WE_Villiages_Kit_web

WE Villages Classroom Resource

Welcome

Table of Contents How to Use This Resource........................................................................................................................................................ 2 The Learning Process.................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Resource Rationale and Essential Questions..................................................................................................................4 WE Villages and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals............................................................... 5 Grades 1 to 3 Concept Lessons 1. Needs and Wants...............................................................................................................................................11 2. What Are My Rights?.......................................................................................................................................13 3. Who Is Responsible for Upholding My Rights?....................................................................................14 4. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child...........................................................16 5. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals......................................................................18 Exploring WE Villages................................................................................................................................................... 20 1. The World’s Wish List.......................................................................................................................................21 2. It Takes a Child....................................................................................................................................................22 3. The WE Villages Model...................................................................................................................................23 4. Making Connections.........................................................................................................................................25 Blackline Masters.............................................................................................................................................................26 Grades 4 to 6 Concept Lessons 1. Introduction to Human Rights and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.......................38 2. What Is Sustainable Development?......................................................................................................... 43 WE Villages Classroom Resource Inquiry Project........................................................................................... 46 Blackline Masters.............................................................................................................................................................51 Grades 7 to 8 Concept Lessons 1. Introduction to Human Rights and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.......................61 2. What Is Sustainable Development?......................................................................................................... 66 WE Villages Classroom Resource Inquiry Project........................................................................................... 69 Blackline Masters.............................................................................................................................................................74 Grades 9 to 12 Concept Lessons 1. Introduction to Human Rights and the UN Sustainable Development Goals...................... 90 2. What Is Sustainable Development?......................................................................................................... 96 WE Villages Classroom Resource Inquiry Project........................................................................................... 99 Blackline Masters..........................................................................................................................................................104 Appendices Appendix 1: Classroom Observation Forms.....................................................................................................119 Appendix 2: Resource List......................................................................................................................................... 122

WE Villages Classroom Resource 1

How to Use This Resource Defining Sustainable Development

Through sustainable development many of these causes can be challenged, lessened and eliminated. According to the United Nations (UN), Sustainable development has been defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainable development calls for concerted efforts towards building an inclusive, sustainable and resilient future for people and planet. For sustainable development to be achieved, it is crucial to harmonize three core elements: economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection. These elements are interconnected and all are crucial for the well-being of individuals and societies. Eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions is an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. To this end, there must be promotion of sustainable, inclusive and equitable economic growth, creating greater opportunities for all, reducing inequalities, raising basic standards of living, fostering equitable social development and inclusion, and promoting integrated and sustainable management of natural resources and ecosystems. Source: www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/development-agenda The WE Villages Classroom Resource is designed to introduce students to the concepts of human rights and sustainable development. From this learning, students will participate in an inquiry project to explore the WE Villages Pillars of Impact in more depth and understand the connections to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. To help students understand the complexities of sustainable development, this resource will begin by exploring basic human needs. Then, students will discover how basic needs are the foundation of human rights and will develop an understanding of who is responsible for upholding these human rights. This resource will introduce students to the UN Sustainable Development Goals that are designed to promote economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection, and ensure that human rights are upheld. The UN’s aim is to achieve these goals by 2030. Through the WE Villages Classroom Resource, students will recognize what role they play as global citizens and how they can take action to support sustainable development. Educator’s Notes throughout share tips and suggestions for differentiated instruction, as well as enrichment (i.e., going deeper) and extension (i.e., going broader). Blackline masters and observation forms are also included to use in your classroom. We have provided a selection of books, videos and posters as supplementary resources. Throughout you will see recommendations for assessing students’ learning. WE Schools follows the assessment guidelines outlined in the Ontario Ministry of Education’s Growing Success 2010 : • Assessment for learning is the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by learners and their teachers to decide where the learners are in their learning, where they need to go, and how best to get there. • Assessment as learning focuses on the explicit fostering of students’ capacity over time to be their own best assessors, but teachers need to start by presenting and modelling external, structured opportunities for students to assess themselves. • Assessment of learning is the assessment that becomes public and results in statements or symbols about how well students are learning. It often contributes to pivotal decisions that will affect students’ futures. Simply put, assessment for learning gauges students’ prior knowledge and understanding. Assessment as learning includes strategies that gauge understanding of the new concepts and skill development and, finally, assessment of learning gauge the extent to which students’ knowledge and skills are consolidating.

We provide recommendations and encourage you to work within the assessment and evaluation guidelines of your own school district.

2 WE Villages Classroom Resource

The Learning Process

Step 1:

Essential questions for exploration: ►► How do we meet the needs and rights of everyone around the world? ►► What makes development sustainable? ►► How is the WE Villages model contributing to sustainable change in the world?

Students begin by exploring two key concepts

Human Rights

Sustainable Development

Step 2:

Further the learning of key concepts with a student-led inquiry project.

Sustainable Development Goals

Education

Water

Health

Opportunity

Food

Step 3:

►► Take action through the WE Schools service-learning campaigns

Encourage students to apply and share their learning with others while taking action. Continue the action with:

►► Consider a future trip as a culminating experience for student learning ►► Trip opportunities include Arizona, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Kenya, Tanzania, India, China or Ethiopia (new for 2018)

WE Villages Classroom Resource 3

WE Villages Classroom Resource Our Learning Skills Legend Look for these icons from our WE Schools Learning Framework.

Reflection

Action Planning

Critical Thinking

Research and Writing

Argument Formation

Information Literacy

Leadership Skills Organization

Rationale Human rights are inherent rights believed to belong equally to everyone, but they are more than just abstract ideas. Human rights are the foundation for equality. Upholding them means ensuring everyone is free and safe, has access to health care, has enough food to eat and clean water to drink and has access to quality education. The WE Villages Classroom Resource is designed to help students understand human rights and explore how sustainable development facilitates upholding human rights for those whose rights may otherwise be denied. Working in sustainable development since 2004, WE Villages is the model WE Charity uses to partner with communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, Ecuador, Nicaragua, India, rural China and Haiti. Through WE Villages, partner communities are assessed for what they need to become sustainable; this may include education, clean water, health care, agriculture or alternative income projects; we call these our Pillars of Impact. These pillars are aligned with and support the UN Sustainable Development Goals, which were agreed upon by UN member states. Building on the many advancements made under the Millennium Development Goals, by the year 2030 the UN hopes to fulfill 17 new goals. Join us in helping the UN Sustainable Development Goals become a reality for the millions of people they affect. Together, we are stronger.

Essential Questions

►► How do we meet the needs and rights of everyone around the world?

►► What is considered sustainable development?

►► How is the WE Villages model contributing to sustainable change in the world?

4 WE Villages Classroom Resource

WE Villages and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals What Are the Sustainable Development Goals? The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a universal set of 17 goals and 169 targets that UN member states are expected to use to frame their agendas and policies by the end of 2030. Targets under goal one, for example, include reducing the number of people living in poverty by at least half by 2030 and eradicating extreme poverty (people living on less than $1.25 a day). Indicators are being developed to ensure quality, accessible, timely and reliable disaggregated data will be gathered to assist with the measurement of progress and to ensure that no one is left behind. Each indicator is assessed for feasibility, sustainability and relevance, with approximately two per each target. The new agenda explicitly states it is grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights treaties, the Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit Outcome. It is informed by other instruments such as the Declaration on the Right to Development.

They were officially adopted during the UN summit in New York in September 2015 and effective as of January 1, 2016.

The SDGs build and expand on the initially implemented eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which were agreed on by governments in 2001 and completed at the end of 2015. The MDGs provided a milestone blueprint for governments to develop agendas and policies designed to end poverty and improve the lives of people living in poverty.

The eight MDGs were:

1. To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

2. To achieve universal primary education

3. To promote gender equality and empower women;

4. To reduce child mortality

5. To improve maternal health

6. To combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases

7. To ensure environmental sustainability

8. To global partnerships for development

WE Villages Classroom Resource 5

What Was the Outcome of the Millennium Development Goals? The MDGs were consistently criticized for being too narrow, failing to consider the root causes of poverty and not fully grasping the holistic nature of development. Specifically, the MDGs made no mention of human rights and did not address economic development. And while the goals were intended to apply across the globe, they came to be seen as targets for poor countries to achieve, with financing from wealthy states. In contrast, the 17 SDGs are more expansive. All countries are called on to work toward their achievement. An emphasis has been placed on attaining gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls. A rights-based approach is consistently iterated, with a pledge to leave no one behind. The SDGs, therefore, represent a recommitment to the MDGs, providing an even greater scope and emphasizing the dignity of the human person as fundamental, and recognizing that a holistic approach is required in order to achieve sustainable development. What Are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals?

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere. 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization, and foster innovation. 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries. 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.

14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss. 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.

17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development.

Source: www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals

6 WE Villages Classroom Resource

HowWere the Goals Chosen? The SDGs are the result of two years of intensive public consultation and engagement with civil society and other stakeholders around the world—the largest consultation program in UN history—with special attention paid to the voices of the poorest and most vulnerable.

How does WE align with the Sustainable Development Goals?

dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and a requirement for sustainable development. In much the same way expressed in the agenda of the SDGs, WE recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and Identifying the need for a holistic development model, WE Charity launched WE Villages in 2004. WE Villages empowers communities with the skills, tools and training needed to break the cycle of poverty. The model is made up of the Pillars of Impact crucial to lifting communities from the cycle of poverty: (1) Education; (2) Water: Clean Water and Sanitation; (3) Health; (4) Food: Agriculture and Food Security; and (5) Opportunity: Income and Livelihood. Our programming supports community-led development in areas where there exists a high incidence of child labour, exploitation of children and minimal opportunities for girls. Specifically, each of WE Villages Pillars of Impact align with the following SDGs:

Education Corresponding SDG: 4) Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. Water Corresponding SDG: 6) Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. Health Corresponding SDG: 3) Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. Food Corresponding SDG: 2) End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Opportunity Corresponding SDG: 8) Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 7

How Does WE Villages Support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals? Ultimately, WE Villages Pillars of Impact help to support the outlined SDGs and beyond. When children are educated , they are armed with the courage and self-confidence to better themselves and their families, their communities, and the next generation. Improving access to clean water reduces illness, allows girls to go to school (girls are generally tasked with retrieving the family’s water) and leads to improved agriculture and access to food. Families who have access to health care can continue to be productive at home, at school, at work and throughout their communities. Innovative farming techniques and water management strategies help to ensure developing communities have access to healthy, self-sustaining food sources. Women who are provided with the training and support they need to increase their income-generating skills use this opportunity to provide for their children—sending them to school, accessing health care and ensuring they don’t have to go to work to help support the family. Moreover, WE Villages consistently employs a rights-based approach to program planning and implementation. This approach uses human rights as the basis for development initiatives and emphasizes that the project beneficiaries have entitlements/rights to basic necessities, such as basic education, primary health care and so on. In this way, the promotion, protection and fulfillment of fundamental human rights becomes the centre of concern for sustainable development. A rights-based approach helps to make development action more effective and more sustainable by emphasizing non-discrimination, attention to vulnerability and empowerment. All WE Villages programs are designed to empower communities to break the cycle of poverty and support themselves over the long term. By identifying and creating initiatives that address the needs of the community in a holistic way, sustainability is a focus from the outset of project planning. Sustainability plans are incorporated into all development plans and are informed by the needs and assets assessments that take place at the beginning of partnerships with the community.

Source: www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals

8 WE Villages Classroom Resource

Grades 1 to 3

WE Villages Classroom Resource Grades 1 to 3

Essential Questions

1. What is the difference between a need and a want?

2. How do we look after our needs and the needs of others around us? 3. How can we ensure that all of us are safe, healthy and happy?

Educator’s Note This resource has been created specifically for primary classrooms. Thought has been given to the developmental levels and learning needs of students ranging from six to nine years. Suggestions are provided to differentiate based on the learning needs within primary classrooms. The concepts of human rights and sustainable development are complex. In response, these lessons start with a simpler approach, introducing needs versus wants, basic human rights and who is ultimately responsible for protecting human rights. These concepts are complementary to common primary social studies thematic units of community roles and responsibilities of citizenship. For Example: The WE Villages Classroom Resource lesson package addresses the British Columbia Social Studies curriculum goals for students: • Develop an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the democratic system of government, including how decisions are made at the individual, group, local, provincial and national levels, and how students can get involved in the political process and express their opinions effectively. • Develop an understanding of how economic systems work and their place in an interconnected global economy, so they are aware of the interactions between political, environmental and economic decisions, and the trade-offs involved in balancing different interests.

The WE Villages Classroom Resource lesson package can help to address the curriculum goals for Social Studies, specifically through:

• Developing an understanding of responsible citizenship

Developing the personal attributes that foster curiosity and the skills that enable them to investigate developments, events and issues

The lesson package particularly supports the development of citizenship education and can help make connections to current issues and events. The following lessons will require access to a variety of books that are also listed in Appendix 2: Resource List . Please visit your Teacher-Librarian, local library or school district resource centre to get access to the books before beginning the lessons.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 9

Word Bank

Materials and Resources

Human Rights —Ensure that all people are treated with dignity and equality. We all have access to basic needs such as food, water and shelter. Need —Something that is necessary, a necessity. Basic needs such as food, water and shelter. Sustainable —Able to be continued for a long time at the same rate. Poverty —The state of being extremely poor, with limited to no access to basic human rights. Discrimination —The unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people, especially on the grounds of race, age or sex. Want —Something that is desired.

• Those Shoes, written by Maribeth Boelts, illustrated by Noah Z. Jones (Candlewick Press, 2007) • I Have the Right to Be a Child, written by Alain Serres, illustrated by Aurélia Fronty (Groundwood Books, 2012) • Beatrice’s Goat, written by Page McBrier (Aladdin, 2004) • It Takes a Child, written by Craig Kielburger (ME to WE Books, 2008)

• Appendix 1: Classroom Observation Forms

• Appendix 2: Resource List

• Blackline Master 1: Needs and Wants

• Blackline Master 2: Needs and Wants Game

Protect —Keep safe from harm or injury.

• Blackline Master 3: Who Looks After Us?

Educate —Give intellectual, moral and social instruction to someone, typically at school or university. Healthy —In a good physical or mental condition; in good health.

• Blackline Master 4: United Nations Model

• Blackline Master 5: My Rights

• Blackline Master 6: Beatrice’s Wish

• Blackline Master 7: My Wish for the World

• Blackline Master 8: WE Villages Model

• Blackline Master 9: Creating Connections

• Blackline Master 10: WE Villages Pillars, SDGs and CRC: How Do They Connect?

• Sticky notes

• Chart paper and markers

Source: www.en.oxforddictionaries.com

10 WE Villages Classroom Resource

Concept Lesson 1: Needs and Wants

Using Blackline Master 1: Needs and Wants , show students the list of wants and needs. As a class, categorize and place on the T-chart. Which of these is a need? Which of these is a want? Why is this item a need or want? Ensure that students provide a reason differentiating between a need and a want. As an alternative activity for students who understand the concept of needs and wants, use the four T-charts placed around the classroom. In small groups, have students create a list of their everyday needs and wants. Have students consider what they use every day from the time they wake up to the time they go to sleep. 5. Divide students into small groups. Explain to students that they are going to play a game. Present students with Blackline Master 2: Needs and Wants Game . Instructions: 4. a. Describe to students that they are on a small boat in the middle of the ocean, going toward a deserted island. They have 20 items on their boat. ( The 20 items are on the blackline master.) b. The boat is very heavy and is starting to sink. Ask students to remove five items from the boat to ensure that it does not sink. Remember to only throw away things that you will not need on the island. c. Oh, no! The boat has a hole. We need to make it lighter. Remove another five items. d. Seagulls are attacking the boat. Give them two items from the boat. e. You can see the island. But the boat is too heavy to push the rest of the way. Remove another three items. f. Well done, you reached the island! What five items are left in the boat? Students should be left with fruits/vegetables, water, tent, medicine and clothes. These represent the basic needs of food, water, shelter, medicine and clothing. For students who are not left with the five items that represent basic needs, ask why they selected those items over the others. Explain why food, water, shelter, medicine and clothing are important items to ensure they are safe and healthy on the deserted island. 6. Ask students, why did you choose these five items to keep? Why will you need these on the deserted island?

Suggested Time:

40 minutes

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Explore the difference between a need and a want

Educator’s Note: To help students understand the complex topic of children’s rights, it is important to begin by examining basic human needs and the difference between needs and wants. Once students understand this concept, they will be able to use this knowledge to build an understanding of children’s rights and why these rights must be upheld for all children. Before beginning the class, prepare four T-charts and place them on the wall of the classroom. 1. Recommended Assessment For Learning: Read the picture book Those Shoes , by Maribeth Boelts (2009) to introduce the concept of needs and wants. After reading the text, place a picture of a pair of fancy running shoes and a pair of plain running shoes on the front board. In pairs, ask students to discuss, what shoe do I need? Have students share their opinions with the class. What was the consensus? What shoes do you need and why? 2. Discuss with students what is a need? What is a want? Why did the boy in the story want the black high-top shoes with the two white stripes? Did the boy need the fancy shoes? 3. Recommended Assessment As Learning: Explain to students that each person requires certain things to be “safe and healthy;” these would be needs. However, there are some things that we may really want, but we do not need these to be safe and healthy; this is a want.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 11

7. Recommended Assessment Of Learning: Distribute an exit ticket to each student. Ask students to write down a need on one side and a want on the other side. As an alternative, have them complete the following sentence frame below the need and want: I need ________ because________; I want ________ because ________. Educator’s Note: After students have completed this lesson, they will have an understanding of the difference between needs and wants. The following lesson builds on the idea that a basic need is also a human right.

12 WE Villages Classroom Resource

Concept Lesson 2: What Are My Rights?

3. Read students the book I Have the Right to Be a Child, by Alain Serres (2012). After reading the book as a class, create a list of rights that were discussed in the book. Ask students, which of these rights are also our needs? Explain to students that each person in the world has the right to be safe, happy and educated. Having their needs met makes a person happy and educated. Educator’s Note: Be mindful that some students may be, or know someone who is, experiencing challenging circumstances where their basic needs are not being met. These students may not feel comfortable sharing this with their peers. Ensure that students feel safe in the classroom environment. 4. Recommended Assessment As Learning: On the front board, place a large map of the school with areas such as the classroom, playground, principal’s office, nurse’s office, water fountain, bathroom and cafeteria clearly labelled. Using the list of rights created in the previous activity, ask students to think about where these rights are being applied and supported in the school area. Have students consider, is this right one of my basic needs? (For example, the right to water is being fulfilled by the water fountain.) To extend the activity further, use maps of a home or of the larger community to apply the list of rights to see where these rights are supported. 5. Discuss with students, who is responsible for looking after our needs? Who makes sure we have everything so that we are safe, happy and educated? Have pictures or photographs of people in your school community and ask students, which of these individuals support your rights in school? To extend students further, ask students to identify who supports their rights at home, at school and in the community. 6. Ask students, why do we need to ensure that our rights are being met? What can happen if your rights are not met? Why do the people on the front board ensure that I am being taken care of? Why is that important? 7. Recommended Assessment Of Learning: On an exit ticket, have students complete the following sentence frame: At school I have the right to _____________.

Suggested Time:

40 minutes

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Understand that everyone needs things to make them safe, healthy and educated ►► Learn that they have the right to be safe, healthy and educated Educator’s Note: This lesson builds on the concept of needs and wants. As students have developed the understanding that each person has basic needs they require to be safe, healthy and educated, this lesson dives deeper into the concept of basic human needs being rights each person is entitled to. 1. Recommended Assessment For Learning: On the front board, show students one image at a time of different items that are needs or wants. As the image is presented, have students jump up if the item is a need or crouch down if the item is a want. 2. Using the think-pair-share strategy, ask students to create a list of five things that they need every day to ensure that they are safe, healthy and educated. After students have created their list, share these with the class. Encourage students to reflect back to the Needs and Wants game they played in Lesson 1 (what five things remained on the boat). Explain that food, water, shelter, clothing and medicine ensure that we remain safe, healthy and educated. Educator’s Note: Young primary students may require additional support and scaffolding to understand the concept of being safe, happy and healthy. Discuss these terms with students to ensure they understand how the fulfillment of basic needs leads to a person being safe, healthy and educated.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 13

Concept Lesson 3: Who Is Responsible for Upholding My Rights?

1. Recommended Assessment For Learning: On the front board, create four concentric circles, as shown on Blackline Master 3: Who Looks After Us? Label each circle, starting in the middle, At Home, In the Classroom, At School and In the Community . As a class, discuss and fill in each of the circles with information on who supports you in each area of life. For example: a. At home: parents/guardians grandparents, uncles and aunts, siblings b. In the classroom: teacher, parent helpers, teacher’s aide, other students c. At school: principal, teachers, other students, nurse, educational assistant, lunch helpers, cleaning staff 2. Describe to students that an organization called the United Nations (UN) has created a list of human rights called the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. They have also created a list of rights specifically for children, called the Convention on the Rights of the Child, or the CRC. We refer to these as children’s rights. Educator’s Note: If students do not have previous knowledge of the UN consider watching “How Does the United Nations Work?” www.youtube.com/ watch?v=QoIafzc0k74 (1:55) to briefly explore the history and function of the organization. 3. Recommended Assessment As Learning: Explain to students that the UN’s goal is that each person, in every country, is safe, healthy and educated, and that their rights are being met. On the front board, as a class, create a model of the school system and compare this to the UN. Use Blackline Master 4: United Nations Model as a starting point. a. Ask students, why do children come to school? What are they here to do? Draw students at the bottom of the front board. What are the rights of students at school? Explain to students that the students in the school are like the people of the world. b. Ask students, who is responsible for supporting students’ rights in the classroom? The teacher is responsible for ensuring that each student in d. In the community: neighbours, doctors and nurses, police, firemen, emergency helpers, government workers

Suggested Time:

45 minutes

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Explore how rights are supported

►► Discover who supports their rights (home, school, community) ►► Understand from a global perspective who supports their rights (introduction to the United Nations) Educator’s Note: Based on the previous lesson, students have developed an understanding of each person having the right to have their basic needs met, to ensure that they are safe, healthy and educated. This lesson builds on the concept of protecting and supporting these rights, and who is responsible, beginning within the home, school and community environment and progressing further into a global perspective. The following lessons will require access to a variety of books, which are also listed in Appendix 2: Resource List . Please visit your Teacher-Librarian, local library or school district resource centre to get access to the books before beginning the lessons. Be mindful, some students may be, or know someone who is, experiencing challenging circumstances where their basic needs are not being met. These students may not feel comfortable sharing this with their peers. Ensure that students feel safe in the classroom environment.

14 WE Villages Classroom Resource

their classroom is learning, safe and happy. Explain to students that the classroom is like a country of the world and the teacher is the person in charge of the country. c. Ask students, who is responsible for all the classrooms, students, teachers and a school community? Explain to students that it is the principal’s responsibility to make sure everyone in the school is safe, happy and educated at all times. The principal is like the head of the UN. To extend students’ understanding further, ask students, why is it important to have a Head of the UN? Is it the same reason a school has a principal? How are the roles similar? representation of how one of the rights below supports all people’s basic needs. Have students describe how the right is being met for them personally, and who is responsible for upholding the right. Students are able to draw, create a poster, a sculpture using modelling clay, a diorama or role play. After students have created their artistic representation, have students share their presentation with the class and describe how their right is supported and who is responsible for upholding this right. a. I have the right to water and food. b. I have the right to feel safe. c. I have the right to learn. d. I have the right to play and have fun. Provide students with an example as a prompt: I have the right to water. At home, if I am thirsty I can open a tap and water comes out. Have students describe, where does this water come from? Who provides this water? Who is responsible for ensuring that this water is safe to drink?

4. Recommended Assessment Of Learning: Ask students to individually draw or create a visual

WE Villages Classroom Resource 15

Concept Lesson 4: United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

(3:04). This video introduces the concept of children’s rights from the perspective of a child. As a class, create a list of the rights discussed in the video and write these on the front board. 2. Recommended Assessment For Learning: On three posters, place the labels Home, School, Community . Place the posters around the classroom before students enter the class. Divide the students into three groups. Have the students write or draw one right in each of these areas. For students who require additional support, do this activity as a class, on the front board. On each poster, students should have identified their rights. For example: Home —I have the right to feel safe; School —I have the right to learn; Community —I have the right to medicine when I feel sick. Have students begin by allocating the rights onto each list they created on the front board. 3. Explain to students, as they discussed in the previous lesson, the United Nations is responsible for ensuring that the rights of each child and person in the world are met. They have created a list of childrens’ rights that everyone must follow. These are called the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. There are 54 rights for children. These rights ensure that a child is safe, healthy and educated. 4. On the front board, write on the ccorresponding rights below each category. Explain to the students that there are many rights in the UN CRC that ensure that all children are safe, happy and healthy. These are the five we are going to focus on. All of these rights meet a child’s basic needs. Go through each of the rights below, discussing what they are and why they are important for all children. If students do not understand the terms “discrimination” or “protection” discuss these with students. a. The right to education. b. The right to safety and protection. c. The right to play and rest. d. The right to safe water and nutritious food. e. The right to not be discriminated against for any reason.

Suggested Time:

50 minutes

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Be introduced to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child ►► Understand that there is a specific agreement that protects children under the United Nations: the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child Educator’s Note: In Concept Lessons 1 and 2, students discovered the importance of having their basic needs met to be safe, happy and educated and how these needs are their rights. In Concept Lesson 3, students have begun to understand who is responsible for supporting these rights. This lesson builds on the idea of supporting and protecting these rights, and the documents that were created to ensure that children’s rights are protected. Understanding the UN CRC in its entirety is a large topic that may be challenging for your students to understand. Begin by focusing on the five articles below. To support student understanding of the rights, consider using videos and books from Appendix 2: Resource List to scaffold student understanding. a. The right to education. b. The right to safety and protection. c. The right to play and rest. d. The right to safe water and nutritious food. e. The right not to be discriminated against for any reason.

1. Show students the video “What are child rights?” www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1BFLitBkco&t=2s

16 WE Villages Classroom Resource

5. Recommended Assessment As Learning: Distribute one sticky note to students. Ask students to recall what their basic needs are. What do I need to be safe, healthy and educated? Write one need on the sticky note and post this on the white board, next to one of the rights from the UN CRC listed in the previous activity. Have students sign their note for collecting assessment data. 6. Recommended Assessment Of Learning: Distribute Blackline Master 5: My Rights to students. Individually, have students select one right from the UN CRC, listed in the previous activity. Have students write why this right is important for all children and what could happen if this right were not upheld. Extension: To extend the lesson, divide the class into five groups. Assign each group one right from the UN CRC, listed in the previous activity. Have students create a skit demonstrating why these rights are important for all children and the consequences of not having these rights protected.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 17

Concept Lesson 5: The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

1. Explain to students that when someone wants to achieve something they set a goal. Show students three personal goals that the teacher has set for the day. For example: Fitness Goal—walking 10,000 steps, Health Goal—drinking 2L of water, Work Goal—marking all the homework activities. Explain to students, if I (as the teacher) achieve these three activities, I have completed my goals for the day. Every day, each person completes certain activities they have thought about; these are their goals. 2. Recommended Assessment For Learning: In pairs, have students discuss a goal that they could set for themselves Have students complete an entry slip with the sentence frame “Today I will __________.” If students need more support, provide examples: Today I will complete all of my math homework; or, Today I will help three people. 3. Explain to students that the United Nations created a set of goals to help everyone in the world have the things they need to be happy and healthy. These goals are called Sustainable Development Goals. Explain to students these goals are like the world’s wish list. 4. Show students a poster of the Sustainable Development Goals sustainabledevelopment.un.org/ sdgs . Ask students, why do you think these goals were created? (To ensure no one is poor, to protect the planet and ensure everyone is happy and healthy.) 5. Show students the video “Malala Introducing the World’s Largest Lesson 2016,” vimeo.com/138852758 (5:16). Explain to students that there are many issues in the world. Many people’s needs are not being met so they do not feel happy or healthy. The Sustainable Development Goals are like a wish list. 6. Recommended Assessment As Learning: Write the five goals of No Poverty, Zero Hunger, Quality Education, Good Health and Well-being, and Clean Water and Sanitation on the front board. As a class, discuss each one of the goals and mind-map why they are important to be safe, healthy and educated. If students are unfamiliar with the vocabulary “poverty,” “quality” and “sanitation,” discuss these with students to provide additional understanding. Explain to students that the United Nations is responsible for supporting these goals.

Suggested Time:

2 x 50 minutes

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Learn that the United Nations has created goals to ensure each person is safe, healthy and educated

►► Explore how these goals are like the world’s wish list

Educator’s Note: Students have developed an understanding about human rights and the need to be safe, healthy and educated, and how these rights are supported and protected by the United Nations. This lesson extends their understanding further to discuss the Sustainable Development Goals. As this concept is complex, students will focus on the idea of the Sustainable Development Goals being the world’s wish list. Understanding the Sustainable Development Goals is a large topic and may be challenging for your students to understand. Begin by focusing on the five goals below: a. Goal 1: No Poverty b. Goal 2: Zero Hunger c. Goal 3: Quality Education d. Goal 4: Clean Water and Sanitation e. Goal 5: Good Health and Well-being

18 WE Villages Classroom Resource

7. Recommended Assessment Of Learning: Allocate each student one of the UN SDGs from the list below. Individually, have students create an artistic expression of the SDG, using either a sculpture (modelling clay), a diorama, artwork or a collage. In the artistic piece, ensure students are discussing what achieving the goal can mean for children around the world. In the artistic piece have students address the following areas: • What does the goal mean? (For example: What is zero hunger?) • Why is this goal a basic human right? • How does this goal make a person safe, happy and healthy? • Who is responsible for these goals? • What can you do to help support the goal? After students have completed the artistic piece, have them explain how their artwork describes the Sustainable Development Goal and why this goal is important to ensure each person is safe, healthy and educated. As an extension, students can see themselves as active citizens and think of ways they can help support the goal in their everyday life. As an alternative, students can explain this concept verbally to the teacher.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 19

Exploring WE Villages Grades 1 to 3 Essential Questions: 1. How do we support our needs and the needs of others around us? 2. How can we ensure that everyone is safe, healthy and educated? 3. How does the WE Villages holistic development model work toward a world where all people are safe, healthy and educated? Educator’s Note: This resource has been created specifically for primary classrooms. Thought has been given to developmental levels and learning needs of students ranging from six to nine years. Suggestions are provided to differentiate based on the learning needs within primary classrooms. This inquiry resource builds on student understanding developed in the WE Villages Classroom Resource Concept Lessons. Students have been introduced to the themes of needs versus wants, basic human rights and who is responsible for supporting these rights. Students began by exploring the UN CRC and developed an understanding about their rights as a child and how having their basic rights supported ensures that they are safe, healthy and educated. They continued this learning through an understanding that the Sustainable Development Goals focus on the rights of all people. This resource uses the analogy of wishes. The UN SDGs are complex for young minds. The goals are described as wishes for the world to support basic needs and rights and to work toward a world where all people are safe, healthy and educated.

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Create a wish for the world, focusing on people being safe, healthy and educated ►► Articulate how a wish for the world starts with them and can be a wish for all people ►► Be introduced to Craig Kielburger and the beginning of his life work in social justice

►► Learn about Craig’s wish for the world

►► Be introduced to the WE Villages model as the strategy to make Craig’s wish a reality (mission)

►► Explore how the WE Villages model developed

►► Explore how one Pillar of Impact ensures that all people are safe, healthy and educated ►► Investigate how each pillar supports the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

20 WE Villages Classroom Resource

Lesson 1: The World’s Wish List

2. Read the story Beatrice’s Goat, by Page McBrier (2004), to the class. Place the questions on the front board before reading. Ask students the following questions after reading: a. Was Beatrice safe, healthy and educated before the arrival of the goat? b. Which of Beatrice’s basic needs were not being met? 3. Recommended Assessment As Learning: After reading the story to the class, ask students to draw or write one wish they have for Beatrice, to ensure that she is safe, healthy and educated based on their understanding of rights using Blackline Master 6: Beatrice’s Wish . Have students describe why they created this wish for Beatrice. 4. Have students reflect back to Concept Lesson 1: Needs and Wants. Explain to students that many children in the world have a wish to be safe, healthy and educated. Their wish is to have their basic needs fulfilled. As a class, on the front board, create a list of the basic needs of all children. Ensure students focus on food, water, shelter, clothing, medicine and education. 5. Recommended Assessment Of Learning: Discuss and reflect with students about the importance of all peoples’ basic needs being supported to ensure that they are safe, healthy and educated. Using Blackline Master 7: My Wish for the World , have students write down one wish they have for the world and why this wish is important for all people. Explain to students that the aim of their wish is to ensure all people are safe, healthy and educated. Provide students with examples, such as: My wish for the world is for all children to have clean water. 6. On the front board, display a large stencil or an image of the world. After students have completed their wish for the world, place the stars around the world on the front board. Explain to students that these are their wishes for the world. These wishes will help ensure that all children are safe, healthy and educated. Educator’s Note: Leave “My Wish,” “Beatrice’s Wish” and “My Wish for the World” on the front board or around the classroom for the following lessons. Students will refer back to their wishes.

Suggested Time:

30 minutes

Learning Goals:

Students will:

►► Create a wish for the world, focusing on people being safe, healthy and educated ►► Articulate how a wish for the world starts with them and can be a wish for all people Educator’s Note: In the following lesson, students will engage with the large concept of SDGs by developing an understanding that the goals are wishes for the world, which support every person’s right to be safe, healthy and educated. Students will engage with these concepts through the story of Beatrice’s Goat, by Page McBrier (2004). The fictional character of Beatrice develops students’ understanding of a child who does not have their basic needs supported. The story allows students to understand a large concept through the eyes of character and personalize the concept for themselves. 1. Recommended Assessment For Learning: Distribute sticky notes to students as they enter the classroom. Have students imagine a genie has granted them one wish. Ask students to write or draw their wish on the sticky note. As students complete their wish, post them on the wall and create categories of similar wishes. Create a wish of your own and place it on the wall.

Educator’s Note: Students are likely to wish for tangible items, such as toys or holidays. The lesson will continue to build on their understanding of wishes and how their wish is different from the wishes of others.

WE Villages Classroom Resource 21

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140

Made with FlippingBook - professional solution for displaying marketing and sales documents online