OutpatientPT_Get Moving Again After A Herniated Disc

NEWSLETTER

GET MOVING AGAIN AFTER A HERNIATED DISC

Patient Success Spotlight

“They’re fun, friendly and skillfully work on me with care.” “The team at the Auburn location is awesome. They’re fun, friendly and skillfully work on me with care. I love the whole team and wouldn’t trade them for anything.” - D.M.

Doyousufferfrombackorneckpain?Attimesthispaincanradiate indicating a potential problem with the discs. The bones in your spine are called the vertebrae. The vertebrae are held together and in place by ligaments and smalldiscs thatactasshockabsorbers.Thesecontrolyourspine’s rangeof when a disc is damaged, the inside can squeeze out of place and either bulge or herniate, leaving the spinal nerves susceptible to damage. When thisoccurs, the result iscalleda “herniateddisc”, “slipped”or “ruptureddisc.” A herniated disc can be incredibly painful and can cause a great deal of limitations on the body’s movement, thus hindering a person’s movement and overall ability to perform day-to-day tasks. A herniated disc can cause a variety of symptoms including radiating pain down the arm or leg, depending if the herniated disc is in your neck or low back. Bulging discs are the beginning phase of herniated discs. Very often peoplehaveabulging discand don’t even know it. Only when theoutsideof

a bulging disc becomes irritated and affects the surrounding tissue does it begin to cause back ache, generally in the same area and not down the leg. A herniated disc in the neck can be just as painful as a herniated disc in the back. Arm pain from a neck herniated disc is one of the more common neckconditions treatedby our spinespecialists.Although aneckherniated disc may start from injury to the spine, the symptoms, including arm pain, commonly start from poor posture or muscle strains. The arm pain from a neckherniateddiscoccursbecause theherniateddiscmaterial “pinches”or presses on a nerve, causing pain to radiate along the nerve down the arm. Our specialized physical therapists are trained to examine your spine and movement tofind therootcauseofyourproblem.Thenweworkwithyouand your doctor to put together a plan that helps you achieve optimum results Look inside to learn more about our programs and say good-bye to that aching joint pain!

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“Is That Thigh Pain Really Sciatica?”

PHYSICAL THERAPY HELPS RELIEVE SCIATICA PAIN One of the most common mistakes is to assume that all leg pain is sciatica, and must be due to a disc in the back pressing on a nerve. In fact, most leg pain is not pain from the nerve in your spine, and has nothing to do with a herniated disc. There is much confusion about the term sciatica. The term sciatica is defined as pain running down the leg in the path of the sciatic nerve. It isbest tounderstand thedifferencebetween referred legpain,which “refers” from another area and nerve root pain which begins in the spine. Irritation of any of the tissues of the back can cause pain down one or both legs. Seventy percent of patients with back pain have some radiating pain to their legs. This referred pain can come from the tissues, muscles, ligaments, joints, discs or other back structures. It is usually a dull ache that spreads into the buttocks and thighs. In addition, it may affect both legs, however, it usually does not go much below the knee. Referred pain is not due to anything pressing on a nerve. It is not sciatica. Irritation of the nerve root in the spine gives a quite different pain, which is sharp and specific to an area of your leg. Nerve root pain usually radiates to the foot or toes. Patients often describe the pain with sensations such as pins and needles or numbness. It usually affects one leg only and is greater than the pain one has in the back. Nerve root pain is much less common than referred leg pain. Furthermore, if you have back pain alone and no

leg pain or nerve symptoms, a nerve root problem is very unlikely. If you do have leg pain, then your legs should be examined by a physical therapist for signs of nerve irritation or nerve compression. Diagnosing nerve irritation depends on tests that stretch or press on an irritated nerve root to cause pain. Our physical therapists at Outpatient PhysicalTherapy perform different tests for nerve irritation. A common test is raising the leg straight in the air and looking for radiating pain with limitation. Discover how our Spine Program transforms your back pain from a pressing problem, to a distant memory, allowing you to live a happy, active and pain-free life.

Star t Feeling Better Today!

7 Convenient Locations To Serve You!

Puyallup 2930 S Meridian Suite 120, Puyallup, Washington 98373 Phone: (253) 445-2733 Fax: (253) 445-2399

Kent East Hill 13106 SE 240th Street, Suite 103

Covington Satellite 27005 168th Pl SE, Suite 200 Covington, Washington 98042 Phone: (253) 639-4788 Fax: (253) 639-4789

Auburn 701 M St NE, Suite 102 Auburn, Washington 98002 Phone: (253) 833-8766 Fax: (253) 833-6748

Kent, Washington 98031 Phone: (253) 631-1933 Fax: (253) 631-2094

Maple Valley 26837 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road SE, Suite 200 Maple Valley, Washington 98038 Phone: (425) 413-4425 Fax: (425) 413-4429

Kent 8009 S. 180th Street, Suite 112

Covington 16720 SE 271st St, Suite 200 Covington, Washington 98042 Phone: (253) 630-5808 Fax: (253) 630-6438

Kent, Washington 98032 Phone: (425) 226-7827 Fax: (425) 251-5757

AVOID ACHES & PAINS IN THE GARDEN THIS SPRING Common gardening activities, such as digging, planting, weeding, mulching, and raking can cause stress and strain on muscles and joints. This is especially true for senior citizens and people who are normally sedentary. Different body areas such as the shoulders, neck, back, and knees can be vulnerable to injury dering gardening. These tips can help prevent injuries: • If kneeling on both knees causes discomfort in your back, try kneeling on one and keep the other foot on the ground. Use knee pads or a gardening pad when kneeling. • If kneeling or leaning down to the ground causes significant pain in your back or knees, consider using elevated planters to do your gardening.

• Avoid bending your wrist upwards when pulling things or using gardening tools. Instead, keep your wrist straight and use your shoulder muscles to pull and lift. • End your gardening session with some gentle backward bending of your low back, a short walk and light stretching, similar tostretchesdonebeforestarting.

• Warm up before you garden. A 10 minute briskwalkandstretches for thespineand limbs are good ways to warm up.

• Change positions frequently to avoid stiffness or cramping.

•Makeuseofagardencartorwheelbarrow tomoveheavyplantingmaterialsor tools. Be sure to keep your back straight while using a wheelbarrow.

Author: Andrea Avruskin PT, DPT

EXERCISE ESSENTIAL

Traditional Crepes Recipe

Helps Low Back Pain

PRONE ON ELBOWS Lying face down, slowly raise up and prop yourself up on your elbows. Hold for 8 seconds. Repeat 8 times.

Exercisescopyrightof

INGREDIENTS

• 2 eggs • 1 cup milk • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour

• 1 pinch salt • 1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil

Directions In a blender combine eggs, milk, flour, salt and oil. Process until smooth. Cover and refrigerate 1 hour. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat and brush with oil. Pour 1/4 cup of crepe batter into pan, tilting to completely coat the surface of the pan. Cook 2 to 5 minutes, turning once, until golden. Repeat with remaining batter. Garnish with fresh fruit of your choice.

Always consultyourphysical therapistorphysicianbefore starting exercisesyouareunsureofdoing.

Massage Therapy Visit one of our Licensed Massage Therapists at a great low price! $ 75 $ 60 $ 50

per visit

per visit

Single Visit

Four Visits $240 Total

Eight Visits $400 Total

7 Convenient Locations To Serve You!

Puyallup 2930 S Meridian STE 120, Puyallup, Washington 98373 Phone: (253) 445-2733 Fax: (253) 445-2399

Kent East Hill 13106 SE 240th Street, Ste 103 Kent, WA 98031 Phone: (253) 631-1933 Fax: (253) 631-2094

Covington Satellite 27005 168th Pl SE, Suite 200 Covington, Washington 98042 Phone: (253) 639-4788 Fax: (253) 639-4789

Auburn 701 M St NE, Suite 102 Auburn, Washington 98002 Phone: (253) 833-8766 Fax: (253) 833-6748

Maple Valley 26837 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road SE, Suite 200 Maple Valley, Washington 98038 Phone: (425) 413-4425 Fax: (425) 413-4429

Kent 8009 S. 180th Street, Suite 112

Covington 16720 SE 271st St, Suite 200 Covington, Washington 98042 Phone: (253) 630-5808 Fax: (253) 630-6438

Kent, Washington 98032 Phone: (425) 226-7827 Fax: (425) 251-5757

WHEN TO USE ICE & HEAT FOR PAIN RELIEF When you’ve just sprained your ankle or pulled a muscle, all you want is some pain relief. If painkillers are handy, you probably pop a couple of them. If not, you ask for some ice - or was that heat instead? To sort out this confusion, let’s see what they really do. Both ice and heat relieve pain and help recovery. How to use ice minutes is enough. Repeat every 2-4 hours. Our medical experts will help use ice properly for healing and pain relief. How to use heat

Heat packs, bottles or infra-red lamps can be very useful if you have a muscle spasm or 48 hours after injury. Icing a muscle spasm contracts the muscle fibers, so they would hurt intensely. On the other hand, heat improves the circulation, soothes and relaxes the muscles by carrying away toxins and bringing in healing oxygen. Heat can comfort a back or neck strain, especially if it has been persisting for some time. When you use a heat pack, wrap it in a towel and check the temperature so it doesn’t burn the skin. When not to use heat Don’t use heat if you have a painful, red or swollen joint. This increases circulation so that fluid collects, worsening the swelling and stretching or compressing the nerves and surrounding healthy tissue. This makes it still more painful. You’d be better off icing it. When to use neither heat nor ice Whether you use hot or cold packs, be aware that you can damage your skinanddeeper tissuesbycarelessuse.Don’tuse it ifyouhaveanopenor infectedwound. If thecirculation or sensation level is poor, as in diabetes, ice and heat could cause the skin to break down, get infected and worse.

Ice is useful when you want to reduce swelling. For example, your ankle balloons up after a sprain.This is because blood and fluid collect rapidly, making it both painful and stiff. At this point, an ice pack helps to close off those tiny vessels.The blood flow slows down. Small nerves become numb, so the pain reduces. The muscles also relax. The inflammatory reaction issloweddown.Asaresult,yourankle is lessswollenandpainful. Ice packs are very useful in bruises, strains and joint swellings. Use them for any acute swelling, over the first 24 to 48 hours (except back strains). Ice helps later too, while exercising the limb. Our friendly medical experts can show you how to make movements less painful and more flexible by using an ice pack just before or during exercise. How to make an ice pack Wrap a plastic bag of frozen peas or ice cubes in a thick cold wet towel. Place it on the injured part. Check after a few minutes to make sure the skin is not red, an early sign of frostbite. Generally, icing for 15 to 20

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26837 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road SE, Suite 200 Maple Valley, Washington 98038

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INSIDE • Get Moving Again After A Hernitated Disc • Physical Therapy Helps Relieve Sciatica Pain • Exercise Essential

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