LoRa Alliance® End of Year Report 2020

LoRa ALLIANCE ® 2020 END OF YEAR REPORT

Approved for distribution outside of the LoRa Alliance ®

INTRODUCTION | THE POWER OF LoRaWAN ®

3 6 7 8 9

2

KEY FACTS & FIGURES

LoRaWAN ® NETWORK COVERAGE

LoRa ALLIANCE ® CONTRIBUTION AWARDS

TECHNICAL UPDATES CERTIFICATION UPDATES REGULATORY UPDATES MARKETING UPDATES MEMBER ECOSYSTEM

11 13 15 43

VIDEO INDEX THE POWER OF LoRaWAN ®

5

14

SMART BUSINESSES USE LoRaWAN ®

INTRODUCTION | The Power of LoRaWAN ®

3

scale. Updates to the LoRaWAN Link Layer Specification v1.0.4 Package focused on ensuring that it would provide every element needed for easy development, certification testing, and deployment. The specification is now delivered as a complete package, and will further accelerate mass IoT and support our members and end-users as they roll out LoRaWAN solutions worldwide.

As I look back on 2020, the year was simply without prece- dent. It saw the greatest acceleration of digital transformation and automation in history. As the world looks to emerge from COVID-19, the reality that this will not be the last pandemic remains—and this means that every person, company and government must be better prepared to manage unpredictable and rapidly shifting landscapes. In 2020, our members truly delivered the Power of LoRaWAN ® to address a multitude of global challenges. I cannot state strongly enough how proud I am of the LoRa Alliance ® ecosys- tem and what our members achieved to make their communi- ties, businesses and the world at large safer and more produc- tive. Members quickly jumped to action to bring solutions to market as COVID-19 spread , showing how rapidly LoRaWAN can be deployed and bring value to meet the world’s challeng- es. Our members were also very active in the LoRaWAN for Good campaign, developing LoRaWAN solutions to support the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals. As 2020 was the LoRa Alliance’s 5th anniversary, I also want to extend my gratitude to all of our members who have invested significant time and energy to develop the LoRaWAN standard, certification program and market awareness. In particular, our founding members deserve recognition for all of their sweat and equity over the long haul to get us to this inflection point. Thanks to our members’ hard work, LoRaWAN is now rec- ognized as the market-leading, industry-standard technology for low-power wide-area networking. The LoRa Alliance and LoRaWAN standard have come a long way during our orga- nization’s first five years. The achievements of our members and improvements in the standard have laid the foundation for LoRaWAN deployments to truly explode in 2021. Regarding the LoRaWAN standard, one of our major goals as an alliance has been focused on taking steps to achieve zero-touch deployments, which are needed to enable mass

Donna Moore, CEO & Chairwoman of the LoRa Alliance ®

4

We also updated the Regional Parameters RP2-1.0.2 to include long range – frequency hopping spread spectrum (LR- FHSS) rates, which can increase network capacity significantly in certain scenarios compared to standard data rates, allowing greatly increased scale on the same network footprint. The new rates will also decrease management and deployment costs of networks, as fewer gateways are required. Finally, we introduced zero-touch LoRaWAN Device Identi- fication QR Codes for Automated Onboarding . The use of new QR codes for device provisioning simplifies and acceler- ates LoRaWAN network management by carrying all required identification information to add devices to a network. The simple fact is that zero-touch is critical to achieving massive IoT and it will continue to be a major focus for the LoRa Alliance next year. Our ecosystem has also been hard at work

other radio technologies are also beginning to proliferate in the market. And for those that are entering the IoT space and have learned how critical LoRaWAN can be to enabling their IoT use cases but aren’t sure where to get started, a wide variety of easy-to-use, off-the-shelf LoRaWAN starter kits are global- ly available in the market. Created by several of our member companies, these starter kits enable an individual or company to set up a LoRaWAN network and see data from their unique use case within hours – if not minutes! These types of mem- ber-driven solutions pave the way for greater LoRaWAN adop- tion globally. In short, we are ready for the future. Looking ahead to 2021, LoRaWAN will continue to drive new IoT use cases, focused on the health and safety of the public, environmental sustainability and business automation.

“WE have the power… Our power comes from our massive global ecosystem that collaborates to achieve both business and social goals.”

advancing infrastructure, products and solutions to make LoRaWAN more accessible than ever before. For example, we’ve seen significant activity enabling IoT use cases in remote areas

via the combination of LoRaWAN and satellite. We’ve seen strong member collaboration to support roaming, which is already available in countries around the globe. Members have implemented device-to-cloud infrastructure to make

“The opportunity is in our hands. And it’s up to all of us.”

“When we work together... incredible things happen.”

it easier than ever to get solutions up and running. Multi-RAN architectures that combine LoRaWAN and

VIDEO: The Power of LoRaWAN ®

5

KEY FACTS & FIGURES

6

NEW MEMBERS IN 2020: +74

2020 LoRaWAN ® CERTIFICATION TEST TOOL (LCTT) LICENSES: +131

LCTT

SPECIFICATIONS RELEASED IN 2020: • LoRaWAN Link Layer Specification v1.0.4 (TS1-1.0.4) • LoRaWAN Backend Interfaces (TS002-1.1.0) • LoRaWAN Regional Parameters (RP2-1.0.2) • LoRaWAN Device Identification QR Codes (TR5-1.0.0) • LoRaWAN Regional Parameters (RP2-1.0.1) • LoRaWAN DLMS End-device Monitoring Guidelines (TR6-1.0.0) • LoRaWAN Certification Protocol v1.0.0 (TS9-1.0.0)

2020 CERTIFIED PRODUCT GROWTH: +105

COUNTRY SUPPORT ADDED FOR: Cuba, Guinea, Indonesia, Mali, Montserrat, Philippines, Senegal, Syria, Vanuatu, and Viet Nam

2020 LoRaWAN ® NETWORK OPERATORS ADDED: +9

LoRaWAN ® NETWORK COVERAGE

7

LoRaWAN ® Networks

162

148

Countries with LoRaWAN deployments

LoRaWAN network operators

December 2020 All information contained herein is current at time of publishing – LoRa Alliance ® is not responsible for the accuracy of information presented

2020 LoRa ALLIANCE ® MEMBER CONTRIBUTION AWARDS

8

ANNOUNCED DURING THE ALL-MEMBERS WEBINAR NOVEMBER 16, 2020 In a year unlike any other and despite the challenges

companies and individuals strengthened the LoRaWAN ® standard and accelerated its adoption around the world. The annual award recognizes individuals and companies for their strong support and dedication to the LoRa Alliance over the past year.

compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic impacting companies and individuals around the globe, we have seen these mem- bers step forward and go above and beyond to support the LoRa Alliance’s work. Each of this year’s winning

The 2020 LoRa Alliance Contribution Award Winners are:

Lifetime Achievement Award • Dave Kjendal (Senet, Inc.)

Corporate Award • Charter Communications • SenRa

Leadership Award • Rémi Lorrain (Semtech Corporation) • Wael Guibene (Charter Communications) • Xiaobo Yu (Alibaba Group) Distinguished Service Award • Val Jelinic (Minol-ZENNER Group) • Ahmed Kasttet (Birdz) • Miguel Luis (Semtech Corporation) • Olivier Seller (Semtech Corporation) • Boris Stoeckermann (Minol-ZENNER Group) • Itziar de la Torre (IMST GmbH) • Lorenzo Vangelista (A2A Smart City S.p.A.)

TECHNICAL UPDATES

9

2020 was another very busy year for development of the LoRaWAN ® standard. Despite not being able to meet in person for most of the year, we were able to complete several work items, progress others, and onboard new ones. We have published the LoRaWAN Link-Layer Specification version 1.0.4 (TS1-1.0.4) . This version of the specification provides improvements to Class B and security, in addition to various clarifications and bug fixes. Publication of this specification was accompanied by the publication of a reference implementation, certification program and LoRaWAN Certification Test Tool (LCTT). Moving forward the future link-layer specifications will always be bundled with these other publications. The alliance also published the LoRaWAN Certification Protocol (TS9-1.0.0) to accompany the link-layer specification, whose implementation is required on the end- devices during the certification tests to facilitate the procedures. Two newer versions of the Regional Parameters Specification were published: RP2-1.0.1 and RP2-1.0.2. The two documents collectively introduced support for the following new countries: Indonesia, Viet Nam, Philippines, Cuba, Senegal, Montserrat, Mali, Guinea, Syria, and Vanuatu. Long Range-Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (LR-FHSS) data rates have been introduced to the EU868, US915 and AU915 regions. The new data rates will be instrumental in supporting satellite-based coverage, improving scalability of deep-indoor use cases, and help ease the dwell time limitations.

TECHNICAL UPDATES

10

A new version of the LoRaWAN Backend Interfaces Speci- fication was published (TS2-1.1.0). This version of the spec- ification supports LoRaWAN geolocation for roaming devices, and several enhancements to the accounting, JS lookup, NS identification, and message flow parts of the standard. In the spirit of reducing frictions and providing a zero-touch solution, the alliance has published a specification to standardize the QR code format for device identification to-be used during provisioning. TR5-1.0.0 is expected to be adopted by the device and solution makers around the world for using compatible QR code format on the device labels.

The alliance has also been collaborating with the DLMS UA on specifying how to use DLMS over LoRaWAN. LoRaWAN DLMS End-Device Monitoring Guidelines (TR6-1.0.0) has been published to provide a common list of management and monitoring parameters for DLMS use cases. Another smart metering-related activity has been our members engagement with the CEN for creation of a new WG (CEN/TC294/WG7), to tackle transportation of M-Bus payloads over LPWAN connec- tivity. LoRa Alliance ® members will participate in this activity to propose a specification for carrying M-Bus over LoRaWAN. The alliance has also completed development of second version of the FUOTA baseline specifications (multicast, frag- mentation, app-layer clock synchronization) and the very first versions of firmware management, and multi-package access specifications. Publication of these specifications are pending interoperability testing to be conducted among independent vendors. Another area of strong activity has been member collabora- tion to identity roaming spec improvements and help acceler- ate adoption. Multiple new successful interop events among network vendors are propelling new roaming agreements to be setup in the ecosystem. Finally, the LoRa Alliance is actively fostering collaboration between the academia and industry centered around the work we do to develop the LoRaWAN standard. We are very optimis- tic that this cooperation will catalyze many more work bringing strengths of both sides together.

CERTIFICATION UPDATES

11

The number of devices being certified is steadily increasing with more than twice as many devices certified in 2020 compared to 2019. The Certification Program was also significantly enhanced in 2020 with the creation of a single Certification Requirement Specification that covers all the regions. It includes both fixed (i.e. FCC regulations) and dynamic (i.e. ETSI regulations) channel plans for the different regions’ usage of license-free spectrum in the ISM band. This single Certification Requirement Specification also includes the additional tests from the public network operators’ device qualification program and the tests required for the certification of end devices against the LoRaWAN ® Layer 2 specification version 1.0.4. The regions covered by the End Device Certification program are EU863-870, US 902-928, AS923-1, AS923-2, AS923-3, KR920-923, IN865-867, AU915-928, and RU864-870. Another major focus for Certification has been the creation of a LoRaWAN Gateway Test and Measurement Guidelines document, scheduled for publication Q1 2021. This document defines what RF paraments to test and guidelines on how to measure them, this will allow all gateways to be measured in a consistent manner so the results can be compared. This work also includes the creation of an additional best practice document to provide information on how to deploy and use the gateways.

CERTIFICATION UPDATES

12

2020 LoRaWAN ® CERTIFICATION TEST TOOL (LCTT) LICENSES: +131

LCTT

The LoRaWAN ® Certification Test Tool (LCTT) for precertification testing of devices at the devel- oper’s site prior to full certification testing at a LoRa Alliance Authorized Test Houses (ATH) has proved to be very popular and has received very positive feedback from users of the tool. We now have more than 100 active users around the world. This tool is available free to all members and has recently been updated to support testing of LoRaWAN Layer 2 specification version 1.0.4.

ABOUT THE LCTT The LoRaWAN Certification Test Tool (LCTT) is available to all LoRa Alliance ® device manufacturers to pre-test their devices before sending them to the ATHs for LoRaWAN Certification testing. Benefits to LoRa Alliance members include: • An accelerated certification process • Time and money savings allowing

The LCTT is a pre-certification and regression testing tool for protocol testing against the LoRaWAN L2 Specification 1.0.2 and 1.0.4. Some of the features of the LCTT include: • Device manufactures can prove the device design before shipping it for formal certification testing • Pre-certification mode and a debug mode • Run on a local PC with a local

devices to debug and finalize design prior to starting the formal certification process

LoRaWAN gateway connected at a device manufacturer’s own facility

REGULATORY UPDATES

13

The prime objective of the Regulatory Working Group is to identify the key regulatory trends and public policy challenges to defend the LoRaWAN ® ecosystem’s interests and to ensure the business of the members of the Alliance can flourish with appropriate regulation.

On top of the noticeable releases of spectrum for LoRaWAN, the Regulatory Working Group also helped regulators in many countries to draft pieces of regulations for low power wide area networks (LPWANs) in unlicensed bands. We also provided pieces of information on national LoRaWAN deployments

worldwide, specified relevant parameters to be included in regulations, responded to consultations, and participated in a spectrum workshop with the International Telecommu- nications Union (ITU) / CITC (telecom regulator in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia). At the European level, the Regulatory Working Group became a partner of the Electronic Communications Committee (ECC) by signing a Letter of Understand- ing and participating in the ECC meetings including the ECC Plenary. The Regulatory Working Group promoted the LoRaWAN specification in Europe through work in ETSI and TG28 in particular. In 2020, the Regulatory Working Group not only improved the tools and the information on regulation that are made available to all LoRa Alliance members but also worked

with research companies and consultants to more efficiently monitor the spectrum bands needed for the definition of the new LoRaWAN Regional Profiles. In 2021, the Regulatory Working Group will continue to work on securing license-exempt bands for LoRaWAN everywhere in the world and will address new regulatory challenges related for example to certification or cybersecurity.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, most policymakers and regulators around the world were very much focused on public policies to fight the virus, so many discussions on other topics slowed down. However, the Regulatory Working Group achieved some very significant successes this year. One major success this year is the opening of license- exempt spectrum bands for the deployment of the commercial LoRaWAN ® networks in three key countries. In 2020, Morocco, Israel, and Italy are three very critical countries where the LoRa Alliance had fruitful discussions with national regulatory authori- ties leading to approval for LoRaWAN commercial deployments.

SMART BUSINESSES USE LoRaWAN ®

14

MARKETING UPDATES

15

2020 meant adapting to change, which resulted in bringing LoRaWAN ® marketing content to you digitally when in-person events were no longer possible. Expansion into digital marketing resulted in more online content from the

Even in the midst of a constantly shifting 2020, some things remained the same: the LoRa Alliance ecosystem continued to answer the call of our planet by enabling new, sustainable use cases and helping to fight Covid-19. In particular, member companies from around the world supported campaigns run by the LoRa Alliance: LoRaWAN for Good and Fighting Covid-19.

LoRa Alliance ® than ever before: • 17 webinars produced in 2020 • 7 white papers – with two more in the final stages of production • 130 use cases

• A complete revamp of the vertical markets area of the LoRa Alliance website. It now offers a much more interactive and content-rich area, showcasing the incredible achievements of LoRaWAN and the work of LoRa Alliance members in each vertical market • The introduction of a new, year-long webcast series called Destination LoRaWAN • The introduction of the Power of LoRaWAN video and theme • The introduction of the 5-Year Timeline Video – celebrating the LoRa Alliance accomplishments • New website focus areas: Fighting Covid-19, LoRaWAN for Good, Security and Private LoRaWAN Networks • The focus on Regional Marketing grew in 2020, including providing localized LoRaWAN content and translation of materials into multiple languages • Launched our Facebook page on November 25, 2020 gaining over 7K page likes as well as nearly 8K followers by the end of the year

As we close on 2020, we see the Power of LoRaWAN helping to meet some of the world’s biggest needs. We look forward to a 2021 that will see even greater adoption of LoRaWAN as digital transformation is accelerated to provide a safer, healthier and sustainable world. The LoRa Alliance is excited about the opportunities ahead! We have the power – the Power of LoRaWAN!

VERTICAL MARKET UPDATES

16

Throughout 2020, LoRa Alliance ® members supporting our vertical marketing activities have poured a large part of their efforts into content creation of all sorts. Events that would otherwise have been held in person, have quickly been turned into a series of webinars bringing together experts from around the globe and the LoRaWAN ® ecosystem to address a variety of topics. Addressing challenges around COVID-19 using LoRaWAN has been one of these topics. Additionally, our members created white papers and use cases that, together with the webinars, have been published on brand new vertical market pages on our website. These pages have become the main reference for any vertical content. We are proud of our content that promotes the great variety of interesting real-life applications around the globe and educates our end user market on the many advantages and solutions LoRaWAN has to offer. Let’s take a closer look at these new resources.

VERTICAL MARKET UPDATES

17

VERTICAL MARKET UPDATES

18

VERTICAL MARKET UPDATES

19

VERTICAL MARKET UPDATES

20

USE CASES More than 130 use cases are published across all pages in either a one page format or a detailed story.

WHITE PAPERS PUBLISHED IN 2020

21

AGRICULTURE How to make the right connection for precision agriculture READ NOW >

BUILDINGS Why LoRaWAN ® is the foundation for Smart Building success READ NOW >

HOW TO MAKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION FOR PRECISION AGRICULTURE

WHY LoRaWAN ® IS THE FOUNDATION FOR SMART BUILDING SUCCESS

MAY 2020

MAY 2020

INTRODUCTION The farming of tomorrow is already here: How LoRaWAN ® technology supports Smart Agriculture & Precise Animal Production READ NOW >

INTRODUCTION

sustainability and employee recruitment and retention programs and, with millennials who are used to automation and expect attractive work environments, the role of smart building applications will become of greater importance. For organizations to attract younger generations of workers, work locations, they will need to offer workspaces that attract them to come in and spend time there. Applications that enable the smooth sharing of desk space, enable individualized environmental and other controls and are maintained to a high standard of cleanliness and décor will be vital. Even so, buildings themselves remain unsmart. New buildings continue to be constructed with no reference to enablement of smart building applications forcing past, this had caused substantial challenges in terms of installing hardware, power supplies and connectivity ultimately making it both time and cost prohibitive. From a building owners’ perspective, being able to swiftly and cost effectively add new functionality to existing real estate and thereby increase its value is a key driver. The ability to add such capability at a low cost and with minimal disruption to

Water and nutrient levels, therefore, need to be managed for farms to be successful but traditional approaches of irrigation and fertilizing according to seasonal or crop- based cycles are imprecise, relying on season-wide averaging and insights gleaned retrospectively from crop yields. In contrast, a soil monitoring system can enable water consumption to be reduced by around 20%, according to real experiences from current deployments. Soil data is subject to variations in climate from year-to- year and to anomalies such as extreme weather or pest epidemics, so analyzing historical data doesn't provide all the benefits to farmers. More timely – and often real-time – information is required to enable farmers to react swiftly to changes in nutrient or moisture levels. Being able to irrigate when soil is too dry has obvious benefits in terms of yield size, but the same system can also advise that irrigation is not necessary when soil is at the right moisture level, thereby saving water. Similarly, it’s of no benefit to add nutrients to soil that already has reached the required level. However, to achieve this minimized usage of resources for maximized crop production requires far more granular detail than has previously been available. Data needs to be collected upon not on a farm-by-farm basis but on a field-by-field basis. Ideally, data collection should be even more granular, enabling insights into soil conditions in areas of fields in real-time so farmers can respond rapidly to clearly- presented data via mobile device applications.

The growing global population coupled with increased awareness of the demands agriculture places on the environment is putting farmers under intense pressure. They're required to maximize yields to feed more people while simultaneously ensuring their practices are sustainable. In addition, consumers demand cheap food, necessitating greater automation to preserve margins. There is a need to find a balance between intensive production and respect for nature and this cannot be achieved within the confines of traditional farming. Harnessing technology to enable smart agriculture has emerged to provide farmers with the tools they need to serve a 30% larger population in the future in a sustainable way that is in harmony with nature. Within smart agriculture, there are two main industries: crop production, which includes arable, orchard and vegetable farming, and animal husbandry. These have distinct requirements. This paper focuses on crop production exclusively. THE FARMING OF TOMORROW IS ALREADY HERE: HOW LoRaWAN ® TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTS SMART AGRICULTURE & PRECISE ANIMAL PRODUCTION To maximize production, resources need to be utilized effectively and, for many farms, this starts with ensuring soil quality is optimized and water is not wasted. Projections show that one-third of the world is set to be living in water stress and, with agriculture consuming up to 80% of the water in some countries while as much as 60% of water withdrawn for irrigation often does not reach the crop 1 , the situation must change urgently. NOVEMBER 2020

Smart buildings present an obvious sector of the market in which Internet of Things (IoT) enabled services can

applications to generate savings in utility consumption but this is now widening to encompass applications that support the new ways that people use the buildings they live and work in. Popular applications include room and desk sharing, individual environmental control, predictive maintenance and many others.

Costs associated with traditional workplaces have typically

JLL which outlines operating costs of US$3 for utilities, US$30 for rent and US$300 for employee compensation per square foot. Naturally, the actual cost of this varies from market-to-market but the ratio generally holds true. The employee compensation and that utility costs are the only area with room for maneuver. Historically, these are the easy wins with IoT-enabled sensors and meters being used to monitor and manage power, heat, cooling and lighting-

Low power devices with wireless connectivity therefore look particularly attractive for building tenants and owners but there is a bewildering and growing list of technological options that claim to offer this functionality for customers

However, organizations are now starting to realize that having a smart building means much more than making small adjustments to energy and water consumption. Smart building initiatives now form part of organizations’

LoRa Alliance ® and LoRaWAN ® are registered trademarks. Used with permission. ©2020 LoRa Alliance ®

www.lora-alliance.org

LoRa Alliance ® and LoRaWAN ® are registered trademarks. Used with permission. ©2020 LoRa Alliance ®

www.lora-alliance.org

INTRODUCTION

from farm to fork. With approximately 1.5 million cattle and nearly 978 million pigs being bred around the world (source: http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QA), these complex demands cannot be met without the help of new technologies, such as the Internet-of-Things (IoT).

Recent extreme incidents around the globe—famine, climate change, wildfires, tornados, droughts, floods, and pandemics—remind us that farmers are facing two major challenges: to feed the planet and sustain the environment. The balance between conducting intensive or extensive

Here are a few examples of the wide variety of use cases implemented today:

WHITE PAPERS PUBLISHED IN 2020

22

CITIES

LOGISTICS

Why LoRaWAN ® is the connectivity platform for smart city applications READ NOW >

Why LoRaWAN ® is the logical choice for as- set-tracking connectivity READ NOW >

WHY LoRaWAN ® IS THE LOGICAL CHOICE FOR ASSET-TRACKING CONNECTIVITY

WHY LoRaWAN ® IS THE CONNECTIVITY PLATFORM FOR SMART CITY APPLICATIONS

MAY 2020

APR I L 2020

UTILITIES A solution for successful interoperability with DLMS/COSEM and LoRaWAN ® READ NOW > INTRODUCTION We live in a rapidly urbanizing world, in which two-thirds of the populati n will live in citie by 2050, adding another 2.5 billion city-dwellers to the current just over 4 billion urban residents 1 . to them. For example, for turning a light off at dawn, there of devices, there are radio access networks to connect devices according to their needs and ensure connectivity is ubiquitously available at an appropriate cost. There are also data visualisation and analytics tools to derive actionable insights from the data that is collected and communicated.

INTRODUCTION

THE LOGISTICS SECTOR

Asset tracking has been among the earliest applications to gain significant traction first in the machine-to-machine (M2M) market over the last two decades and, in more recent years, in the Internet of Things (IoT). In early iterations, the connectivity used for asset tracking was either cellular or satellite. The objective was purely to have remote visibility of the location of the asset. However, with the evolution toward IoT and the increasing availability of new technologies—such as low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs)—asset-tracking applications are becoming more ubiquitous, pervasive and sophisticated. We are now able to communicate not only the position of the asset but also key information, such as the status of the object and data, such as temperature, speed and asset-specific information. This paper explores the importance of asset tracking within the evolution of logistics.

Supply chain and logistics are often used interchangeably, but this is not always accurate. Based on the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) definition, logistics is seen as “part of supply chain management that plans, implements, and controls the efficient, effective forward and reverse flow and storage of goods, services and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption in order to meet customers’ requirements.” Using the CSCMP definition, the logistics competitive landscape can be grouped based on different business models. Noting that companies can operate using different business models, they can be grouped in the way illustrated in Figure 1 .

Individual endpoints differ from vertical to vertical as

Smart cities are the ultimate in interconnected, intelligent infrastructure, with services, devices and systems linked that encompass simple inputs such as sensors on waste bins or controls for streetlighting to complex citizen services composed of multiple systems integrating with each other to enable smart transportation or connected vehicles. The connection of infrastructure and services in a city includes buildings, businesses and municipal assets, and operates alongside smart buildings, smart vehicles and smart utilities. The common goal is to make money, save money or achieve compliance. Often, it’s all three. As in all complex technological deployments, smart cities rely on an ecosystem of developers, equipment makers and service providers to provide the various pieces of the smart city architecture. This ecosystem looks very similar for all digitally transformed sectors, not just smart cities. The equation is composed of hardware, software, connectivity and data processing capability. There are sensors and actuators to measure variables and then react

LoRa Alliance ® & DLMS User Association Whitepaper

infrastructure of the network and the data handling is largely the same, providing a vast base of development and engineering resources. Thankfully, it’s not necessary to reinvent the wheel every time you look to connect a new endpoint device. The connectivity needs of an air conditioner are similar to those of a streetlight, although the data transmitted and the frequency of that transmission might be very different. requirements when it comes to infrastructure. They’re clearly different from a smart agriculture environment, for example, which has far fewer applications to support, fewer constraints in terms of dense urban topology, and involves fewer stakeholders to integrate across the ecosystem. Smart cities are complex in terms of the number of different services, applications and endpoints involved; they have challenging wireless network propagation characteristics, such as needs for in-building and underground network coverage; they involve multiple vendors and types of users;

Figure 1. Logistics Market Classification

Logistics Player Business Model

Logistics Player Type

Typical Customers

Segment

Mainly freight forwarders, third and fourth parties Trucking, rail freight, sea freight, air freight

Logistics Service Providers (LSPs)

Manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers

B2B

Carriers

LSPs

B2B

Retailers and manufacturers, other companies with the need to deliver items

Courier Express Parcel (CEP)

Last-mile delivery

B2B and B2C

Source: Elaboration on classification by PWC “Shifting Patterns: The Future of the Logistics Industry”

LoRa Alliance ® and LoRaWAN ® are registered trademarks. Used with permission. ©2020 LoRa Alliance ®

www.lora-alliance.org

LoRa Alliance ® and LoRaWAN ® are registered trademarks. Used with permission. ©2020 LoRa Alliance ®

www.lora-alliance.org

Whitepaper: A Solution for Successful Interoperability with DLMS/COSEM and LoRaWAN ®

WEBINARS CONDUCTED IN 2020

23

AGRICULTURE

Agricultura Inteligente en América Latina: LoRaWAN ® hace posible las granjas conectadas. VIEW NOW >

Soluciones LoRaWAN ® para agricultura inteligente y el campo conectado en América Latina VIEW NOW >

Smarter decisions and data for agriculture in Latin America powered by LoRaWAN ® VIEW NOW >

WEBINARS CONDUCTED IN 2020

24

BUILDINGS The Future of Commercial Real Estate & Large Facilities; New Perspectives after COVID-19 VIEW NOW >

CITIES

The future of LoRaWAN ® in India VIEW NOW >

INDUSTRY LoRaWAN ® , A Digital Revolution for Oil & Gas. Run twice in collaboration with two different platforms: ENTELEC Association and EnergyNow

LOGISTICS

Asset tracking solutions for COVID-19 (2 sessions to accommodate 2 time zones) VIEW NOW >

WEBINARS CONDUCTED IN 2020

25

UTILITIES The evolution of smart water metering in North America: Deploying LoRaWAN ® AMI with Neptune and Senet VIEW NOW >

LoRaWAN ® solutions for Smart Water Management VIEW NOW >

New applications of DLMS over LoRaWAN ® VIEW NOW >

How do M-Bus and LoRaWAN ® strengthen each other? A Close-up on Heat Metering VIEW NOW >



!"#"$%"

2020 INDUSTRY EVENTS

26

DISTRIBUTECH INTERNATIONAL January 28-30 (Utilities & Industry) 1 presentation (Semtech) & 1 presentation (MultiTech) Booth with 4 participants: Semtech, Senet, Ellenex, MultiTech

WORLD AG EXPO February 11-13 (Agriculture) Booth with 9 members: TEKTELIC, Pessl Instruments, Kerlink & IoT America, Orbiwise,

INDIA SMART UTILITY WEEK March 03-07 (Utilities) 1 keynote by SenRa & 1 presentation by Tata Communications Booth with 8 participants: SenRa, Tata Communi- cations, Microchip, L&T, Semtech, Acklio, Sicame, OneNetwork

INNOVATECH DIGITAL September 7-10 (Logistics) 1 keynote on day 1 (Jorge Varona, Semtech) & 1 member panel (Semtech, myDevices, %! #" &%!&"&"&%#%!#



Paige Wireless, ITK, Sensoterra, Waterbit

Microshare, Actility) Virtual exhibit booth

INTERNET OF SUPPLYCHAIN DIGITAL September 29-30 (Logistics) 1 member panel (Oxit, Senet, Semtech)

ENTELEC WEBINAR October 22 (Industry)

REALCOMM DIGITAL October 26-28 (Buildings) Virtual exhibit booth including members MachineQ, Nesten, and TEKTELIC

IOT PROPTECH SUMMIT DIGITAL November 19 (Buildings & Cities) Moderator (Derek Wallace) for The Technology: A Deep Dive into Connected Technology and Platforms Virtual exhibit booth

Member Panel with Chevron, MultiTech, OrbiWise, and Oxit

Click to watch the panel > Virtual exhibit booth Internet of Supply Chain 3

HORIZONTAL EVENTS

27

“The Things Conference offers an opportunity to meet with the global LoRaWAN community and share the value of the LoRa Alliance, membership and certification.”

THE THINGS CONFERENCE January 30-31, 2020 Amsterdam, The Netherlands

“We’re committed supporting and promoting businesses deploying LoRaWAN to enable massive IoT.”

LoRa Alliance CEO and Chairwoman Donna Moore delivered a keynote titled “LoRaWAN ® : The Right Choice, The Right Time. What’s Next? ” on the main stage. In addition to Moore’s keynote, LoRa Alliance ® members delivered the following presentations: • “Evolution of the LoRaWAN Specification” Alper Yegin, Chair of the LoRa Alliance Technical Committee from member company Actility • “Regional Parameters and Global Regulation” Dave Kjendal, Chair of the LoRa Alliance Regional Parameters Working Group from member company Senet • “LoRaWAN Certification” Derek Hunt, LoRa Alliance, Director of Certification

DESTINATION LoRaWAN ®

28

THE POWER OF LoRaWAN ® The first event focused on “The Power of LoRaWAN.” It included a look back at the advancements behind LoRaWAN technology in honor of the LoRa Alliance’s fifth anniversary. It also showcased the myriad achievements of the technology, LoRa Alliance members, and how LoRaWAN is driving business value. Member companies CareBand, Kerlink, Milesight, and MultiTech shared their LoRaWAN for Good projects illustrating how the technology supports the United Nations’ 17 Sustain- able Development Goals. The Amazon Web Services (AWS) keynote featured Michael MacKenzie, GM, AWS IoT Connec- tivity & Control Services and Karthik Ranjan, AWS LoRaWAN Ecosystem Leader, who showcased how AWS is accelerating IoT connectivity with LoRaWAN. In December 2020, the com- pany launched a new platform that allows users to easily and quickly connect and secure LoRaWAN device fleets at scale and accelerate IoT application development. Three live webcasts had 1,141 registrations from 80 countries around the globe and 790 viewers, with people continuing to view on demand each day. Visit our interactive space for all things LoRaWAN . Register for upcoming and view previous webcasts, download technical documents, visit member spotlight pages, watch videos, and learn more about how LoRaWAN is driving business growth around the globe.

DESTINATION

Destination LoRaWAN ® is a webcast series that kicked off on December 16, 2020 and will run throughout 2021. Through Destination LoRaWAN, industry leaders from inside and outside of the LoRa Alliance ® ecosystem will demonstrate the power LoRaWAN has to affect change in the world today. The series will bring information and updates about LoRaWAN and the LoRa Alliance to regions around the world, with webcasts in local languages and featuring region-specific market and technology experts. The topics will engage all audiences, from developers to end-users, who want to learn more about LoRaWAN technology and how LoRa Alliance membership drives business value for members.

LoRaWAN ® AMBASSADOR SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

29

Smart Utilities and Municipalities Congress Smart City Technologies, Alper Yegin, Actility

DistribuTech International 2020 Connecting Broadband to Sensor networks through Standard-based Dedicated Networks, Daniel Quant, MultiTech New Digital Applications with LoRaWAN ® for Utilities and Cities, Rémi Demerlé, Semtech The Things Conference LoRaWAN ® Regional Parameters: What is it, what’s new, and what’s next?, Dave Kjendal, Senet Evolution of the LoRaWAN ® Specifications, Alper Yegin, Actility India Smart Utility Week New Technologies, Innovations and Trends in City Gas Distribution, Dharmendra Tomar, Tata Water Resource Utilization: Future Strategy, Innovations & New Approach for Emerging Technologies, Ali Hosseini, SenRa MCS Knowledge Café Webinar – Schiphol Airport Case Study IoT and Big Data in a Private LoRaWAN ® Network, Charles Paumelle, Microshare Click here to watch >

IoT World & 5G Connectivity Conference Harnessing the power of LoRaWAN ® for deploying your LPWAN IoT applications, Karthik Ranjan, AWS

ENLIT 365 Datatopia Podcast Rémi Demerlé, Semtech Click here to watch > WALIDKHOURY.COM Webinar – Global Water Experts Series Smart Water Applications, Dave Kjendal, Senet Click here to watch >

LoRaWAN ® AMBASSADOR SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

30

IDC Briefing David Smith, Crescent NV

INTERGEO Digital, Smart City Solutions stage Smart City – Buzzword or Reality, Yannik Kopp, LORIOT

Smart Cities Week Connectivity, Security, and How Cities Can Track their Data Using LoRaWAN ® , Sara Brown, MultiTech; Nicolas Jordan, Actility; Wael Guibene, Charter Communications; Boris Stöckermann, Minol ZENNER Group Click here to watch > How Cities are Solving Challenges all Over the World Using LoRaWAN ® , Jack Stuart, TEKTELIC; Yannik Kopp, LORIOT; Tony Tilbrook, NNNCo; Jose Fernandez, Aonchip Click here to watch >

IoT Tech Expo North America Connectivity is Key; IoT’s role during a Pandemic, Christian Olivier, Actility

MELITA Workshop LoRaWAN ® in Europe and strategic role for Germany, Rémi Lorrain, Semtech

IoT Online Conference How to Design a Multi-Technology Outdoor-Indoor Tracking Device, Nicolas Jordan, Abeeway LoRaWAN & NB-IoT Complementary Deployment: City of Kyiv Use Case, Olivier Hersent, Actility ITU and CITC of Saudi Arabia Workshop Spectrum Exclusive and Open Access: Turning Artificial Scarcity into Abundance, Fabien Migneret, LoRa Alliance

WEBSITE FEATURES

31

HOW LoRaWAN ® CAN HELP FIGHT COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic confronted the world with unprecedented challenges, more governments and government institutions issued calls for help to fight the Coronavirus. Several incredible members of the LoRa Alliance ® ecosystem stepped up to answer those calls by providing solutions, communities during this challenging time. These solutions are viable, read- ily available, and in some cases already deployed to hard-hit areas of the globe. technology, tips and resources to help our

WEBSITE FEATURES

32

LoRaWAN ® FOR GOOD

Adopted by United Nations Members in 2015, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides a roadmap for a more sus- tainable planet now and for years to come. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent the elements every country and organization must strive toward for a peaceful and prosperous planet. As the de facto platform for low power wide area network (LPWAN) connectivity for the Internet of Things (IoT), the LoRaWAN standard is abundantly utilized in use cases that support these global goals. Our members are answering this call with numerous use cases that exemplify tech for good.

WEBSITE FEATURES

33

LoRaWAN ® IS SECURE

Securing an Internet of Things (IoT) deployment and keeping it safe and secure is not only a matter of choosing the right communication protocol, it also requires utilizing implementation best practic- es and adhering to industry security standards. The LoRa Alliance ® has always kept security front and center in its development of the LoRaWAN specification, which has been designed from the outset with secu- rity as an essential aspect, providing state-of-the-art security properties that meet the needs of highly scalable low-power IoT networks.

LoRaWAN ® SECURITY

LoRaWAN ™ SECURITY

FULL END–TO–END ENCRYPTION FOR IoT APPLICATION PROVIDERS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

01. Where are the LoRaWAN ® security mechanisms specified?

04. What kind of identifiers are used in LoRaWAN?

All security mechanisms are defined in the LoRa Alliance ® specifications, which can be downloaded by the public from https://lora-alliance. org/resource-hub. This FAQ is based on the LoRaWAN L2 1.0.3 specification.

Each end-device is identified by a 64-bit globally unique identifier, DevEUI, that is assigned either by the manufacturer or the owner of the end-device. Allocation of DevEUI identifiers require the assignor to have an Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI) from the IEEE Registration Authority. Each Join Server, which is used for authenticating the end-devices, is also identified by a 64-bit globally unique identifier, AppEUI/JoinEUI, that is assigned by either the owner or the operator of that server. Open LoRaWAN networks and private LoRaWAN networks that are collaborating (roaming) with the open networks are identified by a 24-bit globally unique identifier, NetID, assigned by the LoRa Alliance. When an end-device successfully joins a network, it gets a 32-bit ephemeral device address, DevAddr, assigned by the serving network.

02. How do the LoRa Alliance specifications ensure secure operation of LoRaWAN networks?

LoRaWAN supports mutual end-point authentication, data origin authentication, integrity and replay protection. It also enables end-to- end encryption of the application payload between the end-device and its counter-part on the network side, the Application Server. LoRaWAN supports a mode of operation that allows encryption of the MAC commands. All of these procedures rely on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) and use 128-bit cryptographic keys and algorithms. 03. Are there any differences between the Activationby- Personalization (ABP) and Over-the-Air-Activation (OTAA) methods in terms of security? LoRaWAN uses static root keys and dynamically-generated session keys. Root keys are only provisioned in OTAA end-devices. They are used to derive session keys when the OTAA end-device executes a Join Procedure with the network. An OTAA end-device, when installed in the field, will be able to connect to any network that has an interface to the key server, the Join Server, to which the end-device is associated. Session keys are used by the end-devices to protect the over-the-air traffic. ABP end-devices are not provisioned with the root keys. Instead, they are provisioned with a set of session keys for a pre-selected network. The session keys remain the same throughout the lifetime of an ABP end-device. OTAA should be preferred over ABP for end-devices in need of higher levels of security.

05. Can I randomly assign any identifier to my device or my network?

A WHITE PAPER PREPARED FOR THE LoRa ALLIANCE™ BY GEMALTO, ACTILITY AND SEMTECH February 2017

No. Please see question #4 about the assignment authority for each identifier. Not following these guidelines would cause identifier collision and unpredictable behavior in your network deployment (similar to what happens when using the same Ethernet MAC address on multiple devices attached to the same LAN).

06. Are all end-devices equipped with the same “default” cryptographic key when leaving the manufacturer?

No. There is no concept of a “default key” or a “default password” in LoRaWAN. All end-devices are required to be equipped with unique keys when they leave the manufacturer. As a consequence, any compromise of a key from one end-device will not have an impact on other end- devices.

07. What kind of cryptographic keys are used?

An OTAA end-device is provisioned with a root key called the Application Root Key (AppKey). On the network side, AppKey is provisioned on the Join Server, which may or may not be co-located with the Network Server.

WEBSITE FEATURES

34

PRIVATE LoRaWAN ® NETWORKS

LoRaWAN is unique in the low power wide area network (LPWAN) wireless communication technology space in that it has multiple deploy- ment and business models to solve the myriad needs of IoT use cases and applications globally. Deploy- ment options include Pubic, Private and Hybrid networks, and OPEX and CAPEX solutions provide financial flexibility. Public LoRaWAN networks are a great solution for many LP- WAN IoT use cases and have been serving the global IoT market for years and will continue to do so for many, many more. However, private LoRaWAN networks are a great solution for a wide variety of IoT use cases that give users more control over network location, operating models, timing and features, plus the ability to support your specific application requirements today and in the future.

Private Network Use Cases

Harnessing the Power of LoRaWAN for Deploying Your LPWAN IoT Applications Karthik Ranjan North America Regional Vice-Chair LoRa Alliance®

#IoTWorld @iotworldseries

TWITTER PERFORMANCE

35

We have successfully continued to grow our Twitter presence gaining 1.5k new followers, ending the year with 14,450. This year we have gained momentum with an increase of followers through our informational and education-focused strategy to share the benefits of LoRaWAN ® .

2020 FOLLOWERS: 14,450

2020 TWEETS: 961

2020 IMPRESSIONS: 1,975,100

2020 AVERAGE IMPRESSIONS/MONTH 164,592

2020 AVERAGE ENGAGEMENT RATE: 1.18%

2020 RETWEETS: 2,444

2020 AVERAGE LINK CLICKS/DAY: 13

2020 RETWEETS/DAY: 7

2020 LINK CLICKS 4,728

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/loraalliance

LINKEDIN PERFORMANCE

36

LinkedIn was a major aspect of our social media strategy and activity in 2020. Increasing our audience by 28.5%, this year we are successfully ending the year with 16,572 followers. This tremendous growth was driven by our increased number of LoRaWAN ® focused posts and our highly engaged ecosystem sharing and reposting content about the LoRa Alliance ® and LoRaWAN capabilities.

2020 TOTAL UNIQUE VIEWS: 7,037 38.42/DAY

2020 TOTAL PAGE VIEWS: 14,663 80.06/DAY

2020 TOTAL FOLLOWERS: 16,572

2020 IMPRESSIONS: 1,128,722 94,060/MONTH

2020 AVERAGE LINKCLICKS/DAY: 59.2

2020 LINK CLICKS: 21,621

2020 REACTIONS: 12,287 1,024/DAY

2020 AVERAGE SHARES/DAY: 3.36

2020 ENGAGEMENT RATE: 3.84

FOLLOW US ON LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/loraalliance

LoRaWAN ® NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 2020: 27,800 MENTIONS 16

37

175 TIER 1 ARTICLES

PRESS RELEASES

LoRa ALLIANCE SETS STRATEGY AROUND SPECTRUM, FUNCTIONALITY, “KICK- ASS” USE CASES

LoRaWAN HELPS RIDE THE SMART- FARMING WAVE

EXPANDED DEVICE CERTIFICATION PROCESS TO ACCELERATE LoRaWAN MARKET GROWTH

Robin Booker Published: March 5, 2020

James Blackman Published: January 31, 2020

Alix Paultre Published: June 17, 2020

READ ARTICLE >

READ ARTICLE >

READ ARTICLE >

5G CONSIDERS LoRaWAN TO MEET IOT DENSITY GOALS

CONECTANDO AL PLANETA DE FORMA INTELIGENTE CON LoRaWAN

EP. 5 | LoRaWAN: THE THINGS NETWORK AND LoRa ALLIANCE TALK OPEN IOT

Phil Hunter Published: May 26, 2020

READ ARTICLE >

Webinar: Donna Moore Published: March 3, 2020

Dave Finch Published: July 10, 2020

VIEW WEBINAR >

VIEW PODCAST >

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51

lora-alliance.org

Made with FlippingBook Ebook Creator