Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | February 2020

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

2020 PRIMARY ELECTION GUIDE

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 6  FEB. 3MARCH 2, 2020

20candidatesvieforUS CongressDistrict22seat Voter results trending towardblue in a typically red area of Fort BendCounty BY BETH MARSHALL For the rst time in over a decade, Republican incum- bent Rep. Pete Olson’s name will not appear on the ballot for U.S. Congress’ District 22, encompassing much of Fort Bend County and portions of Brazoria andHarris counties. Roughly half of the candidates running for District 22 in the March 3 primaries are from Fort Bend County, and a majority of those candidates are from Sugar Land, accord- ing to the Texas secretary of state’s oce. Voters will nd 15 Republican candidates and ve Dem- ocratic candidates on the March 3 primary election ballot. “That’s Fort Bend County with all the growth and all the diversity,” Olson said. “That shows people are paying attention.”

22 DISTRICT CANDIDATES

Pierce Bush

Jon Camarillo Douglas Haggard Aaron Hermes

Greg Hill

Matt Hinton

Dan Mathews

Diana Miller

Troy Nehls

Brandon T. Penko

Olson announced he will not seek re-election over the summer, and 20 candidates have led to take his place. Pete Olson

Shandon Phan Bangar Reddy Howard Steele Kathaleen Wall

Joe Walz

Chris Fernandez

Sri Preston Kulkarni

Nyanza Davis Moore

Carmine Petrillo III

Derrick A. Reed

For candidate Q & A's, visit communityimpact.com .

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BY CLAIRE SHOOP FBISD treatsmental healthneeds on campuses The school-based, grant-funded centers serve victims of crime for free

“THERE ARE CLEARLY MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES AT ALL OF OUR CAMPUSES THAT NEED TO BE ADDRESSED.” STEVE SHIELS, FORT BEND ISD DIRECTOR OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Christa McAulie and Missouri City middle schools; and Rosa Parks and Briargate elementary schools—are funded by a $1.5 mil- lion grant awarded under the 1984 federal Victims of Crime Act. Steve Shiels, FBISD’s director of behavioral health and well- ness, said by opening these clin- ics the district is taking a big step in addressing the mental health

needs of school-age children, the stigma around mental health and school safety concerns. “Data shows that in the last ve years, the mental health needs of students were just really beyond the scope of what a school was able to deal with well, and that it was a really big challenge for students who are not getting the support

The rst wave of Fort Bend ISD’s campus-based mental health cen- ters opened the week students returned from winter break with at least one full-time, clinically licensed therapist per campus serving students at eight schools. The centers—located at High- tower, Marshall and Willowridge high schools; Lake Olympia,

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IMPACTS

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