Bigger & Harman, APC - February 2020

Toll-Free (661) 859-1177 Se Habla Español www.bakersfieldtraffictickets.com HARMAN CALIFORNIA TRAFFIC DEFENSE ATTORNEYS , APC BIGGER

DAILY

THE

DRIVER Attorneys Defending Your Right to the Road

FEBRUARY 2020

EVERYTHING BUT THE UNIFORM LAWYERS VS. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL MANAGERS

While my team’s Super Bowl hopes may have been dashed this year, and March Madness is still on the horizon, I do have one source of sports bliss to tide me over this month. Spring Training is here, and you can bet I’ll be keeping an eye on the Red Sox as they prepare for another season. Beyond just the Sox, I’m always interested to watch the way each manager builds and structures his team. With the recent departure of Alex Cora, I’m hoping the Red Sox finalize the position soon. Without getting too “inside baseball,” I’m an admirer of the work MLB managers do. Not only are they in uniform and in the dugout with the players, but they are also deep in the inner workings of the game. So much of managing a team revolves around learning all the resources they have at their disposal and using them to the best of your ability. Honestly, their job is a lot like being a lawyer. Now, I’m not saying Mark and I are the same as legends like Walter Alston or Joe McCarthy, but there are parallels in both professions. In fact, I’d argue that the qualities a team owner looks for in a new manager are the same people seek out when they need a lawyer. It all starts with understanding the game. Ultimately, baseball games and legal cases come down to knowing the odds. If you’ve ever seen “Moneyball,” you know this is true for baseball: Knowing every player’s strengths and weaknesses, as well as those of your opponent, is critical for leveraging game-winning decisions. Likewise, lawyers have to do their best to leverage the factors that go into a case. Just like managers, lawyers have very little control of the factors they have to work with. Just as a manager has little or no control over the players

the team hires, the umpires assigned to a game, or the team they get to play, a lawyer has to work with the evidence they are given, the judges put on their case, and the prosecutors assigned against them. Success in both scenarios hinges on accounting for all these facts and charting the best course of action.

“ESSENTIALLY, A GREAT ATTORNEY HAS TO KNOW WHEN TO BUNT AND WHEN TO SWING FOR THE FENCES.”

Essentially, a great attorney has to know when to bunt and when to swing for the

fences. Fighting for a case to be dropped regardless of circumstances will only result in strikeout after strikeout. Sometimes it’s better to push for a reduced sentence that preserves what’s most important to a client rather than risk everything on a one-in-a-million shot. Mark and I may not have our version of Spring Training — though a trip to Florida sounds nice — but we still take our jobs as seriously as those in the big leagues do, if not more so. After all, much more than a game is on the line when we go to court. We know livelihoods are at stake, and you can rest assured we’ll look for every opportunity to knock it out of the park for you.

Here’s to a great season,

– Paul Harman

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