Coppell - Valley Ranch - Las Colinas Edition - January 2020

COPPELL VALLEY RANCH LAS COLINAS EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4  JAN. 16FEB. 11, 2020

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8 newbusinesses and 4 coming soon near you

A look at the 2019 holiday season for Coppell postal center

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Community college district changes to helpwith enrollment, graduation

Unifying college The Dallas County Community College District is working to become the sole accredited institution over its seven colleges. This One College initiative aims to eliminate an issue of students being unable to graduate due to their coursework being spread across too many DCCCD colleges.

BY GAVIN PUGH

This issue has reached a tipping point as students have begun taking more online classes at multiple DCCCD colleges. A new initiative aims to eliminate that issue. The district is moving the accreditation of all seven colleges under one umbrella institution. This shift, dubbed One College, is expected to eliminate similar problems for grad- uating students while also removing enrollment barriers for prospective students. The One College initiative is expected to provide even more benets to local school districts. Coppell ISD, Irving ISD and Carroll- ton-Farmers Branch ISD partner with CONTINUED ON 14

Hundreds of Dallas County Commu- nity College District students learned too late they would be unable to grad- uate in spring 2019 despite fullling all of their course requirements. The source of the issue—a techni- cality—lies in a policy administered by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools that requires graduating students to receive at least 25% of their credit hours from a single institution. But the district has seven dier- ent colleges within its system, which resulted in a total of about 1,300 stu- dents in the 2018-19 school year being unable to graduate because their courses were too spread out among the district’s colleges.

DCCCD has 7 individually accredited colleges.

Students must receive at least 25% of their credits from one institution in order to graduate.

DCCCD is transitioning to 1 umbrella accredited institution to benet the district’s 108,000 students.

SOURCE: DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Once a cornerstone of the Valley Ranch community, the former Dallas Cowboys prac- tice grounds are being converted into a multi- generational housing development. The 36-acre project, Legends Crossing, is being spearheaded by development group Centurion American. At full build-out, the residential community will add 251 new units to Valley Ranch’s housing stock, ValleyRanchdevelopment withDallas Cowboys ties addsmore senior housing BY GAVIN PUGH

according to the developer. The Cowboys’ history in Valley Ranch spanned nearly three decades. The impres- sion left by the football team is evident in some of the street names: Avenue of Cham- pions, Touchdown Drive and Cowboys Park- way. That was before the team announced its move to Frisco in 2013. With the facility demolished, the devel- oper expects to begin issuing building per- mits for the rst homes in April. Amenities will include a trail system, a cen- tral community center complete with a work- out facility and a pool, and lawn care services provided for an area marketed toward the 55-and-older population.

Dirt is being turned at the former Dallas Cowboys practice facility to make way for a new housing development. (Gavin Pugh/Community Impact Newspaper)

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