Franklin - Brentwood Edition - February 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 12  FEB. 24MARCH 22, 2020

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Steps to a better sewer system

The city of Brentwood has been working for the past several years to rehabilitate its sewer system and reduce overows.

2004 The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation issues a violation for a sewer leak into the Little Harpeth River.

2007 The city completes Phase I of its Corrective Action Plan.

2014 The city begins Phase III of the CAP. 2016 The city completes development of a Sewer Master Plan, including plans through build-out.

2019 The city submits a request for an extension to the CAP, giving it until 2022 to complete projects.

2020 The city is expected to close on land where it will build a storage facility. 2022 Construction is expected to be complete by the end of the year.

2008 Work on Phase II of the CAP is underway and sewer ow monitoring begins to identify issues.

2006 The TDEC issues an Agreed Order mandating rehabilitation work.

2000

2010

2020

Beneath the surface To date, the city has completed a number of rehabilitation projects across the area.

gallons 700M

Nearly

31+ 1/3

The city has achieved

of annual inltra- tion and inow removed

40%

miles

of city manholes relined or repaired

2000

2020

of pipes relined

INSIDE

16

capacity

SOURCES: CITY OF BRENTWOOD, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Investing inFranklin’s infrastructure Property taxes pave way for upcoming projects

What is Invest Franklin? The Invest Franklin initiative

Allows the city to engage in planning for capital improvement projects 10-year For city operations ($0.03) For Invest Franklin ($0.07) Funding capacity for projects has increased by over as a result of the initiative. $100 million

was made possible by a 10-cent increase in Franklin’s property tax rate in 2016. The initiative increases the funding capacity and the dedicated funding to infra- structure projects.

BY ALEX HOSEY

population is projected to grow by over 327,000, or by 149%, from 2018 to 2045, and the city of Franklin will be no exception to that change. “It’s the entire region that we’re see- ing this [growth],” Franklin Mayor Ken Moore said. “We’re looking at 14 coun- ties in the entire area, and we see all of CONTINUED ON 18

At January’s Breakfast with the May- ors, presented by nonprot organization Franklin Tomorrow, a recurring trend mentioned by the mayors from all over Williamson County was how to deal with growth in their respective cities. According to Williamson County Mayor Rogers Anderson, the county’s

Total property tax* $0.42

*PER $100 ASSESSED VALUE

SOURCE: CITY OF FRANKLINCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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