Jones Smiles - December 2017

THE WELLNESS

REPORT

December 2017

770-965-3048

www.JonesSmiles.com

Wishing You a Very

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

-from the Jones Smiles Team

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Published by The Newsletter Pro • www.thenewsletterpro.com

In the years since “Man’s Search for Meaning” was written, it seems we’ve forgotten a lot of its advice. The Centers for Disease Control found that 4 out of every 10 Americans do not have a satisfying life purpose, and yet, 60 percent of Americans say they are happy. What gives? It comes down to the pursuit of happiness versus pursuing meaning in life. It’s the difference between “I’m going to buy this dress because it will make me happy” and “I’m going to volunteer at a shelter because it will be meaningful.” Happiness involves satisfying an immediate need, whereas finding meaning focuses on making choices that give us a sense of purpose. Even more telling, the Journal of Positive Psychology found that meaningful acts usually involve giving, but reaching happiness often means taking. Because of this, leading a meaningful life, while often more challenging, is also more satisfying. Is it possible that the pursuit of a meaningful life will lead us to happiness? Absolutely. Just don’t expect it to be an everlasting condition. Think of happiness the way psychologist Frank T. McAndrew does: “Recognizing that happiness exists — and that it’s a delightful visitor that never overstays its welcome — may help us appreciate it more when it arrives.” GIVE UP THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS

How many books have you seen with the word “happiness” in the title? A lot, right? It’s such a popular topic because the pursuit, journey, and, ultimately, achievement of happiness is supposed to be the key to a fulfilling life. Happiness is the ultimate human condition; reaching it is our purpose and will bring us contentment. But before you pick up that guide to happiness, there’s some new data you need to pay attention to. Turns out, we’ve been focusing on the wrong goal. More and more research is supporting the benefit of pursuing a meaningful life over a happy one. Viktor Frankl could be called a leading expert on the topic. Frankl lived through the Holocaust in a concentration camp and saw firsthand how humans deal with unhappy circumstances. As a respected psychiatrist, his observations became the basis for his book, “Man’s Search for Meaning.” Frankl found that the people who stood the best chance of surviving the horrific experience were those who saw some sort of meaning in their lives, even under the bleakest circumstances. For Frankl, this meant providing therapy to others in the camp. As Frankl puts it, once a person finds meaning, they know the “why” of their existence, and they will be able to bear almost any “how.”

WHAT OUR PATIENTS ARE SAYING

“Jones Smiles is hands down the best dentist’s office I’ve ever been to! I’ve had everything done from regular cleanings to an implant to having (multiple) nightguards made, and I’m now doing Invisalign. Every experience I’ve had with the entire staff has been nothing but professional and perfect! A special shout-out to Laurie Broyhill for always making time for me when my dog ruins my nightguard, always being gentle, time efficient, and just hands-down perfect! I won’t be going anywhere else, and I highly recommend this dentist’s office to everyone!”

I trust Dr. Jones and know that the treatment I’m receiving is the very best it can be. I highly recommend Dr. Jones to you.”

–JOYCE S.

“Last week I chipped a front tooth. Today I saw Dr. Eric Jones. My tooth was repaired, and I was out and about in less than an hour! By the way, a no-pain procedure. I highly recommend Jones Smiles.”

–ASHLEY W.

–PEGGY S.

“Finding a competent dentist is quite a challenge. My search is over as I have finally found the best in Dr. Eric Jones at Jones Smiles. He is professional, extremely competent, and takes his time to discuss the procedures with you. He and his entire staff are friendly and professional, and it feels like family when I’m there.

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THE ORIGIN OF SANTA CLAUS

Santa Claus wasn’t always a husky, omniscient gift-giver who circumnavigates the world once a year, propelled by flying caribou and backed by an army of friendly elves. Though the historical St. Nicholas had many of the same generous tendencies as our contemporary “King in the North,” he lacked a high-tech sleigh that could exceed the speed of light. To be exact, St. Nicholas was a renowned Bishop of Myra — an old Roman town near modern-day Demre, Turkey — way back around A.D. 300. Even before he became the bishop, St. Nicholas was known for his generosity. The most famous tale of his charity involved a poor man who could not afford a proper dowry to marry off his three daughters. In those days, this generally meant the daughters would remain unmarried, making it likely that they’d fall into prostitution. Wanting to help, but also wanting to spare the family embarrassment, St. Nicholas traveled to the house at night and threw three purses packed with gold coins through the window. After his death, St. Nicholas became a beloved patron saint, but during the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century, the respect that many Catholic saints received diminished, and his popularity dwindled across Europe.

One area where he remained popular was the Netherlands. There, he lived on as “Sinterklaas,” a mythical figure who went house to house on the eve of St. Nicholas’s nameday, December 5, leaving treats and gifts for children. Sinterklaas traditionally wore red bishop’s clothes and employed elves, and he traveled with horses that could walk across rooftops. When the Dutch emigrated in droves to America during the 17th and 18th

centuries, they brought this kindly icon to the new colonies. Over time, notably through Clement Moore’s 1822 poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas” and a famous 1930s depiction by Coca-Cola ad illustrator Haddon Sundblom, Santa evolved into the figure we see today. THAI SPAGHETTI SQUASH WITH PEANUT SAUCE SMILE-FRIENDLY RECIPES

SUDOKU

Grid n°88160 easy

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Peanut sauce • 1 (14-ounce) can coconut milk • ¾ cup unsweetened peanut butter • ¼ cup coconut sugar • 2 tablespoons soy sauce • 2 tablespoons white vinegar • 2 teaspoons sesame oil • 2 teaspoons red curry paste

• 1 medium spaghetti squash • Olive oil • Salt • 1 garlic clove, minced • ¼ cup chopped parsley • 2 tablespoons crushed peanuts

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1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Halve squash and scoop out seeds. 2. Drizzle inside of squash with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Place squash on baking sheet and roast for 25 minutes. 3. Let cool. Using a fork, scrape out spaghetti squash strands. 4. Place sauce ingredients in saucepan and bring to boil over medium-high heat. Lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. 5. Heat skillet over medium heat. Add garlic, parsley, and 1 of the peanut sauce and combine. 6. Add spaghetti squash and crushed peanuts. Stir to combine until heated through, about 2 minutes. Once served, drizzle with more peanut sauce. (Recipe inspired by Leelalicious.com.)

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We have all the free sudokus you need! 400 new sudokus every week. Make your own free printable sudoku at www.PrintMySudoku.com

770-965-3048 • 3

7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15 Flowery Branch, GA 30542 www.JonesSmiles.com 770-965-3048

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A Message from the Team PAGE1

A Happy Life, or a Meaningful One? What Our Patients Are Saying PAGE2 The Origin of Santa Claus Thai Spaghetti Squash With Peanut Sauce PAGE3 Kick Off the New Year in the Magic Kingdom PAGE4

IS JANUARY THE BEST MONTH FOR DISNEYLAND?

LET’S TALK ABOUT THE WEATHER Does January sound cold and rainy? Don’t worry. The average temperature is still a balmy 66 degrees, and January gets just as much rainfall as peak months like December (winter break) and March (spring break). Check weather reports since the rainfall varies greatly depending on the temperature of the ocean that month. But bear in mind, Disneyland is the No. 2 theme park on the planet, raking in 18 million visitors a year. It wouldn’t attract such huge crowds if the weather wasn’t theme park-worthy 99 percent of the time. So, what’s the best month to visit Disneyland? It’s a trick question. The real answer is whatever month you go. Disneyland is magic! But if there’s a month that’s better than the rest, we’ll say it’s January.

January isn’t known for much — broken resolutions and Martin Luther King Jr. Day, mostly. But if you’re looking to escape the cold or take your family on a post-holiday adventure, next month might be the best time to travel to the Happiest Place on Earth. THE BEST CROWDS According to Disneyland’s own figures, the first full week of January through the middle of February is the slowest time of year at the park. Visitors report never spending more than 15 minutes waiting for a ride. The Fourth of July, however, finds visitors waiting over two hours for Star Tours and Splash Mountain. In Winter, Disneyland closes a little earlier. But if you have young kids, this won’t affect your plans much. They often close rides for maintenance during this time, but never more than one or two at a time. With all the open options, you won’t feel robbed.

Photo credit: Carol M. Highsmith/wikimedia commons/Library of Congress

Photo credit: Richard Rosendale/ Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0

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