Phillips and Blow PC December 2019

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Come and See Handel’s Messiah! this issue

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The Power of Senior Entrepreneurship

Tips for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions

Managing Difficult Transitions With Trish Johnson

Potato Latkes

Holiday Foods Around the World

Holiday Cuisine Around the Globe What Do Other Countries Eat to Celebrate the Season?

JAPAN: FRIED CHICKEN Thanks to a clever 1970s marketing campaign, the dish of choice for Christmas in Japan is fried chicken — specifically, KFC. Unlike in America, holiday orders in the country come with chocolate cake, roasted chicken with stuffing, and even bottles of Christmas wine emblazoned with Colonel Sanders’ face. “dictates that the eldest daughter dress in a white gown tied with a red sash and a crown of lit candles, then wake her parents with hot coffee and a tray of saffron buns.” Swedes also feast on a casserole called Jansson’s Temptation made with potatoes, onions, anchovies, and cream. SWEDEN: SAFFRON BUNS According to Delish, Swedish tradition

Celebrations of Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa vary from country to country, but there is one thing that unites holiday parties around the world: food. While some American traditions overlap with those of other countries — Peru, for example, shares our love of hot chocolate; England and Canada raise glasses of eggnog; and Italy digs into a version of fruitcake called panettone — there are plenty of dishes beloved all over the world that never make it to the American table. Below, we’ve rounded up a few you might consider exploring this season. COSTA RICA: TAMALES Christmas in Costa Rica wouldn’t be complete without tamales, a savory treat made by stuffing corn dough, meat, garlic, onions, potatoes, and raisins into corn husks or banana leaves. The process of filling and steaming the

tamales can take days, and every family makes their own signature filling.

ETHIOPIA: YEBEG WOT Ethiopians start preparing their Christmas meals as early as October, when they buy the still-live lambs that will eventually go into their savory, spicy lamb stew on the holiday. As with many of the country’s dishes, yebeg wot is scooped up and eaten with injera (teff flatbread). ISRAEL: LATKES Latkes have been synonymous with Hanukkah for more than 900 years, and no Israeli Christmas would be complete without the little potato pancakes cooked symbolically in oil. Despite their long history, though, latkes now vie with sufganiyot — a kind of jelly-filled donut — for a place on the holiday table.

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