C+S Yearbook of Engineering Achievement 2022

ENVIRONMENTAL + SUSTAINABILITY 2 St. Pete Beach Sea Level Rise Adaptation Alternatives Study - Halff Associates 4 Making Waves in Silicon Valley - Kaynemaile Architectural Mesh 6 Landon School Building Relocation- Wolfe House & Building Movers 12 Private Residence - Mulhern + Kulp 14 The Torre - RLG Consulting Engineers TRANSPORTATION + INFRASTRUCTURE 16 Pelješac Bridge - China Road and Bridge Company (CRBC) 18 Suncoast Parkway 2 from US 98 to State Road 44 - DRMP, Inc. and Dewberry 20 Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project - HNTB Corporation 22 Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) Sky Train® - Lea+Elliott, Inc. 24 CDOT I-70 Bridge Replacement of F-13-S_ Minor - Ulteig Engineers, Inc WATER + STORMWATER 26 Central Waste Water Treatment Plant - Headworks - Baker Concrete Construction, Inc. 28 Lake Shore Drive Drainage Improvements - Baxter Woodman 30 Fish Bayou Control Structure: Bluff Swamp HOUSING + RESIDENTIAL 8 Koula - BASE Engineering 10 Fenton Phase 1- EM Structural & Spanish Lake Flood Risk Reduction Improvements - McKim & Creed Inc. 32 Lick Run VCS and Greenway - Strand Associates 34 Hilton Head National RV Resort - Thomas & Hutton 36 City of Houston - Vortex Companies

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St. Pete Beach Sea Level Rise Adaptation Alternatives Study Halff Associates

Project Location: St. Pete Beach, Florida Project Start Date: 15 September 2020 Project Completion: 19 December 2022 Project Team: Halff Associates

Project Summary: Issues with sea level rise have been a pervasive issue for residents in the DonCeSar neighborhood of St. Pete Beach. The historic Don CeSar community developed in the 1920s is due east of the Don CeSar Hotel. The Little McPherson Bayou, a waterway within the greater Boca Ciega Bay, sits within the neighborhood and is less than 1,000 feet from the Gulf of Mexico. The Pinellas Bayway is north and northeast of the community. Homeowners enjoy beautiful views and have direct access to the water. However, residents are facing challenges associated with rising sea levels, frequently experiencing saltwater flooding of the streets during high tides, king tides and the convergence of tidal and storm conditions. Flooding events obstruct access to homes and damage vehicles. The City of St. Pete Beach is implementing a short-term plan to address these flooding challenges by closing culverts and sloped street ends that provide a conduit for saltwater to enter the neighborhood. Because the culverts and sloped street ends constitute the neighborhood’s only drainage infrastructure, this initial effort replaces them with larger culverts and backflow preventers to keep saltwater out of the streets. The City of St. Pete Beach retained the services of Halff Associates, Inc., to prepare an alternative that would allow the neighborhood to withstand a rise in sea level from approximately 2.5’ to 5’ NAVD 88 by 2050. The firm built a multi-disciplinary team uniting expertise in Public Works, Water Resources and Planning and Landscape Architecture. Tasks in the Adaptation Planning effort included: • field reconnaissance, • the establishment of assumptions regarding sea level rise, • flood mapping to form the basis for the design solutions proposed, • analysis of land use patterns and ownership, and • identification of natural assets that could serve as part of the solution. A landscaped berm behind the seawall will preserve the area’s natural beauty while strengthening the neighborhood’s defenses at the perimeter with a two-tiered system to keep out saltwater. A conceptual plan reconfigures local streets and drainage infrastructure and channels excess rainfall to a deten - tion area in Lazarillo Park to prevent stormwater from inundating neighborhood homes. By lowering the park’s elevation and retrofitting its facilities to withstand intermittent flooding, the neighborhood preserves the amenity while adding storage capacity for stormwater. An advanced pumping system returns stormwater to the Bay. Although this adaptation alternative may require changes in the neighborhood’s layout, this vision also offers opportunities to restore amenities and preserve livability over the next 30 years.

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Making Waves in Silicon Valley Kaynemaile Architectural Mesh

Project Location: Santa Clara, CA Project Start Date: 18 October 2021 Project Completion: 1 June 2022

Project Team: Developer: The Sobrato Organisation, Design Architect: Arc Tec / Architectural Technologies, San Jose, CA, Architect: HNA/Pacific, Los Angeles, CA, General Contractor: Devcon Construction, Milpitas, CA, Installation: BT Mancini, Milpitas, CA, Credit Photography: Lucas Fladz- inski Photography Project Summary: The stunning facade for the Lawson Lane campus in Silicon Valley features Kaynemaile’s new range of three-dimensional, kinetic screens across the parking garage. We worked with design architects Arc Tec and installers B.T. Mancini to complete this stunning facade for the Sobrato Organisation as part of a major office development in Santa Clara CA. Spanning full height and only connecting to the building at the top and bottom meant that the system could be installed fast. Unlike metal or membrane products that require a complex rigid frame and connection system, each Kaynemaile screen on this project has a self-supporting lightweight internal frame connected to vertical stainless steel cables. A ribbon of Kaynemaile Bronze coloured polycarbonate mesh runs over each frame creating a kite- like structure, providing great air flow through the garage. The different locations of each projecting section give contrasting light and shadow effects, enhancing the deep wave across the face. The nature of the stainless steel support system combined with Kaynemaile’s lightweight polycarbonate architectural mesh allows it to move to the wind along the San Tomas Expressway, creating a kinetic, expressive building for passers-by. Kaynemaile’s mesh is made from 100% recyclable engineering grade polycarbonate and manufactured to withstand the demands of high temperature and UV exposure zones, plus it’s durable and easy to maintain. With up to 70% solar reduction and compliant air flow all within a self-supporting package this Kaynemaile system is a beautiful addition to the architecture of Silicon Valley.

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Landon School Building Relocation Wolfe House & Building Movers Project Location: Bethesda, Maryland Project Start Date: 7 July 2022 Project Completion: 31 October 2022 Project Team: Jamin Buckingham, Project Management; Mike Brovont, Project Management; Dan Parbel, Foreman

Project Summary: When Landon School in Bethesda, Maryland, began plans to modernize and expand the buildings at the heart of their 100-year-old campus, they faced the dilemma of how to preserve their architectural heritage while adapting to the changing needs of the school. At the core of this issue was the 9,000-sq-ft Tudor Revival style Andrews House, acquired by the school in the 1930s. The 2½-story building has housed faculty, class - rooms, and offices over the years, and Landon School chose to save this important piece of the school’s history by relocating it to another part of the campus rather than demolishing it. Wolfe House & Building Movers contracted to relocate the 1100-ton structure. Wolfe’s team engineered a platform of steel beams under the building and lifted it with their Buckingham SmartJack System™, then installed 26 Buckingham dollies to transport it to the new location. The Buckingham SmartSteer® Power Dolly System allowed the foreman to drive the masonry building over the 800’ move route, using only a handheld control with touchscreen. When the building was in place over the new footers, Wolfe supported it in place while the new foundation was built under it. Relocating the Andrews House enabled the school to preserve their history and save resources while moving into the future.

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Housing + Residential

Koula BASE Engineering

Project Location: Honolulu, Hawaii Project Start Date: 14 October 2016 Project Completion: 9 September 2022 Project Team: Structural Engineer: BASE; Architect: Studio Gang; GC: Hawaiian Dredging Construction Co.; Owner: The Howard Hughes Corpo - ration Project Accreditations: LEED (in progress) Project Summary: This 41-story mixed-use development features 865,000 SF of built area including a 566-unit residential tower, common and amenity spaces, 58,300 SF of retail space, mechanical and support space, and six stories of above-grade parking. The tower is highlighted by undulating sculpted columns at its exterior facade, evoking red sugar cane reeds that were formerly grown on plantations nearby. The architect describes the exterior design as creating “a fluid, waving facade giving way to residences that bend to the coastline for stunning ocean views, natural light and breezy trade winds.” These architectural columns are constructed entirely of reinforced concrete and were coordinated carefully with the architect to allow for modularization of formwork and simplification of reinforcement while still providing a sculpted and unique defining feature for the tower. Behind the striking exterior, the structure primarily consists of thin, post-tensioned concrete floor plates and reinforced concrete columns and shear walls. In the garage area, long-span post-tensioned beams and floor slabs were provided using a repetitive garage beam forming system to open the floor plan and maximize visibility, ventilation, and the space available for parking stalls. This long-span system also provided for large column-free retail spaces that make up almost 50% of the ground floor area. Post-tensioning was also essential in creating large terraces for gatherings and circulation at the second-floor retail that cantilever almost 16 feet from the supporting columns.

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Fenton Phase 1 EM Structural Project Location: Cary, North Carolina Project Start Date: 1 April 2019 Project Completion: 29 April 2022

Project Team: Hines and Columbia Development, Architect: Nelson Wakefield Beasley, Construction: Samet Corporation and Hoar Construction Project Summary: Fenton is a multi-building mixed-use development in Cary, NC. It is located on 92 acres in the center of the Research Triangle region, and includes office, multifamily, retail, restaurant, and entertainment spaces. The development provides an epicenter of business and recreation, as well as a luxury apartment community. Its innovative design allows for future upfit and expansion without sacrificing quality. EM Structural led the structural design for all fourteen buildings in Phase 1, as well as three precast standalone parking decks. All buildings were designed and constructed concurrently with a goal of opening the entire development at the same time. This unique development required flexibility in many aspects of its structural design, particularly in the office-over-retail buildings. In order to provide a finished look for the retail spaces, the team utilized steel framing over concrete podium, as well as a turn down beam along the perimeter of the buildings. This allows the tenants a seamless and flexible transition and gives the retail spaces a unique façade. In order to create an open concept for the rentable spaces, our team utilized a variety of structural systems including a combination of steel moment framing over concrete podium, requiring extensive architectural coordination. To meet the tight timeline of the project, our team selected structural steel for the majority of the project, based on efficiency and flexibility to modify in the field as necessary. Our selection of structural materials was a major contribution to the constructability of the project, especially as supply chains broke down during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Private Residence Mulhern + Kulp Project Location: Ocean City, New Jersey Project Start Date: 1 April 2020 Project Completion: 1 February 2022 Project Team: Asher Slaunwhite Architects, D.L. Miner Construction

Project Summary: This modern shore home has several unique design features including a floating stair with mitered steel stringers and cantilevered tread supports and a 28’ wide lift-and-slide door on the third floor. A key component of the lift-and-slide door is the ability to slide the door open with the push of a finger. This required heavy steel headers with maximum deflections of 1/8”. Additional mitered steel ridge beams were required to support hipped-roofs with vaulted ceiling inside. Yet, while there was much steel framing, we were able to maintain a light-framed wood construction system for the majority of the home. The biggest challenge came during construction when subsurface conditions revealed an existing boulder sea-wall buried along the rear of the site and under the intended rear wall and porch. It was discovered as piles were being driven and required a fast redesign. The DEP would not permit piles to be located on the opposite side of the boulder wall, given the proximity to the dunes. Additionally, the home is located on an angled site and to move the home back away from the boulder wall was not going to be an option. After some thought and discussion with the design team, we determined that the best method to achieve the design intent would be to cantilever the grade beams over the boulder wall. Supplemental piles were added as close to the wall as possible to support the increased cantilever reactions, and the grade beams were redesigned to cantilever. The rear 3-story porch was also required to extend past the rear house wall and thus required an additional cantilevered structure. After the grade beam design was sent to the field, we commenced on a redesigned second floor framing system with large cantilevered steel beams to support the porch. Through our redesigned framing system we were able to maintain the intended programming of the project with no loss of space for the client and while protecting the natural dunes on site.

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The Torre RLG Consulting Engineers Project Location: Austin, Texas Project Start Date: 3 December 2018 Project Completion: 2 August 2021

Project Team: David Cumming, PE, SE, Principal-in-Charge, Mark Kaiser, PE, Project Manager, Meagan Weaver, PE, Project Engineer Project Summary: The Torre is a residential high-rise tower built in the heart of Austin. It is located directly west of the University of Texas Campus and conveys both industrial and modern luxury. The 18-story concrete framed structure has a wide variety of residential floor plans with 275,000 square feet of living, workspace, and parking. The building also features an amenity deck with a rooftop pool, social media lounge, fitness center, sky lounge, and multiple terraces. As for this complex project, RLG Consulting Engineers worked with Rhode Partners Architects, Parallel Development, and Rogers-O’Brien Con - struction. This team had worked together on several prior high-rise projects, so collaboration was valued, and teamwork was supported. With full participation of the partners, schedule and cost were actively controlled even while the pandemic occurred. Various concrete framing components were integrated and expressed in the final architectural form including diagonal columns and concrete slab soffits. This property had a 62-degree angled stepback line above the 8th floor, which resulted in the need for reducing floor plate areas between Levels 9 and 18. The stepback line and the maximum building height limit provided unique opportunities for the design team. A stair-step pattern of floor plates was developed which allowed for more rentable interior space and more exterior terraces. From the early development concept sketches, RLG was engaged to incorporate solutions from cantilevered slab edges to traditional transfer beams; however, due to the lack of depth in several key areas, the concept idea of a Supertruss was developed. The 3-story Supertruss transfers loads from the rooftop deck to offset column positions below while keeping within the overall building height limits. Shallow post-tensioned concrete beams were used as the top and bottom chords of the truss at Levels 13 and 16. Sloped concrete columns were used as the truss diagonals. The Supertruss was expressed within the individual residential units and expressed overall by use of exterior glass walls. This exposed concrete framing became the showcase signature element of this project.

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transportation + infrastructure

Pelješac Bridge China Road and Bridge Company (CRBC) Project Location: Croatia Project Start Date: 30 July 2018 Project Completion: 31 January 2022 Project Team: Bicheng Tang, Xuefeng Wang, Minghai Pei, Marjan Piperbaher, Goran Legac

Project Summary: The Pelješac Bridge is located at the southern end of Croatia, in the Mali Ston Bay Nature Reserve in the west Adriatic Sea. The bridge established the connection between the northern territory of Croatia and the southern Dubrovnik - Neretva province, avoiding border crossing with Bosnia and Herzegovina on land. The bridge is a steel box girder extradosed cable-stayed bridge with 6 pylons and a total length of 2440m, with a span distribution of 84 + 108 + 108 + 189.5 + 5 × 285 + 189.5 + 108 + 108 + 84 (m). The bridge has 2 abutments and 2 shore piers, one each on both sides of the bay. The remaining 10 piers are in the sea; the average sea depth along the bridge alignment is 27 m. The required minimum navigation clearance was 200m x 55 m. The contractor China Road and Bridge Corporation (CRBC) signed the commercial contract with the client Hrvastske Ceste under the terms of the FIDIC red book with a total cost of 2.08 billion Kuna ( about 283 million Euros). Construction started in August 2018 and it opened on 26 July 2022.

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Suncoast Parkway 2 from US 98 to State Road 44 DRMP, Inc. and Dewberry Project Location: Citrus and Hernando counties, Florida

Project Start Date: 12 February 2018 Project Completion: 28 February 2022 Project Team: DRMP and Dewberry

Project Summary: Tourism, residential development, and flourishing new businesses in Florida’s rural Citrus and Hernando counties outpaced the effectiveness of the counties’ connector roads, which led to the design and construction of the Suncoast Parkway 2, State Road 589 Expansion Project. This $135 million Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise project included the design of 13 miles of a 4-lane All Electronic Toll (AET) facility that increased capacity to ease traffic congestion, improved safety, added interchanges for access, and included several wildlife crossings for safe passage of migratory animals and a multi-use trail for public recreation. But, not without challenges. The 2008 economic recession shelved the project, and Tropical Storm Debby in 2012 caused a portion of State Road 589 south of US 98 to flood, requiring a fast-tracked design of an emergency drainage system to withstand a 100-year rain event. The phased project spans Citrus and Hernando counties from US 98 to State Road 44. The design included 15 bridges and interchanges, which improved accessibility, alleviated capacity, and provided mobility for a good portion of northern Hernando and southern Citrus counties, ultimately creating regional connectivity in West Florida. To engage stakeholders, the project included public participation on the entire extension. The project traversed through heavily wooded areas and skirted subdivisions. A unique aesthetic feature of the project was designing a vertical profile that blends with the natural rolling terrain of the project area. The 4-lane limited access facility also has the ability to be expanded to eight lanes. Overall, the project collectively required extensive coordination between regulatory agencies, permitting, and the public to keep it moving forward. Segments 1 and 2 of the project (13 miles) were completed in February 2022. Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise continues to plan and design to complete the full 27 miles of the Suncoast Parkway 2.

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Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project HNTB Corporation Project Location: Los Angeles, California

Project Start Date: 15 January 2016 Project Completion: 9 July 2022

Project Team: HNTB was the architect of record and engineer of record. The design team included Michael Maltzan Architecture and Dissing+Weitling, architecture; Hargreaves Jones, landscape architecture; AC Martin, urban planning; Light Projects Limited, viaduct lighting; EMI, geotechnical engi - neer of record; MGE, viaduct independent check; Pac Rim Engineering, structural design support; V&A, traffic; NCG and Armeni Consulting Services, construction cost estimating; Pacifica Services, environmental permits service; Glenn Kaino, art; Construction Technology Laboratory, mass concrete assessment; and West Wind Laboratories, wind consultant. Construction was led by Skanska USA/Stacy and Witbeck, the construction manager/general contractor. The construction management team included T.Y. Lin International Group, consultant; Psomas, consultant; WJE, concrete repair assessment specialist; Alta Vista, material/fabrication inspection; GPA, SWPPP and environmental compliance; EarthSpectives, CIDH pile compliance; KKCS, schedule review support; ZTC, source inspection; Lenax, change order analysis and IDC, construction engineering. Project Summary: The largest, most complex bridge project in Los Angeles history, the Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project sets a new threshold for seismic safety and expands the utility of urban bridges. The new viaduct opened to traffic July 10, 2022, replacing a beloved double steel arch landmark with 10 pairs of sculptural arches unspooling 3,060 feet across an industrial lowland. The largest, most complex bridge project in L.A. history, the structure advances the field of seismic bridge engineering and the engineering profession with a series of innovations. Designed to remain undamaged and opera - tional after a seismic event with a 1,000-year return period, the viaduct is believed to be the world’s longest, seismically isolated concrete tied arch bridge. It features the first U.S. application of seismic isolators within the verticality of a bent, the world’s first use of triple-pendulum friction bearings modified to stiffen after a predetermined displacement, the first U.S. bridge to use post-tension couplers and Caltrans’ first use of grade 80-ksi concrete. Further, the viaduct is designed to serve multiple purposes: • Ensure greater public safety, preserve mobility and encourage multimodal travel • Instill civic pride and sense of place as a world-class Los Angeles icon • Increase transportation equity in the community of Boyle Heights • Unify Boyle Heights with the Arts District of Los Angeles • Provide safe, direct access to a future 12-acre public park below the viaduct • Instantly transform into a civic venue • Serve L.A. for the next 100 years with minimal maintenance The new Sixth Street Viaduct will provide a cinematic backdrop for movies and everyday life for generations to come. In a city of stars, it is a star in its own right. And much like the city itself, there is not another like it anywhere on earth.

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Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) Sky Train® Lea+Elliott, Inc.

Project Location: Phoenix, Arizona Project Start Date: 1 January 1999 Project Completion: 31 December 2022

Project Team: Diane Woodend Jones, Darryl Jaquess, Ron Sheahan, Christian Gonzales, Greg Childers, Gustavo Cevallos, Glenn Bonita, Jack Norton, Scott Kutchins, Ted Barker, John Graddy, Aaron Hester, Matt Sturgell, Brian Yeschenko, Chris Gambla, Laura Espinoza, Melinda Ring, Curtis Newton, Craig Elliott, Carissa Cyprien, Doug Draper, Sophia Mucino, Donna Gaut, David Ewing, Denny Hinish, Alex Robbins, Nate Yemane Project Accreditations: LEED Gold Project Summary: Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) developed an automated people mover (APM) system that connects parking, ter - minals, the regional light rail system, a ground transportation center, and the rental car facilities. The purpose of the APM is to relieve surface roadway transportation and terminal curb congestion by eliminating the need for eighty circulator buses and allow the airport to grow from ~40 million annual passengers to a future capacity of 60 million annual passengers. Improving passenger convenience and optimizing level of service with a reliable, state- of-the-art APM that operates on a dedicated right-of-way will enhance the overall efficiency of one of America’s fastest-growing airports. In 2021, the airport ranked as the ninth busiest in the country. The APM system is the focal point of a world-class infrastructure project that includes stations, five miles of mostly elevated dual-lane guideway, a maintenance facility, and a connector bridge to the light rail station. A unique feature of the APM system is the guideway crossing over a taxiway one hundred feet above providing a spectacular view of the airport and Phoenix metro area to passengers. This was an engineering feat among many others in the project that required close collaboration between many entities to provide a successful outcome. The City of Phoenix selected Lea+Elliott, Inc. to serve as the APM System Designer and Owner’s Representative for this project. This role included: preliminary system planning and conceptual studies; ridership estimation; propulsion power system definition; facilities design criteria; final system design; procurement; design oversight and quality review; acceptance testing; project administration and operations/maintenance oversight. The design and construction of the APM facilities was implemented in three stages. Stage 1 opened in April 2013 and provides a connection between Terminal 4, the East Economy Parking facilities, and the regional light rail system. Stage 1A opened in early 2015 and extended the Stage 1 system to serve Terminal 3. Stage 2 of the APM system will expand the system to provide a connection to future terminals, a ground transportation center, and the Consolidated Rental Car Facility. Stage 2 will open to carry passengers in late 2022.

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CDOT I-70 Bridge Replacement of F-13-S_Minor Ulteig Engineers, Inc Project Location: Silverthorne, Colorado Project Start Date: 4 March 2020 Project Completion: 30 September 2022 Project Team: Colorado Department of Transportation; EOR - Ulteig Subs - San Engineering; Pinyon Environmental; Collective Marketing; BGC Engineering; Emprise Concepts; Farnsworth Group; Contractor - Kraemer NA Project Accreditations: 100 Year Design Life Project Summary: This project was delivered using the CM/GC delivery method on an accelerated schedule with the contractor providing input throughout the design process. The final design called for two buried bridges consisting of a cast-in-place deck on prestressed adjacent concrete boxes bearing on abutments supported by micropiles. In front of the abutments, soil nail walls minimized the height of the abutment stem walls, which reduced the amount of excavation required. This also reduced impacts to I-70 by shortening the duration of construction phases by building most of the soil nail walls while the bridges were under live traffic. CDOT hasn’t often used micropiles on bridge replacement projects, but they were ideal for the mountainous conditions expected at over 10,000 feet of elevation. This project was also a major roadway reconstruction project necessitating the shift of I-70 westbound 10 feet to the south due to an adjacent landslide. Phasing was a crucial consideration throughout design. The final design called for a four-phase solution with an initial phase shifting traffic away from the median while preparing to overbuild in the median during Phase 2. In Phase 3, traffic was shifted onto the structure built in Phase 2, where the remaining bridge is constructed. In Phase 4, the soil nail walls, grading, and final paving will be completed. The phasing solution allowed for three lanes of traffic to be maintained uphill throughout construction, which was critical given the heavy traffic at 36,000 ADT. Due to the complex phasing and topography, earthwork quantities were presented on a per-phase basis, allowing for greater transparency during construction regarding the movement of earth. The design phase of this project was completed in 10 ½ months after kicking off in March of 2020 just prior to COVID19 lockdowns being implemented. This project was one of CDOT’s first to utilize ProjectWise Share and Bluebeam Revu. Utilizing these pieces of software, we created a collaborative virtual work environment with both CDOT, Kraemer, and the design team accelerating reviews and minimizing redundant feedback.

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water + stormwater + wastewater

Central Waste Water Treatment Plant - Headworks Baker Concrete Construction, Inc.

Project Location: Nashville, Tennessee Project Start Date: 30 December 2020 Project Completion: 20 April 2022 Project Team: Dustin Sholty - Sr. Project Manager, JP Jones Sr. - Superintendent, Julio Crisanto - Area Superintendent, George Orr - Site Safety, Tom Wilder - Quality Control/Inspections, Chip Thomas - Line and Grade Lead Project Summary: The Central Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is currently the largest plant in Nashville, TN. It was originally constructed in 1958 and previously had four major expansions. The headworks of a wastewater treatment plant is the first stage of a complex water treatment process to reclaim wastewater back to EPA regulated levels. It reduces the level of pollutants and solids in the incoming water by screening out debris and large solids. When complete this facility will re - move and separate course and fine debris from incoming wastewater from in and around the Metropolitan Nashville area. This is part of the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program. Part of this program is to reduce combined sewer output (CSO). CSO is where the storm sewer and sanitary are combined from very old sewer systems. During a rain event the storm sewers overwhelm Treatment Plants. The design of this plant incorporated many architectural elements that fit within the historic Germantown buildings, making it appear that it belongs in an otherwise residential area. This is unique for the wastewater industry. Baker was contracted by Garney Construction to perform Division 3 - Concrete Construction The Architect of record was Centric Architecture, and the Engineer was Hazen and Sawyer. Baker self-performed all the concrete scope of work. The scopes of work for the Headworks Structure included the following: Foundation mats/Water retaining walls/ Elevated water retaining structural slabs/Columns/Free standing beams/High bay columns/Complex structural corbels/CIP stairs. The project expanded the facility from 300 million gallons per day (mgd) to 440 MGD. Work began on site in December of 2020 and Bakers’ scope was substantially complete in April of 2022, a fourteen-month duration.

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Lake Shore Drive Drainage Improvements Baxter Woodman

Project Location: Lake Park, Florida Project Start Date: 14 September 2018 Project Completion: 24 February 2022 Project Team: Design & Construction Engineering: Baxter & Woodman, Inc., Electrical Engineering: Smith Engineering Consultants, Inc., Landscape Architecture: Wayne Villavaso Landscape Architecture, Inc. Project Summary: Lake Shore Drive was identified as part of the Town of Lake Park’s capital improvements program. In the early 1960s, new land was created east of the roadway by dredging fill from what is now the Lake Worth Lagoon. As development occurred, the road became a low feature of the overall drainage basin which was constructed with minimal roadway drainage infrastructure. Lake Shore Drive has suffered severe flooding due to king tides and storm surges, worsening each year. The Town has set goals to abate the effects of sea level rise, improve water quality, replace aging infrastructure, and enhance the roadway corridor aesthetics to support existing residents and attract new re-development. An out-of-the-box holistic approach was taken to achieve the Town’s goals by designing a system that works within the constraints of a low-lying closed basin. Lake Shore Drive was prone to frequent flooding with road elevations ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 feet, NAVD. An innovative drainage system was designed to include pumping stormwater up and into a dry detention area/bioswale for water quality treatment before discharging to the Lake Worth Lagoon. The project included potable water, sanitary sewer, landscaping, and lighting improvements along the roadway corridor. The project received a $3.5 million Hazard Mitigation Grant from FEMA and was completed with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on February 24, 2022. The project addresses current flooding issues, king tides and Sea Level Rise (SLR) as well as providing a completely new pedestrian friendly corridor for the area’s residents. The project has already proven its value even before it was finished. In September 2021, residents observed that their road was not flooded by the king tides that were occurring at the time. Flooding was observed elsewhere (offsite) which clearly showed positive results of the project. Two tropical storms have also occurred since completion with no roadway flooding.

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Fish Bayou Control Structure: Bluff Swamp & Spanish Lake Flood Risk Reduction Improvements McKim & Creed Inc. Project Location: Alligator Bayou Road, Ascension Parish, Louisiana Project Start Date: 17 August 2021 Project Completion: 27 September 2022 Project Team: Kimberly Koehl, P.E., Glenn G. Shaheen P.E., Nicolas Schexnayder, E.I., Seth Thibodeaux, Engineer Tech., Mark Maher, Construction Admin., Tim Dantin, Sr. RPR Project Summary: The purpose of the project was to provide flood protection & reduce flood duration of the Bluff Swamp by restoring the conveyance of Fish Bayou into Bayou Manchac with the construction of (2) 12’x12’ RCB control structures controlled by SCADA. The Fish Bayou Channel was obstructed by the construction of Alligator Bayou Road and this project restores the channel conveyance system. Alligator Bayou Road was constructed by the Louisiana DPW in the 1950s and currently acts like a levee, shielding high water in Bayou Manchac from the Bluff Swamp and Spanish Lake drainage basins. This leveeing of the natural flooding process has also resulted in negative impacts to the wetlands within Bluff Swamp. Sluice gates were installed on the box culverts in order to prevent back water flooding from Manchac during high water events and to allow for conveyance of flow from the swamp once high-water levels in Bayou Manchac reside. This area had inadequate infrastructure which prevented the Bluff Swamp from efficiently draining during high water events in the basin and caused the area to remain inundated until flood waters outfall through the existing 60’’ drainage structure at Frog Bayou. Due to the previous structure size limitations, the Bluff Swamp sub-basins remained inundated for a period of two months during the August 2016 flood event. Under the operating plan, the new box culverts will remain open during low water events and close once Bayou Manchac reaches elevation 4.0’ and increasing. This protects both Iberville and Ascension Parishes from backwater flooding along Bayou Manchac. The gates will remain closed until the waters along Bayou Manchac reduce enough to create a head differential which promotes drainage of Bluff Swamp and Spanish Lake. This new infrastructure will reduce flood risk for Ascension Parish residents and minimize erosion in Bayou Manchac by utilizing rip rap to moderate flows. The rock armoring is used as shoreline protection and to direct the flow of Fish Bayou into Bayou Manchac. A weir was constructed upstream of the structure within Bluff Swamp so that water will remain in the swamp continuously which has ecological benefit to the wetlands within Bluff Swamp. Project was completed on time and on budget.

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Lick Run VCS and Greenway Strand Associates Project Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Project Start Date: 1 July 2009 Project Completion: 1 October 2022 Project Team: Client- Metropolitan Sewer District of Cincinnati, Design Team- Human Nature, Inc.; Sustainable Streams, LLC; Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson, Inc.; Kolar Designs, Inc.; CID Irrigation, Inc.; Gray & Pape, Inc.; Hull & Associates, LLC Project Summary: The $103 million Lick Run Valley Conveyance System (VCS) and Greenway Project is one of the largest green infrastructure proj - ects for reducing combined sewer overflows (CSO) in the country. This 1.5-mile corridor provides watershed management, flood control, stormwater conveyance, storage and reuse, and water quality treatment, all integrated into an open channel and civic park complementing the South Fairmount neighborhood’s historical and cultural charm. The channel and surrounding greenspace are the principal elements of the project and are also proving to be a catalyst for redevelopment of this once blighted neighborhood. The 2,700-acre Lick Run Watershed contains the Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati’s (MSDGC) largest CSO. In response to a USEPA consent decree, the project team identified that by re-establishing the Lick Run waterway from its 19-foot-tall, brick combined sewer, constructed 120 years earlier, MSDGC could save millions of dollars over the traditional deep tunnel conveyance system, while providing the community a focal point for economic redevelopment. Highlights: • Entering the Lick Run Greenway from downtown Cincinnati, the civic park and water quality storage pond provide a welcoming vista. The 1.8-acre pond provides settlement for runoff and reuses as a base flow for the surface channel via a recirculation system. • A headwater feature is at the beginning of the 1-mile, rock-lined surface channel. The weirs in the structure regulate the flow going into the surface channel. • An innovative hybrid design with a rock-lined channel over a subsurface box conduit maximizes the use of limited horizontal space within the corridor. Separated stormwater flows from the hillsides surrounding the project area for up to a 25-year rainfall event are conveyed mostly through the subsurface box conduit. Storms up to the 100-year event are conveyed through a combination of the box conduit and the surface flood control channel. • The surface channel flows between two major transportation arterials. Blighted structures were replaced with a tranquil park setting that includes a playground and more than 2 miles of shared-use paths and sidewalks. • Roads and intersections at each cross street were reconstructed and five new bridges were added to provide vehicle and pedestrian access across the channel.

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Hilton Head National RV Resort Thomas & Hutton Project Location: Beaufort County, South Carolina Project Start Date: 21 May 2019 Project Completion: 1 February 2022

Project Team: Thomas & Hutton (Civil Engineer), Witmer Jones Keefer, Ltd. (Landscape Architect/Land Planner), Grady Woods Architects (Archi - tect), Terracon (Geotechnical Engineer), DendroDiagnostics (Arborist), Newkirk Environmental Inc. (Environmental Consultant), Coastal Surveying (Surveyor), Bihl Engineering (Traffic Engineer), Choate Construction Co. (General Contractor), and J.H. Construction (General Contractor). Project Summary: The sport of golf relies heavily on the expanse and variety of a course. The allure of a distinct golf experience presents a reasonable challenge to players against a backdrop of natural beauty. When Hilton Head National Golf Club lost 27 acres to right-of-way acquisition for Bluffton Parkway construction, Thomas & Hutton client, Scratch Golf Company faced a significant challenge. Nine of their 27 holes became unplayable, three of which were in the direct path of the planned parkway. Hilton Head National experienced a considerable loss of revenue and began to reevaluate the experience they could provide golfers and visitors to the Lowcountry. Scratch Golf seized the opportunity to repurpose the disconnected course and capitalize on the national trend of reexamining the use of open space and growing “work from anywhere” movement. The luxury RV resort is a by-right use under land development ordinances and a passive use that would generate income for Scratch Golf out of the land cut off by right-of-way acquisition. The vision was for Hilton Head National golfers and visitors to the region alike to play and stay at the resort. T&H provided civil design, master pump station design, off-site force main design, nationwide wetland permit assistance, permitting, and construction services for the 60-acre Hilton Head National RV Resort. The property features 341 sites and elevates the standard RV experience offering resort-style amenities including a trail, beach entry pool with lazy river, restaurant, tiki bar, dog park, and playground. The resort is configured with multiple site layouts, accommodating various visitor preferences. Repurposing the golf property posed several challenges, namely promoting positive drainage on the site. T&H designed a storm system that incorporated the existing ponds, doubling as an amenity. A leisure trail was incorporated near the ponds, facilitating connectivity, and providing an additional recreational opportunity. Navigating tree cover and existing golf corridors required an efficient site layout. Trees were protected to offer privacy buffers to an environment conducive to RVing. By carefully grading the site, Thomas & Hutton’s design team created a distinctive resort with extensive tree cover that would otherwise have taken years to mature.

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City of Houston Vortex Companies

Project Location: Houston, Texas Project Start Date: 30 June 2020 Project Completion: 1 June 2022 Project Team: Ryan Graham, Steve Henning

Project Summary: As the fourth most populous city in the nation, Houston bustles with nonstop activity day and night. Like many large metropolitan cities, Houston’s public transit system offers light rail service: METRORail. Over 40,000 residents depend on METRORail’s 23-mile system daily. It also connects downtown to the City’s vital medical center district, which is extremely important to patients, doctors, medical students and visitors who rely on it as their primary method of transportation. Houston is under a consent decree, which means the 6,000+ miles of sanitary sewers, 381 wastewater lift stations and 39 wastewater treatment plants are subjected to regulatory commitments. The City’s ongoing extensive inspection of its vast sewer system identified 2.8 miles of 60-inch sanitary sewer suffering from severe I&I and high likelihood of failure due to years of corrosion. This segment is below Fulton Street, a major artery running through downtown Houston that also hosts a METRORail line, which increased the consequence of failure. However, any excavation or access requirements would not only shut down the rail line but also negatively impact businesses, schools, commuters and residents. In addition to safely restoring structural integrity to the impacted pipe, the City also needed to expedite renewal to meet regulatory commitments. The City evaluated multiple options for rehabilitation and selected spin-cast geopolymer lining because of site restrictions. Work was issued on an existing contract with Vortex’s Quadex Lining System® (QLS), a spin-cast geopolymer application process that utilizes GeoKrete® geopolymer. Vortex designed an innovative internal bypass system that avoided road and light rail closures. Following cleaning and extensive patching and repair of the sewer line cracks, voids and offset joints, the contractor spray-applied GeoKrete to non-round areas and obstructions and spin-cast the geopolymer to a 1.5” design thickness throughout the pipe. Following the successful completion of the initial and subsequent work orders, another work order for approximately 4,700 linear feet is in progress. In addition to the minimally disruptive rehabilitation, the high level of cooperation between multiple government and private entities was noted by the City of Houston. From the City’s point-of-view, never before has there been this level of cross-entity cooperation and collaboration, which was so critical to this project’s success.

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