BHC Newsletter Spring FINAL

WHAT IS THE FARMER’S ROLE IN TACKLING AMR?

It is vital to keep these particular last resort antibiotics effective in human medicine, and so the animal health sector has a responsibility to ensure that this particular group of antibiotics are never used as first line treatment in animals. In Ireland, DAFM has published a policy document which outlines the conditions under which these last resort antibiotics should be used in veterinary medicine. We need to ensure that these antimicrobials remain effective for people and animals into the future. Your vet should only prescribe these antimicrobials when no other treatment will work as proven by the results of culture and sensitivity testing of samples taken from clinically affected animals. Responsible Use of Antimicrobials

Reducing the quantity of antibiotics being used in the both the human and animal health sector is key to addressing the challenge of AMR. Minimising disease on your farm means minimising the use of antibiotics as well as maximising productivity. When it comes to animal health, prevention is always better than cure in terms of maximising productivity with knock on benefits in terms of reducing antimicrobial usage and mitigating the risk of AMR development. Good biosecurity, vaccination, adequate housing, optimal stocking densities and parasite control are the cornerstones of disease prevention in animal husbandry. Antibiotics must not be used to compensate for poor farm management practices. What factors Increase the likelihood of AMR

developing? • Underdosing.

• Not finishing the treatment course. • Inappropriate use of antibiotics. • Using antibiotics of last resort (HP-CIAs) as first line therapy. • Incorrect Disposal. • Overuse of antibiotics.

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BEEF HEALTH CHECK NEWSLETTER SPRING EDITION

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