Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC - September 2018

www.enkanter.com

September 2018

MOVING THE GOALPOSTS WHY LAWYERS AND FOOTBALL DYNASTIES NEED TO STAY ADAPTABLE

I feel very fortunate when football season rolls around. You see, I’ve had the privilege of calling three great NFL teams my “home” team over the course of my life, which affords me a good deal of flexibility when the season kicks off in earnest. Between the Eagles, Steelers, and Chargers, I’m almost guaranteed to still have a dog in the fight by the time the post-season rolls around. As someone who grew up in Philly but graduated from the University of Pittsburgh, I’m very grateful the Eagles and Steelers are in different conferences. I was especially appreciative of this during my college years, when the Steelers defense was absolutely impenetrable. This was the Chuck Noll era, when the likes of “Mean” Joe Greene, L.C. Greenwood, and Ernie Holmes perfected the Steel Curtain and carried the team to four Super Bowl victories in six years. Living in that time in that city, how could I not be a Pittsburgh fan? In the early and mid ’70s, defense was king in the NFL. Back in those days, the running game was far more dominant than it is today, and having a stalwart defensive line was often all it took to shut down an offense. But a series of major rule changes in the late ‘70s, which ranged frommaking field goals more difficult to stricter rules about contact with receivers, worked to make passing more viable and effective. In turn, this made the bulky, unresponsive defensive formations used by the Steelers obsolete.

Just as shifting rules and regulations have impacted the game of football over the years, similar changes have occurred in the legal world. While we often like to think of our justice system as being static, the truth is that many rules and procedures used by lawyers, particularly where trials are concerned, shift over the years. As a lawyer, adapting to these changes is critical to making sure clients’ cases don’t go the way of the Steel Curtain.

legal case as pregame training is to a football team. You need to have a game plan before you take the field, and part of that has to include finding jurors that will be receptive to your case. There are plenty of strategies lawyers on both sides of the courtroom use to find these jurors. It just comes down to transparency. The best defense you can have during any trial is a jury that finds you trustworthy. So my strategy boils down to just that: being worthy of trust. When I interview a juror, I want them to understand I’m no different than they are. I want to have a conversation with them, not rattle off prepared “gotcha” questions. Putting in the groundwork to find open-minded jurors, whether in criminal or civil cases, not only strengthens our defense for your case, it also gives us the opportunity to go on the attack. Much like football these days, a lawyer can’t afford to rely solely on defense. Being able to deflect the other side’s arguments while advocating your own points aggressively is what ultimately wins cases. Using this approach while remaining flexible to new strategies is what defines successful teams and effective lawyers.

JUST AS SHIFTING RULES AND REGULATIONS HAVE IMPACTED THE GAME OF FOOTBALL OVER THE YEARS, SIMILAR CHANGES HAVE OCCURRED IN THE LEGAL WORLD.

For example, when I first started practicing law over 30 years ago, the rules and prevalent strategies around the jury selection process were very different from where they are today. It used to be that both sides of the case had near- unlimited access to potential jurors, so lengthy interviews were conducted that dragged out the vetting stage of the trial for weeks. These days, the process is far more streamlined, meaning lawyers and prosecutors can’t afford to be as heavy-handed with their questioning.

-Elliott Kanter

Any quality lawyer will tell you that jury selection can make or break a trial. It’s as important to a

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC | (619) 231-1883

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FIND THE RIGHT FOOD BALANCE FOODS THAT CAUSE AND REDUCE INFLAMMATION

BLUEBERRIES: Many studies call blueberries one of the best fruits you can eat to ease symptoms of inflammation. These blue orbs of goodness are packed with antioxidants, vitamin C, polyphenols, and so much more. Eat a handful every day! SALMON: As a source of healthy fats and omega-3 fatty acids, salmon is one of the best protein choices for people with inflammatory conditions, or for those who want to keep inflammation at bay. BROCCOLI: One of the most nutritious and easily accessible vegetables around, the little green buds that cover the tops of broccoli are loaded with anti-inflammatory compounds.

The food you eat plays a major role in how your body functions on the cellular level. Some foods can wreak havoc on your body, while others can make you feel great. This is especially true when it comes to that all-too- common ailment, inflammation.

Refined carbs: Basically anything made from white flour falls into this category, including bread, pasta, baked goods, and cereals. Research suggests that refined carbs may be a bigger contributing factor than fat in obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. ALCOHOL: Too much alcohol puts a burden on your liver, an organ that helps flush toxins out of the body. You know all of those detox diets? They don’t work. In fact, the only way to detox is to let your liver do its job. When you consume alcohol, it’s harder for the liver to pump out the toxins in your body. When it can’t do its job properly, the result is inflammation.

Here are a few examples of foods that lead to inflammation:

SUGAR: One of the biggest culprits behind inflammation, sugar is far worse than eating fatty foods. It’s best to skip foods that have added sugar (and this includes sugar of any kind, including corn syrup, fructose, and sucrose). Many manufacturers now label food with more specific kinds of sugar to hide the fact that they added sugar to their product. Be sure to read labels carefully!

Now, for the good stuff. Eat these foods to reduce inflammation:

A FALL WITHOUT SPRAINS TIPS FOR SAFE PLAY THIS SEASON

Each fall, athletes of all ages will get back out onto their chosen track, court, or field. We’re big sports fans here at the Law Office of Elliott Kanter, and many of us will be getting outdoors too. While we can’t give you any better game advice than your coaches can, we can share some useful tips to help you prevent injuries during play. RESPECT THE RULES As a law firm, we feel like we have to lead with this important point. Much like the laws in our country, the rules and regulations of most sports aren’t just about ensuring fair play; they’re about keeping people safe. Clothesline tackles in football, for example, are illegal because of how dangerous they are. Making sure you follow all the rules and regulations of your chosen sport (including wearing all the right equipment) is about safety as much as it’s about good sportsmanship. ALWAYS, ALWAYS STRETCH BEFOREHAND The absolute best way to minimize the risk of a sports injury is to ensure your muscles and joints are limber before play. The kind of stretches that will most benefit you may change depending on the sport, but taking the time to do them should be a universal priority. Even if you’re

late to practice, the time spent getting warmed up is always preferable to sitting out the rest of the season thanks to tennis elbow or a torn rotator cuff. IF IT HURTS, STOP. IF IT KEEPS HURTING, GO TO A PROFESSIONAL From our experience representing folks in personal injury cases, we can say with confidence that it’s never a good idea to ignore pain. If you’re hurting during play, take a breather. If the pain persists, it could be a sign you have an injury or are close to sustaining one. It’s best to see a doctor or physical therapist and get their professional opinion. Our firm has helped many victims of car accidents and other injuries find the professional care they need. We’d be more than happy to share these resources with you regardless of the nature of your injury.

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC | www.enkanter.com

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DRIVE SAFE: KIDS ARE BACK ON THE ROAD

With the school year getting back into full swing, it’s never been more critical to stay alert and practice caution when driving. Between school buses, students on bikes, and kids on the street, there’s a lot of added congestion and a higher probability of an accident. Here are steps parents and drivers alike can take to help make the roads safer for everyone. IF YOU’RE A PARENT Teach your children road safety. It’s important your kids know the rules of the road so they can keep themselves and their friends safe. Emphasize the need to always use sidewalks and crosswalks, the importance of looking both ways before crossing the street, and the dangers of running into the road. Use caution when dropping kids off. To keep students safe, it’s important you follow your school’s drop-off procedure. These specific rules can most likely be found on your child’s school website, but it’s a good idea to keep a few general rules of thumb in mind. Don’t double park; it blocks sight lines for students and other drivers. Drop children off on the same side of the street as the school. And when possible, set up car pools with other parents to reduce the traffic in the school parking lot. IF YOU’RE A DRIVER Respect school buses. Unlike most vehicles, school buses carry with them extra sets of rules drivers need to be aware of. You should give school buses a wider berth than you do other cars to ensure you have enough reaction time if the bus stops suddenly or the rear door swings open. When a bus stops to drop off children and puts out its red stop sign, it is illegal to pass the bus, even if you are in another lane. Share the road. With young bicyclists and pedestrians taking to the streets, it’s important to respect their rights and ensure their safety. Be sure to not block crosswalks at a red light, as it forces pedestrians to walk in the street. Cyclists are expected to follow the same rules as drivers, but it’s best to drive defensively; a young cyclist may not have the awareness or good judgement to react to traffic patterns correctly. Be extra vigilant in school zones and recreational areas.

LATE-SUMMER PANZANELLA

Inspired by Food Network

Panzanella, a Tuscan favorite, is a salad that features hearty chunks of bread instead of leafy greens as its base. What could be better for a late-summer cookout?

INGREDIENTS

1 small loaf French bread, cut into 1-inch cubes (6 cups) 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

• • • • •

1/2 red onion, thinly sliced

1 cucumber, sliced into rounds

• • •

20 basil leaves, chopped

2 large tomatoes, cubed

Salt, to taste

2 red bell peppers, seeded and cubed

Vinaigrette

DIRECTIONS

1. Place a large sauté pan over medium-low heat and add olive oil. Add bread and 1 teaspoon salt and toss often for 10 minutes or until toasted. 2. In a large bowl, mix vegetables and herbs. Toss in bread and your favorite vinaigrette and mix again. 3. Serve immediately or let sit 30 minutes to allow the flavors to meld together.

Let’s do our part to make the road a safe place for everyone this fall!

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC | (619) 231-1883

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC 2445 Fifth Ave #350 San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 231-1883

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

WHY LAWYERS AND FOOTBALL DYNASTIES NEED TO STAY ADAPTABLE

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THE BEST AND WORST FOODS FOR INFLAMMATION

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3 TIPS TO AVOID SPORTS INJURIES

TIPS TO KEEP KIDS SAFE ON THE ROAD

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LATE-SUMMER PANZANELLA

INTERNATIONAL TALK LIKE A PIRATE DAY

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a broadside straight into your yardarm” (“But watch this”). They decided Talk Like a Pirate Day needed to become official,

England accent can be traced back to Robert Newton’s 1950 portrayal of Long John Silver in the movie “Treasure Island.” Historically, English-speaking

YO HO HO, LANDLUBBERS!

so they chose Sept. 19, which was Summers’ wife’s birthday (and the only date he could remember besides Christmas and the Super Bowl). In 2002, they pitched the idea to humor columnist Dave Barry, who promoted it in his syndicated column, and the concept quickly spread internationally.

pirates probably sounded more like Johnny Depp’s Captain Jack Sparrow. Unfortunately, the pirates of the Golden Age didn’t leave behind any YouTube videos to confirm this.

Ahoy, matey! Wednesday, Sept. 19, is International Talk Like a Pirate Day. Brush up on your pirate vocabulary, grab your eye patch, get your puffy shirt dry cleaned, and bring a little seafaring fun to your office or classroom. THE HISTORY OF THESE SWASHBUCKLING SHENANIGANS The holiday began as an inside joke between pals John Baur and Mark Summers in 1995. For reasons not even understood by themselves, they began speaking like pirates while playing racquetball, saying things to each other like, “That be a fine cannonade” (“Nice shot, dude”) and “Now watch as I fire CELEBRATE TALK LIKE A PIRATE DAY

LEARN THE LINGO, LANDLUBBER Participating in Talk

Like a Pirate Day is easy — you just need to know a few key phrases. “Ahoy, matey” means

“Hello, friend!” “Blimey, that son of a biscuit-eater hornswaggled me out of me doubloons” means “Darn it, that jerk cheated me out of my money!” “Shiver me timbers, that old salt is three sheets to the wind” means “Wow, that old sailor has had too much beer.” And if a pirate (or your boss) says, “Swab the deck, ye bilge rat, or it’s Davy Jones’ locker for ye!” start mopping the floor immediately.

DID PIRATES REALLY TALK LIKE THAT? The “pirate-speak” popularized in movies and Disney attractions probably sounds nothing like real pirates did in centuries past. Today’s swashbuckling phrases delivered in a strong Southwest

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC | www.enkanter.com

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