City of New West Community Report 2018

2018 Annual Report

CITY OF NEW WESTMINSTER YEAR IN REVIEW

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Contents

04 MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR 8 POPULATION & DEMOGRAPHICS 36

05 MESSAGE FROM THE CAO 10 DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS 44

34 CITY GRANTS 06 MAYOR & COUNCIL 52 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC PLANNING

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MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR

MESSAGE FROM THE CAO

Mayor Jonathan X. Coté MESSAGE FROM

CAOLisa Spitale MESSAGE FROM

Looking back on 2018, I’m amazed at the progress we made on big projects that all at their

The main branch of our public library underwent major renovations throughout the whole of last year, including new reading and study spaces, installing energy efficient lighting, improving accessibility with installation of automatic doors and lower level washrooms, and making major infrastructure improvements throughout the facility. The project is now complete, with an official reopening celebration set for June 2019. Based on the success of the demonstration service and feedback from 2017, we launched a full scale, fully accessible pilot Q to Q ferry service in May of 2018. The daily service accommodated people of all ages and abilities, with over 60,000 passenger trips taken last year. Due to popular demand, the pilot was extended indefinitely and we hope to be able to provide this Queensborough to Quayside connection as long as we can. Thank you to everyone on our staff and in our community for all of your hard work this past year. Let’s make 2019 a great one too!

2018 was a year of progress, as we set the foundation for several important strategic priorities. City staff continued to provide excellent service to our

I’m also proud of the daily efforts of all of our staff to provide the necessary services that keep our city safe, keep our recreation programs running, and keep our city clean and maintained, just to name a few. Our fire department responded to 189 fires and over 2,500 medical emergencies, 30,000 participants enjoyed a wide range of our recreation programs, we issued a record high of 4,425 business licences, and we averted 1,733 tonnes of recycling and 3,632 tonnes of yard and food scraps from the landfill. We also saw 14,665 residents come out to vote in our municipal election last year. A huge thank you to all the volunteers, organizations, residents, and City staff who made 2018 a year we can be proud to look back on.

foundation aim to improve the lives of

people who live and work in our city. We continued to move forward on

community while working on projects that aimed to improve living, working, and visiting New Westminster. As New Westminster has grown and progressed over the years, we’ve also offered more services to meet the needs of our community. In order to facilitate workflow and centralize services, City Hall renovations started last year with the first phase still underway, which will include new meeting rooms and offices, as well as a seismic upgrade. Phase two will include moving Parks and Recreation administration to the refurbished offices on the main floor of City Hall. I believe investing in our arts community is important, as culture is a huge part of creating a livable city. We took our revised draft arts strategy to our community in 2018 through a number of means including an open house, workshop, and survey. We are currently working on a complete culture plan that will guide the cultural growth of our city into the future. We also implemented several actions as outlined in our Master Transportation Plan, which outlines policies and actions in support of creating a sustainable transportation system in our growing city. Some of our actions in 2018 include making further accessibility improvements such as installing curb letdowns and wheelchair landing pads at bus stops; working with community partner organizations to deliver the walking challenges, and completing neighbourhood transportation plans for Sapperton and Massey-Victory Heights. These actions work towards some of the plan’s overall objectives such as enhancing the pedestrian, cycling, and transit networks and promoting livable neighbourhoods.

affordable housing initiatives, engaged with our community on choosing a design option for the future aquatics and community centre, undertook a large library renovation project, and took the Q to Q ferry into the pilot phase following a successful demonstration period. I am so proud of what our staff, community members, and volunteers have achieved this past year and appreciate that our staff in every department continue to work tirelessly on our many projects and initiatives while providing excellent customer service every day. Our dedication to increase livability in our increasingly expensive region continues as we broke ground on two small sites affordable housing projects at 43 Hastings Street and 630 Ewen Avenue last spring. A modular supportive housing project at 838 Ewen Avenue was also approved last year with occupancy expected by the end of 2019. We also set the groundwork in 2018 for the recently implemented Rental Housing Revitalization Initiative, which protects tenants from evictions related to building renovations. Additionally, we are working on a Memorandum of Understanding with BC Housing to further our collaboration, including with our non-profit partners, in support of enhanced housing affordability. We also spent several months gathering public input and feedback on the proposed program and facilities for the future New West aquatics and community centre and pursued the development of two design options based on the feedback. To date, a schematic design phase has been completed by HCMA Architecture + Design and an advisory panel will be working to provide feedback to City staff as we move into the construction phase.

Lisa Spitale CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

Jonathan X. Coté MAYOR

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MAYOR & COUNCIL

MAYOR & COUNCIL

Mayor & Council

Mayor & Council

Electric Utility Commission

Police Board

Library Board

Chief Administrative Officer

Police Department

Electric Utility

Fire & Rescue Services

Office of the CAO

Library

Human Resources

Parks & Recreation

Development Services

Finance & IT

Engineering

2018-2022

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Councillor Mary Trentadue Councillor Nadine Nakagawa Councillor Chuck Puchmayr Mayor Jonathan X. Coté Councillor Chinu Das Councillor Jaimie McEvoy Councillor Patrick Johnstone

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POPULATION & DEMOGRAPHICS

POPULATION & DEMOGRAPHICS

Population: 2008–2018 BC STATS, POPULATION ESTIMATES

Population & Demographics

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

2008

2009 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Age-Sex Distribution 2018 BC STATS

70 +

65–69

55–64

45–54

35–44

25–34

15–24

0–14

8000 7000 6000

3000 4000 5000 2000 1000

1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 0 Female

Male

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Departmental Reviews

Contents

12 Legislative Services

13 Finance &

Information Technology

14 Development Services

16 Parks & Recreation

18 Police

20 Electric Utility

21 Human Resources

22 Office of the CAO

28 Engineering Services

30 Fire & Rescue Services

32 Library

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Legislative Services Legislative Services provides services to City Council, City departments and the public, and is responsible for ensuring city government and decision-making processes maintain transparency, accountability, integrity and accessibility. This includes providing support for council meetings, most committee meetings, public hearings, and bylaw creation. The department is also responsible for the City’s compliance with Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy legislation, and managing insurance and risk, corporate records, and elections.

Finance The Finance Department is responsible for the City of NewWestminster’s overall financial stewardship.

Accomplishments

Implemented new electric meter reading hardware/ software, transforming the way meter reading at the City is handled, resulting in increased productivity and efficiency Increased choice and convenience for city residents and businesses by offering more electronic payment options for both customers and vendors Upgraded the City’s financial system to ensure its compatibility with current technology

14,665 VOTER TURNOUT (28.9%) 9,820 COUNCIL MEETING VIEWS 199 UNIQUE VIEWS WERE THE MOST FOR A COUNCIL MEETING 92 BYLAWS ADOPTED BY COUNCIL 87 FREEDOM OF INFORMATION REQUESTS RECEIVED

Accomplishments

Looking Forward

Administered the 2018 General Local Elections to elect the mayor, six councillors and seven school trustees and implemented a new elector management system that facilitated the voting process Managed insurance and risk through the administration of the City’s insurance portfolio, minimizing loss exposure relating to liability by working with the City’s manager, legal services, City staff, and insurances providers Conducted recruitment of citizen volunteers, with City’s committees now having roughly a 50% gender balance

We will continue to support Council’s legislative agenda and work with Council on a review of the City’s committees.

Looking Forward

Going forward, we plan on upgrading the City’s electrical billing software and online customer portal to enhance our customers’ experience, while maintaining an accurate and efficient billing process. Throughout the year, we will continue to provide key support regarding budgets, procurement, project financing for all City departments.

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Development Services

Accomplishments

Looking Forward

Received final inspections on the city’s first laneway house

The Development Services Department’s workplan is quite robust for 2019 and beyond. We will continue to emphasize priority areas such as affordable housing, social equity, public engagement, and customer service performance targets. Tenant protections will remain a key focus of policy analysis, bylaw implementation, and process review. We will be introducing our Business Ambassador Program to Council and marketing the new program to the public. In the coming year, we are processing several large-scale redevelopment applications such as Sapperton Green; neighbourhood planning for the 22nd Street SkyTrain Station Frequent Transit Development Area; implementing the BC Energy Step Code; pursuing policy development around low-carbon infill development, heritage retention and rental housing initiatives; and commencing more robust reconciliation efforts in our development review processes.

The Development Services department proactively develops and facilitates planning, investment in the community, and regulatory strategies that are designed to make New Westminster a complete, balanced and livable community. We provide strategic community and social planning to foster a great place for living, working and leisure. This involves neighbourhood, urban environment, social and heritage planning, management of the development approvals and building permit and inspection processes, issuance of businesses licences and enforcement of bylaws.

Completed the City’s first Food Security Action Plan (2018)

Completed approvals on two City-owned small sites affordable housing projects and approved a BC Housing project offering temporary modular housing for women

5 HERITAGE REVITALIZATION AGREEMENTS ADOPTED BY COUNCIL 453 HOUSING UNITS STARTED 202 NEW RENTAL UNITS GRANTED OCCUPANCY 605 BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED FOR $292,105,214 IN TOTAL BUILDING PERMIT CONSTRUCTION VALUE

185 INQUIRIES FROM PROPERTY OWNERS,

4,425 BUSINESS LICENSES ISSUED (A RECORD HIGH)

REALTORS AND BUILDERS INTERESTED IN LANEWAY AND CARRIAGE HOUSES

148 NEW CHILDCARE SPACES CREATED

16,418 TOTAL BUILDING AND PLUMBING INSPECTIONS 248 TREE PERMITS APPROVED

840 COMPLAINTS RESPONDED TO, INVESTIGATED AND RESOLVED BY INTEGRATED SERVICES 200+ ATTENDEES AT THE NEWCOMERS INFORMATION FAIR AND FESTIVAL

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Parks & Recreation

Accomplishments

10,438 SWIMMING LESSON PARTICIPANTS AT CANADA GAMES POOL (A NEW RECORD) 694 YOUTH AND ADULT VOLUNTEERS SUPPORTED SPECIAL EVENTS PRODUCED BY THE CITY 2,500 CENTURY HOUSE ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS REACHING AN ALL-TIME HIGH 19,596 RENTAL BOOKINGS ACCOMODATED 3,374 PARTICIPANTS LEARNED HOW TO SKATE AT MOODY PARK ARENA

Services and Program Initiatives

Facilities

Commenced design for the replacement facility for the Queen’s Park Arenex

Our mission is to create parks and recreational opportunities that nurture healthy individuals and families, strong and unique neighbourhoods, a vibrant city, and thriving economy. Through our services, we strive to create quality of life for all in NewWestminster.

Implemented a new online registration and booking software for the management of programs, services, and spaces Through the Parks and Recreation Department, the City hosted a wide range of special events including the New West Grand Prix with over 4,000 visitors, 200 professional cyclists, 130 volunteers and $15,000 in prizes The “Meeting in the Middle’ program initiative featured youth and seniors working together on projects including the arts, technology, culinary arts, and community service

Completed design and began construction on the Queen's Park concession and washroom

Parks

Commenced preliminary planning and public consultation for the future westward expansion of Westminster Pier Park

Completed design and commenced construction on the new skate park in Queen’s Park

Looking Forward

In 2019, we’re looking forward to starting construction on the Queen’s Park Sportsplex, which will offer a variety of sports services which were displaced by the loss of the Queen's Park Arenex. In the spring, we will also open our first universal washroom in Queen's Park. Detailed design for the new aquatics and community centre will also be completed in late 2019 in anticipation of construction starting in 2020.

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

Proposed concept for the New Westminster Aquatics and Community Centre

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Police The NewWestminster Police Department provides a range of services including first-response, traffic enforcement, domestic violence response, forensic crime analysis, intelligence services, crime prevention, and victim services. Through the committed efforts of uniformed and civilian staff, along with volunteers and members of the Police Board, NewWestminster remains a vibrant and safe community.

22,569 TOTAL CALLS FOR SERVICE

25% REDUCTION IN ROBBERY RELATED SERVICE CALLS SINCE 2017

263 FALSE ALARMS

2017 (per 1000)

2018 (per 1000)

% change 18-17 (per 1000)

2017

2018 % change 18-17

Total Calls for Service

21857 22569

3%

291.2

295.4

1%

Criminal Code 1000-Persons (Violent) Offenses

600

576

-4%

8.0

7.5

-6%

2972 3448

16%

39.6

45.1

14%

2000-Property Crime

781

871

12%

10.4

11.4

10%

3000-Other Crime

4353 4895

12%

58.0

64.1

10%

Total Criminal Code

Accomplishments

1000-Persons (Violent) Offenses Homicide

1

0 -100%

0.0

0.0

-100%

Launched online Police Information Checks, allowing residents to get their employment or volunteer Police Information Checks without having to attend the police department

0

0

-

0.0

0.0

-

Murder-Attempted

34

22

-35%

0.5

0.3

-36%

Sexual Assault

210

222

6%

2.8

2.9

4%

Assault-Common/Trespass

36

27

-25%

0.5

0.4

-26%

Robbery

Partnered with community organizations to host events,

2000-Property Crime Break & Enter Business

178

193

8%

2.4

2.5

7%

including NWPD Youth Basketball Classic, Cooking with Cops, and Coffee with Cops, allowing us to meet face to face with residents to hear about their concerns and share crime prevention tips

81

110

36%

1.1

1.4

33%

Break & Enter Residence

57

102

79%

0.8

1.3

76%

Break & Enter Other

229

225

-2%

3.1

2.9

-3%

Motor Vehicle Theft

718 1036

44%

9.6

13.6

42%

Theft from Motor Vehicle

9

17

89%

0.1

0.2

86%

Theft-Other >$5000

453

481

6%

6.0

6.3

4%

Theft-Other <$5000

483

451

-7%

6.4

5.9

-8%

Mischief $5000 or Under

Looking Forward

356

386

8%

4.7

5.1

7%

Fraud Related

In 2019, we will expand our services to include online reporting and will introduce e-ticketing.

3000-Other Crime Breach/Bail Violation

162

134

-17%

2.2

1.8

-19%

120

118

-2%

1.6

1.5

-3%

Breach Probation-Adult

387

476

23%

5.2

6.2

21%

Cause a Disturbance

18

14

-22%

0.2

0.2

-24%

Counterfeiting Currency

15

23

53%

0.2

0.3

51%

Indecent Act/Exposure

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Electric Utility NewWestminster Electric Utility, in partnership with the community, strives to enhance quality of life, support sustainable development, and protect the environment. Supporting the City’s vision of being an innovative leader in the provision of service and a trusted partner with its customers, the utility maintains its commitment to being BC’s Best Electric Utility.

Human Resources The mission of the Human Resources Department is to support and enhance the activities and employees of the City and to maintain the integrity, quality of service, and the value of labour.

748 NEW ELECTRIC METRES INSTALLED 668 EXISTING METRES TESTED 162 TRAFFIC LIGHT PROBLEMS (INCREASED BY 231% FROM 2017) 55 RESPONSES TO UNPLANNED POWER OUTAGES AND 73 TO SCHEDULED POWER OUTAGES

168 JOB POSTINGS IN 2018 75%

Accomplishments

Accomplishments

Implemented a management skills development program designed to support managers and supervisors in effectively managing and leading their work teams Implemented a mental health and resiliency training program to support the mental health, well-being and productivity of employees Provided respectful workplace refresher training for staff to support a positive, diverse, productive and respectful workplace free from discrimination and harassment

Electrical Operations Completed the installation of new primary high voltage cable across the Queensborough bridge Prepared underground conduit and high voltage primary cable design from the NWR substation to Royal Columbian Hospital in order to connect their new energy centre Installed New Westminster’s first community urban solar garden at the Queensborough Community Centre Electrical Services Installed nine pedestrian signals and refurbished a number of traffic intersections

INCREASE IN JOB POSTINGS OVER THE PAST FIVE YEARS

Looking Forward

Looking Forward

Priority work in 2019 will be completing the installation of the two remaining high voltage cables going across Queensborough Bridge, as well as completing the installation of conduit and then pulling almost 9km of cable for the new RCH Energy Centre. Installation of a second urban solar garden is planned at the Engineering and Electrical Operations Yard.

The Human Resources Department will continue to provide high quality human resource services in support of the City’s strategic goals and business needs by ensuring that the organization is fully equipped for success. We will continue to build a high performing workforce and operating culture that is based on the values of diversity, collaboration, innovation and service excellence.

331 REPAIRED STREET LIGHTS (INCREASED BY 10% FROM 2017) 25 km

Created and updated a number of corporate policies to enhance organizational effectiveness

TOTAL FIBRE BUILD–OUT FOR BRIDGENET TO DATE

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Office of the CAO Administration Department Reviews The Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) oversees all City departments, the City’s corporate priorities, the Communications Division, the Economic Development Office, Anvil Centre Conference Centre, and Cultural Services.

Economic Development

Communications Division

Intelligent NewWest

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Completed the new Economic Development Plan

Oversaw the marketing and promotion of the of the new Parks and Recreation online registration system Provided communication and consultation support for the New Westminster Aquatics and Community Centre project

Updated Intelligent New West (INW) Strategic Plan approved by Council

Completed the updated Intelligent New West Strategic Plan

ICAC co-chair and former Councillor Bill Harper recognized by Public Sector Digest with an Open City Champion Award for leadership in open data and transparency for 2018

LOOKING FORWARD

With these two new plans the Economic Development Office will be implementing the policies, strategies and projects that diversify and strengthen New Westminster’s economic base for the long term while growing a positive business environment. By focusing on promoting New West’s competitive advantages and growth in the targeted business sectors of education, health-care, and tech and creative, the City can nurture a resilient and sustainable local economy.

LOOKING FORWARD

Implemented social media governance guidelines to city staff

The 2019 INW Operations Plan is focusing on initiatives that facilitate and support technology advances that will drive knowledge workforce growth in the city, for example collaborating more with existing partners such as New Westminster Schools in support of digital learning. There will be an enhanced focus on increasing digital intelligence and transparency with the City’s Open Data platform and continued expansion of e-government services.

LOOKING FORWARD

In 2019, the Communications Division will continue to explore and implement new tactics and educational tools to promote City initiatives and projects, such as video, digital advertising, and targeted campaigns. Communication and consultation support will be provided to the next phase of engagement for the New Westminster Aquatics and Community Centre project, as well as providing support for the New West City 101 youth engagement program.

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Office of the CAO Anvil Centre Conference & Theatre Services Anvil Centre’s fourth full year of operations continued to see significant increases in conference events, including conferences, meetings, gala events, consumer shows, AGMs, film shoots, theatre performances, dance performances, and other theatre activities. As the theatre performances continue to increase, Anvil Theatre is developing an audience base of return audience members. Anvil Centre Conferences has developed a client base of return events, many with multiple event dates.

Theatre Services

Conference Services

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

90+ performances took place in the Anvil Centre Theatre

Over 750 activities (performances, events, programs, conferences, exhibitions, tours, etc.) were booked in Anvil Centre in 2018

2018 was a year of forming new relationships, increasing public programming and audience development. Community partnered programs such as the Winter Celebration, showcased local performers and the Arts Club Series saw significant growth of the established audience base.

Anvil Centre overall generated over $2M in revenue

LOOKING FORWARD

Conference Services continues to develop their client base with the goal of continued growth of multi- day events and repeat clients.

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Office of the CAO Cultural Services Cultural Services aspires to enrich quality of life by providing and facilitating diverse cultural experiences through the arts, museums, art galleries, archives, heritage, and events. Culture plays a vital role in the social, economic, environmental, physical, and mental wellbeing of our city.

Museums, Archives &Heritage Services

NewMedia Gallery

Arts Services

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Curated and developed three in-house and nine off-site exhibitions through the support of 53 community groups and individual Delivery of 166 educational activities specifically designed to engage in the cultural heritage of our city, 6,771 attendees of all ages benefitted from these activities The New Westminster Museum and Archives will continue to grow upon its mandate to engage the community through stories and conversations that connect members of our city to on another. Specifically the NWMA will focus on leading conversations in support of New Westminster’s interest in reconciling its past relationships with indigenous communities. LOOKING FORWARD

Ran 126 registered programs in 2018 with 1,095 participants taking part

Worked with many local organizations and contributed to a variety of initiatives throughout 2018 including Capture Photography Festival, Children’s Fest, Canada Day celebrations, NewWest Culture Crawl, LitFest New West, and Family Day

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Four world-class exhibitions (Corpus, Trace, Gyre, Reclaim) featuring 17 multi-award-winning artists from 11 countries with a focus on superior visitor engagement for about 28,000 people. New Media Gallery STEAM Education with development of the Learning Lab, a state-of-the-art teaching space, benefitting almost 3,000 students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 and university students.

Hosted five Artists in Residence/ Solid Waste & Recycling Artists in Residence

Showcased 101 artists in the Community Art Space over the course of seven exhibitions

LOOKING FORWARD

Arts Services is looking forward to putting into action key elements of the newly completed arts strategy with support from the New West arts community and the City in the year ahead.

26,000 RECORD ATTENDANCE FOR THE LEGO EXHIBITION PEOPLE GOTTA MOVE 45,228 TOTAL MUSEUM ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Engineering Services

Accomplishments

Looking Forward

In 2019, we will work very closely with partner agencies to plan and design projects such as the Pattullo Bridge replacement, improvements to the Brunette Interchange, expansion of the Royal Columbia Hospital, and construction of the New Westminster Senior Secondary School. Significant capital projects include completion of the new Animal Services facility and a new Sportsplex in Queen’s Park. Work will also continue on our railway crossing program to improve safety and introduce whistle cessation at several locations including Quayside Drive, 20th Street, and Cumberland Street. We will also conclude a comprehensive Downtown Transportation Plan which will address pedestrian safety, livability and connectivity in the downtown and will complete final design for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway between Eighth and Fifth Streets. Traffic control at all elementary and middle schools will be reviewed in the city to ensure alignment with current best practices. In addition, a new ten year corporate energy and emissions plan will be prepared for Council’s consideration which will lead to energy saving improvements to City facilities and buildings, and transitioning of the City fleet to alternative fuel and electric vehicles.

Design and Construction Completed phase 3 of Ewen Avenue Streetscape Improvement Project

Transportation Delivered accessibility awareness training to more than 40 Engineering Department staff Delivered Transportation Forum as part of Innovation Week, focusing on new mobility and implications for local municipalities Installed new curb ramps along Sixth Avenue in Uptown to a more modern standard of design, to better serve people with vision loss or blindness Infrastructure Planning Completed energy and emission assessment of civic buildings Coordinated the servicing of developments including major projects such as Royal Columbian Hospital Phase 1, Pier West, Animal Shelter, NWSS, and various affordable housing projects

Engineering Services is responsible for planning, building, operating and maintaining the city’s essential infrastructure comprising of all roads, sidewalks, drainage and sewage collection systems, water distribution system, solid waste and recycling collection, and civic buildings. Engineering Services also provides animal control, parking management, environmental service and operates the City cemetery.

Completion of Braid Street Greenway Phase One

Pedestrian crossing improvements at seven intersections

Completed phase 2 of the Sapperton Sewer Separation Program

450 TRANSPORTATION ACTION REQUESTS INVESTIGATED AND RESPONDED TO

2,100 m OF REHABILITATED SEWER MAINS 40 RENEWED SEWER SERVICE CONNECTIONS 390 m OF CONSTRUCTED SEWER FORCE MAINS IN QUEENSBOROUGH 900 m OF INSTALLED WATER MAINS

578 STREET OCCUPANCY PERMITS ISSUED FOR WORKS OCCURRING ON CITY STREETS, SIDEWALKS, AND BOULEVARDS 6.8 km OF PAVED ROADWAYS 6,131 m 2 OF ASPHALT WAS USED TO REPAIR ROADS AND PATHS 1,432 m OF REPAIRED/ REHABILITATED SIDEWALK

RECYCLING & ORGANICS DIVERTED FROM THE LANDFILL IN 2018:

Engineering Operations 60 fleet vehicles converted to dual fuel propane contributing to a reduction of approximately 100 tonnes of GHG emissions The New Westminster Animal Shelter found new forever homes for 20 dogs, 111 cats and 18 small animals Curbside collection diverted 22% of recyclable material and 46% of organic material from the landfill

1,733 TONNES OF CURBSIDE RECYCLING 3,632 TONNES OF CURBSIDE YARD & FOOD SCRAPS 46% OF ORGANIC MATERIAL AND 22% OF RECYCLABLE MATERIAL

60 FLEET VEHICLES

CONVERTED TO DUAL FUEL PROPANE CONTRIBUTING TO A REDUCTION OF APPROX. 100 TONNES OF GHG EMISSIONS

Launched a pilot water consumption monitoring study for the single family sector

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Fire & Rescue Services

Responses

Accomplishments

Looking Forward

Along with Engineering Operations staff, members were deployed with the Mobile Command Unit to the Shovel Lake wildfire in summer 2018 Conducted a dangerous goods exercise with Southern Rail, CP, CN, Rail Association of Canada, NWPD, Delta Police Department, BC Ambulance Service, E-Comm 9-1-1 and Transport Canada, allowing participants to test current response concepts, plans and capabilities when responding to a rail line dangerous goods incident in New Westminster Members attended the Canadian Mental Health Association Resilient Minds training course aimed at building resiliency and providing education specifically designed for emergency first responders attending traumatic events City of New Westminster Emergency Management acquired satellite equipment to provide cellular, Wi-Fi, LTE, LAN/WAN service to be utilized during a wide area network failure ensuring we remain connected to emergency communications

In 2019, members will participate in a US/Canada Cross Border Dangerous Goods Rail Exercise to test inter-operable communications between US and Canada and tracking of personnel and resources and facilitating large scale evacuation orders. A number of members will also be furthering their education through the Fire Executive Management Program facilitated by BCIT. We will be adopting the Supra Lockbox Program, enabling emergency first responders to enter community buildings and large residential occupancies in a timely manner and with no damage being incurred. We will also be involved with developing a therapy dog program to support mental health resiliency for department members.

Alarm Activated/ No Fire

748

NewWestminster Fire and Rescue Services protects life, property and the environment through effective emergency management, fire and life safety education, fire code enforcement inspections, and by responding to emergencies. In addition to fire suppression, rescue service and emergency medical services, other roles include working with our community emergency service partners, developing the youth firefighter program and providing community outreach.

Explosion

1

Fire

189

Haz-Mat

52

Medical

2597

MVI

358

Public Hazard

44

Public Service

539

Response – Other

553

Specialized Transportation

1

Tech Rescue

3

Total

5085

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DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS

Library The NewWestminster Public Library supports lifelong learning and literacy through print and digital collections, information assistance, and a wide range of programs for adults, teens and children. The library is committed to ensuring that NewWestminster residents are connected to technology and digital information through free public internet stations, Wi-Fi, and an extensive collection of digital resources. In both our Uptown and Queensborough branches, the library provides a safe and welcoming space to read, study, plug-in, learn, and be part of the community.

STRATEGIC INITIATIVE

Upgrades

RenovationHighlights

DESCRIPTION Constructed in 1958 and expanded in 1978, the New Westminster Public Library plays an essential role in the community and has served generations of residents since opening its doors. As the community has grown and new services and offerings have been added, so too have the number of library users. An upgrade to essential infrastructure will extend the life of the building and is critical to ensuring library staff can continue to provide the excellent service the community has come to expect while enhancing the overall library experience and appeal. To address this need, planning, consultation, design and construction on an upgraded facility advanced in 2018. STATUS In January, we began a 16 month renovation project to the main branch of the library, with construction work being done while library continued to serve the community. The final phase of renovations will take five weeks with reopening expected on April 1, 2019.

Environmental

Public Services and Technology New reading lounge on the main floor

Replacement of original single-pane windows and skylights

Installation of energy efficient lighting throughout the building

New teen space near the children’s department

New technology lab on the second floor

Accessibility

Additional study space

Installation of automatic doors on all internal doors

Creation of a new meeting room on the second floor

Accessible washrooms on the lower level

Built-in audio visual equipment in all meeting rooms

Infrastructure

Upgrading the electrical transformer

Replacing ducting and ceilings

Asbestos removal

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

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CITY GRANTS

CITY GRANTS

2018 City Grants

City PartnershipGrants

Total Awarded: $481,218

1. Communities Embracing Restorative Action Society (CERA) 2. Family Services of New Westminster 3. Fraser River Discovery Centre 4. Massey Theatre 5. New West Hospice Society 6. New Westminster Chamber of Commerce 7. New Westminster Tourism and Convention Development Association 8. New Westminster Victim Assistance Association 1. Camp Kerry Society 2. Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame 3. Community Volunteer Connections Society - Fraser North 4. Hyack Festival Association 5. McLauren Centre for Multi-Cultural Ministries 6. New Westminster Amateur Radio Club 7. New West Family Place 8. New Westminster Firefighters Society 1. African Canadian Soccer and Cultural Association 2. Arts Council of New Westminster 3. Brazilian Community Association of BC 4. Centre of Integration for African Immigrants 5. Downtown New Westminster Business Improvement Association 6. Junior Enterprise 7. Khalsa Diwan Society New Westminster 8. New West Farmers Market Society 9. New West Hospice Society 10. New West Pride Society Community Grants Festival Grants

9. New Westminster Homelessness Coalition Society 10. Senior Services Society of BC 11. Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver 12. Arts Council of New West 13. Fraserside Community Services Society 14. Downtown New Westminster BIA 15. Royal City Musical Theatre Society 17. New Westminster Symphony Society 18. Royal City Humane Society 9. New Westminster Lawn Bowling Club 10. New Westminster Lions Club 11. New Westminster Youth Ambassador Society 12. Richard McBride Elementary School 13. School District No. 40 (New Westminster) 14. Spare Parts Adventure 15. Pacific Volunteer Education and Assistance Team for Animals Society 16. Wings Fellowship Ministries 11. New Westminster Hyack Festival Association 12. New Westminster Philippine Festival Society 13. New Westminster School District 14. Queensborough Special Programs Committee 15. Queensborough Special Programs Committee 16. Recovery Day BC Society 17. Sapperton Merchants Association 18. Uptown Business Association

Heritage Grants

Amateur Sports Grants

Total Awarded: $24,922

Total Awarded: $31,500

1. The Spirit of the Children

Society - National Aboriginal Day

1. Burnaby/New West Ringette 2. Hyack Swim Club 3. New Westminster Baseball Association 4. New Westminster Minor Hockey Association 5. New Westminster Minor Lacrosse Association 6. New Westminster Minor Softball Association 7. New Westminster Spartans Track and Field Club 8. Royal City Track and Field Society 9. Royal City Youth Soccer Club 10. Shasta Trampoline Booster Society Arts and Culture Grants 1. Douglas College Foundation 2. Federation of BC Writers 3. New West Film Society 4. New Westminster Community Choir 5. Queen's Park Healthcare Foundation 6. Queensborough Special Programs Committee 7. Schools Out Productions and New Westminster Secondary Musical Theatre Program 8. Story Money Impact Foundation 9. The Maple Leaf Singers 10. Royal City Literary Arts Society

2. The Ancient and Honourable Hyack Anvil Battery - Victoria Day Salute 3. New Westminster Heritage Foundation 4. The Royal Westminster Regiment Volunteer Band Environmental Grants 1. Burns Bog Conservation Society 2. New Westminster Environmental Partners 3. Queensborough Special Programs Committee 4. RSBC Rivershed Society of British Columbia 5. Voices of Nature Society Child Care Grants 1. Douglas College Early Childhood Centre 2. Glenbrooke Daycare Society 3. Golden Sunshine Daycare Society 4. Kolumbia Inn Daycare Society 5. Queen’s Avenue Daycare Society 6. St. Barnabas Daycare Society 7. Westminster Children's After School Society

Total Awarded: $48,286

Total Awarded: $20,000

Total Awarded: $30,000

Total Awarded: $248,100

Total Awarded: $32,386

11. Vancouver Tagore Society 12. Up Close Recital Society

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

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STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

2015–2018 Capital Project Initiative Status

Strategic Initiatives

COMMUNITY LIVABILITY & SOCIAL EQUITY ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERSHIP VIBRANT ECONOMY

ARTS AND CULTURE CATALYST PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Affordable Housing Projects Community Livability & Social Equity

Canada Games Pool and Centennial Community Centre Redevelopment Community Livability & Social Equity, Catalyst Project DESCRIPTION The Canada Games Pool and the Centennial Community Centre opened in 1973 and 1967, respectively. Many of the facilities’ building systems and components are approaching, or at, the end of their normal service life. The CCC/CGP redevelopment project envisions the replacement of the existing pool and community centre with a newly constructed integrated facility that provides opportunities for aquatics, health and fitness programs and services, and community recreation spaces to support the recreational and competitive aspiration of local residents, employees of local business, and visitors to the community. STATUS Public engagement to gather input and feedback on the proposed program or the future facilities that was identified through the feasibility study occurred January – April, 2018. Council has directed staff to pursue, in parallel, the development of two design options. The first is the community recreation facility developed initially through the community engagement process, and the second includes enhanced features to augment the competition hosting capabilities of the pool. The selection of the final preferred design option will be influenced by the availability of significant grant funding. The City is pursuing senior government grant funding from the Canada-BC Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program.

DESCRIPTION In January of 2015, the Mayor’s Task Force on Housing Affordability was established with the goal of increasing livability of the city by working with key partners to develop affordable housing projects that meet the needs of an identified group of people (e.g., families, seniors) with low to moderate incomes as a high priority. STATUS Two small sites affordable housing projects, 43 Hastings Street and 630 Ewen Avenue, have received all necessary approvals with subjects being removed related to lease and purchase and sale agreements. Ground breaking ceremonies for both projects were held in spring 2018. City staff reviewed four sites with potential for a possible modular housing project to address homelessness. Based on this review, Council directed staff to initiate a development approvals process for 838 Ewen Avenue. This process has been concluded, with the Public Hearing being held on June 26, 2018, and occupancy is expected by the end of 2019. Additionally, City staff, as directed by the Mayor’s Task Force on Housing Affordability, will review City-owned sites with potential for small-scale affordable housing projects. The City is also developing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with BC Housing, which will set out the proposed partnership between the two parties in the development of non-market and affordable housing sites to support the mandate of the Mayors Task Force on Housing Affordability.

The project continues to advance with the construction phase anticipated to commence early in 2020.

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

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STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

City Hall Upgrades Organizational Excellence

Commercial Recycling Environmental Leadership

Intelligent City Fibre Optic Network Community Livability & Social Equity, Vibrant Economy, Catalyst Project DESCRIPTION Affordable access to broadband connectivity is critical for facilitating local business growth, innovation and productivity. A key component of the City of New Westminster’s “Intelligent City” initiative is the development of an open access “dark” fibre network (i.e., a fibre optic that is available to multiple users) connecting commercial districts throughout the city and being made available to telecommunications companies and internet service providers (ISPs) for connecting multi-family residences, local businesses and institutions to high speed broadband service. In early 2015, Council approved a business plan that will see dark fibre connectivity to Uptown, Downtown, Sapperton, 12th Street and Queensborough business districts. STATUS Phases I and II of the Fibre Optic Network are complete, with 65% of Downtown’s phase 3 and 10% of the Uptown Network complete. Co-location facilities are also now completed. Currently, ten service providers have signed agreements with the City, with the latest being Zayo and Astute Internet. Twenty-nine buildings, as well as eight businesses, Douglas College, and the Justice Institute, are now all connected to the fibre network.

DESCRIPTION As the city has grown, so too have the services we offer to meet the needs of the community. Over the years, departments have had to re-locate in other buildings throughout the city, creating barriers to collaboration and work flow. To facilitate “one stop” service and ensure city services offered to the public continue to be performed in an efficient manner, necessary renovations are being made to City Hall. STATUS City Hall upgrades are currently in the construction phase. The first phase of the renovations will be focused on the basement level of the east side of the building. The upgrades include new offices for Human Resources, a new IT training room, a new meeting room for staff and public committee meetings, and a new south entrance. In the second phase, the former Human Resources space on the main floor west side will be refurbished and Parks and Recreation administration will move into the existing offices. A seismic upgrade will be undertaken for the basement level east side.

DESCRIPTION In order to achieve aggressive regional targets to divert 70% of the region’s waste from landfill, the City introduced several new organics and recycling initiatives. While the City has achieved great success in the residential sector, the Industrial, Commercial and Institutional (ICI) sector have largely relied on private waste collectors and the City’s Recycling Depot for access to recycling options. Metro Vancouver’s findings from a 2015 waste flow study identify the ICI sector as an area where improvement is necessary to meet regional waste diversion targets community while currently reviewing the equipment and staff resource requirements of the Solid Waste and Recycling Branch that would be needed to support expansion of the City's existing commercial recycling and organics collection services. The solid waste utility budget, which Council passed in 2018, approves the procurement of additional collection equipment and recruiting additional full-time staff, in order to support the growth and successful operation of the City's existing commercial recycling and organics collection services. STATUS Staff are continuing to liaise with the business

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

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STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION

STATUS Staff continued to implement the actions and policies as outlined in the Master Transportation Plan. Actions in 2018 included: • Advancing design and railway crossing requirements for the final phase of the Braid Street section of Brunette Fraser Regional Greenway • Partnering with Fraser Health, New West Schools, and Walkers Caucus to deliver Walk New West and the Walking Challenge • Continuing to install missing curb letdowns, wheelchair landing pads at bus stops, bus shelters, and sidewalk spot improvements throughout the city • Continuing to implement recommendations from the 2016 Intersection Safety Study • Completing a Queen’s Park Traffic Calming review • Completing the Sapperton and Massey-Victory Heights Transportation Plan • Advancing work on the Downtown Strategic Transportation Plan • Through development and rezoning applications, securing improvements for walking, transit, and cycling as part of the conditions for development

Community Livability & Social Equity, Vibrant Economy

DESCRIPTION The City’s Master Transportation Plan outlines policies and actions in support of sustainable transportation system. This initiative will develop an implementation strategy for advancing the plan’s objectives, including:

Enhancing the pedestrian network

Enhancing the cycling network

Enhancing the transit network

Promoting great streets

Managing roads

Managing goods management

Promoting livable neighbourhoods

2018 ANNUAL REPORT

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