New Jersey Institute of Balance - January 2018

Jan 2018

BULLETIN

An Optimistic Look Into the New Year

2018 is here with a new array of opportunities for growth. While I’m not a huge New Year’s resolution guy, I do use the beginning of the year to take stock, recalibrate, and focus on what will allow me to be a better husband, dad, public official, and business owner during the coming 365 days.

up: ensuring my wife has a car that can fit three car seats and a booster, making plans for what we’ll do when the three-bedroom apartment fills up with older kids, figuring out the logistics of how I’ll make it to the clinic when my wife is taking care of four kids back home — it’s a lot. Still, I can’t wait to experience that incredible feeling you get when your child is born. When my daughter first came into this world, it was almost certainly the most amazing day of my life. At the time, I never thought I’d be able to experience that again, and then came my son. Now, with the anticipation of having two new children, I just can’t imagine what a profound opportunity I’ve been given. Right now, I feel poised to make 2018 one of the best years yet, both personally and professionally. Honestly, it’s difficult to put my excitement into words. —Dr. Michael Russo

year has reaped huge benefits. Each year, I become a little more reasonable, a little more rational in decision making, and a little more understanding. But the star of the show isn’t the past. It’s the new year and everything that it will bring. Right now, I’m just looking forward to the birth of the two newest additions to my cozy little family in May. My wife and I are optimistically cautious after a few false starts in past years, but so far it’s been smooth sailing. Well, I say smooth sailing, but any parent knows that what I really mean is chaos. It’s a whirlwind preparing for twins. All the little preparations we have to make really add

I’ve practiced this for the past six years, and I’ve tried to spread it to my family. We keep a holistic eye on self-improvement, rather than attempting sweeping changes, which will likely lead to disappointment. I teach my kids the basics of goal setting, encouraging them to pick something to focus on in the new year. Though it’s not always a deep idea they land on — sometimes it’s as simple as keeping their room cleaner in the coming year — I think it’s an important skill to learn. After all, when you know where you’re going, it’s a lot easier to actually get there. Of course, taking this approach makes the whole process a little more intangible and a little more challenging. But I’ve found that taking a moment to reflect on the prior

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