC records were available for 654 cow lactations and were transformed to somatic cell scores (SCS) for the purpose of analysis. Data were divided into 3 data sets to represent records obtained (1) up to 35 DIM, (2) up to 120 DIM, and (3) across the lactation. Foremilk secretions were taken from all quarters at drying off, at calving, 2 wk after calving, and in mid-lactation and were cultured to detect the presence of bacteria. The LowSCC cows treated with ITS alone had higher daily milk yield (0.67 kg/d) across lactation compared with LowSCC cows treated with AB+ITS. The LowSCC cows treated with ITS alone had higher SCS in early, up to mid, and across lactation compared with LowSCC cows treated with AB+ITS. We detected no difference in weekly SCS of LowSCC cows treated with ITS alone and SCS of HighSCC cows. The least squares means back-transformed SCC across lactation of the LowSCC cows treated with ITS alone, LowSCC cows treated with AB+ITS, and HighSCC cows were 41,523, 34,001, and 38,939 cells/mL respectively. The odds of LowSCC cows treated with ITS alone having bacteria present in their foremilk across lactation was 2.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.91 to 3.85) and 1.6 (1.22to 2.03) times the odds of LowSCC cows treated with AB+ITS and of HighSCC cows treated with AB+ITS, respectively. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent pathogen isolated from the population. Recategorizing the threshold for LowSCC cows as ≤150,000 cells/mL or ≤100,000 cells/mL in the previous lactation had no effect on the results. The results indicate that herds with good mastitis control programs may use ITS alone at dry-off in cows with SCC <200,000 cells/mL across lactation with only a small effect on herd SCC.

KEY WORDS: teat sealant, dry-off, intramammary, infection, mastitis control

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | October Edition 2019

PAGE 9

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9

Made with FlippingBook - professional solution for displaying marketing and sales documents online