Todd Law Firm October 2019

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

Eminent Domain | Family Law | Personal Injury

3800 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 200 Austin, TX 78756

512-472-7799 Free Legal Guides at: DavidToddLaw.com

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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Why Basic Insurance Isn’t Enough

Weird History: The President and the Hollow Earth Grave Matters of the Law

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Leftover Candy Snack Mix Amazing Cat Tales

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3 Strategies for Helping Grandkids Pay for College

DON’T LET MONEY GET IN THE WAY Of Your Grandchild’s Education

Pay their tuition. Not everybody has $20,000 just lying around, but if you do, using it to pay for your grandchild’s tuition isn’t a bad way to spend it. Normally, annual financial gifts that are exempt from the federal gift tax can’t exceed $15,000, but payments toward someone’s tuition, for any

College expenses aren’t what they used to be. What used to be affordable to any student with a part-time summer job now can take years to pay off. If your grandkids want to go to college, the cost of education should not be a barrier to their future. Luckily there are ways that you can help ease that financial burden.

amount, are not taxed. Keep in mind, however, that the money can only go toward tuition, not toward other college expenses like room and board or textbooks. Help them find opportunities to save. Even if you don’t have thousands of dollars to give, you can still help your grandkids look for other opportunities to save. There are thousands of available scholarships, grants, and programs to help students pay for college, and helping them look online and in your community can go a long way. College could be your grandchild’s first stop on the path to achieving their dreams. You can be a part of that journey by making sure money doesn’t get in the way of that.

Invest in a 529 Plan. There are no limits on age, income, or monetary contributions attached to this college savings account, and contributions are tax-deductible in some states. Just like a Roth IRA, the earnings grow over time and can be used tax- free for qualifying expenses, like tuition and room . There are a few downsides, however. Funds from a grandparent’s 529 Savings Plan are considered student income and could hurt your student’s eligibility for financial aid. If you choose to fund through a parent’s 529 Plan, which doesn’t count as student income, you lose control over the funds you contribute.

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