Mann Law Firm - April 2020

www.MannInjuryLaw.com

478-742-3381

APRIL 2020

Workers’ Comp FAQs What Legal Questions Keep You up at Night?

People often ask, “What am I entitled to if I am hurt at work?” or “How much is my case worth?” Long story short, it all depends. Here’s what you need to know.

WHAT AM I ENTITLED TO IF I AM HURT AT WORK?

You can receive medical benefits and income benefits, also known as indemnity benefits. Your employer is required to provide medical treatment for your injury. However, there are several steps you must take, such as reporting the injury to your employer within 30 days. After the injury is reported, the employer is required to show you a copy of the list of doctors you can choose to see. The doctor you choose then determines your ability to work and whether you need a referral to a specialist. The doctor you choose is one of the most important choices made in a workers’ compensation case. This is why you should consult with Mann Law Firm before you make your decision. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY BENEFITS: These benefits are available if a physician determines you cannot work. You can receive up to two- thirds of the average weekly wage you earned at the time of the injury or illness. Unless your injury is “catastrophic” (for instance, you lost a limb or suffered a severe burn), you won’t receive benefits beyond 400 weeks from the date of your injury. TEMPORARY PARTIAL DISABILITY BENEFITS: These benefits are available if you can return to work but only at a job that involves lighter duties and less pay than what you earned before. You can receive up to two- thirds of the difference between your average weekly wage before and after the injury. These benefits stop 350 weeks after the date of your injury. “The doctor you choose is one of the most important choices made in a workers’ compensation case.” In addition to medical benefits, there are three types of income benefits.

PERMANENT PARTIAL DISABILITY (PPD) BENEFITS: Under Georgia workers’ compensation law, when an individual reaches maximum medical improvement (MMI) after a work-related injury, they’re entitled to permanent partial disability (PPD) benefits. PPD basically means you are eligible to receive compensation for the damage done to a particular body part.

WHAT IS MY CASE WORTH?

The value of a case depends on three things: the amount your employer will need to pay in lost wages, the amount required to be treated by a doctor, and how much your employer will pay in PPD. The first aspect is based on how much your employer will have to pay you in weekly workers’ comp checks. The second factor is how much the insurance company is willing to pay for a doctor to treat you, unless the employer’s company is self-insured. Then, it will depend on how much self-insurance your employer has on hand to make the physician payments. Third is how much the insurance company is going to have to pay in PPD. This comes into play after you’ve reached maximum medical improvement.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your case, never hesitate to contact us at 478-742-3381.

-David Mann

www.MannInjuryLaw.com | 1

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