CellCheck_Newsletter_January_Final

January Edition 2019

CellCheck ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND NEWSLETTER Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

PROGRAMME NEWS | 03

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR | 05 CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH | 08 RESEARCH UPDATE | 09

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of Teagasc and all our stakeholders to the CellCheck programme.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

Programme update

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to the first CellCheck newsletter of 2019- I hope that you all had a peaceful and relaxing Christmas and New Year, and an opportunity to slow the pace a little before spring ’19 kicks off?! In this month’s issue of the newsletter, our guest contributor from ICOS, Eamonn Farrell looks at some of the milk market predictions, both opportune and challenging, for the coming year. Our monthly tip is a reminder about carrying out a service of the milking machine now while it is quiet before the next lactation kicks off, to make sure everything is running smoothly. Our featured research article this month was published in ‘Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice’, and looks at the role that the milking machine can play in milk quality. Finally, below, I have a brief update on the first phase of the TASAHDry Cow consult, whichwas in action inNovember. Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) Dry Cow Consult The November issue of the CellCheck newsletter introduced and outlined the TASAH Dry Cow Consult, which was launched and open for registration for the month of November. The purpose of the TASAH Dry Cow Consult is to enable farmers to engage with their vet to develop farm-specific selective dry cow strategies, where appropriate. As a brief reminder: • The Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) is funded through the Rural Development Plan 2014-2020. • This was the first year of the ‘Dry Cow Consult’, between trained veterinary practitioners and their clients, with registration open for the month of November only. • To be considered eligible for the free service a dairy farmer had to meet the following criteria: - Bulk milk tank SCC consistently <200,000 cells/mL for the last year; - At least 4 whole herd milk recordings in 2018; - The last milk recording no older than 6 weeks at the time of registration; - A member of HerdPlus on ICBF.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

PROGRAMME UPDATE

Approximately 40 herds around the country that registered for the service successfully met all the eligibility criteria and participated in a Dry Cow Consult with their chosen veterinary practitioner. During the consults, milk recording results and farm records were reviewed, as well as current practices when drying off cows, to help develop and plan appropriate dry cow strategies. In a supported and structured way, most farms were able to identify a cohort of cows that were considered suitable for receiving an internal teat sealant only at drying off. A reminder that all farmers availing of the TASAH service are expected to adopt the following practices: • Record the date of drying off and product used for all cows at the end of the 2018 lactation; • Commence milk recording within the first 2 months of the 2019 lactation; • Following the consult, record any clinical mastitis cases thereafter on ICBF, by SMS or the Animal Events page. Over the coming months, we hope to be able to report directly from some of the participating farmers, on their experience of developing and implementing selective dry cow strategies. It is also expected that delivery of the Dry Cow Consult service will recommence in advance of the 2019 winter dry period.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

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GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Dairy Industry Outlook

Eamonn Farrell, Agri-food policy executive, ICOS

2018 was an extremely challenging year for the dairy industry. Extreme weather events including a prolonged cold and wet spring, followed by a summer drought tested the resolve of the entire industry. The escalation in production costs at farm level due to increased feed usage and costs, brings to the forefront once again, the extreme income volatility facing our family farms. Despite these challenges in 2018, milk production will increase by 3% on 2017 levels. As a result, the Food Harvest target of 50% more milk above the 2007-2009 average will be achieved in 2018, a full two years ahead of schedule. There is no doubt that Brexit is to the forefront of all our minds at the present time. However, it is no exaggeration to state that environmental sustainability is of equal importance, if not, of greater importance to the long-term future of the dairy industry. Increasingly, there is a greater domestic focus on the agricultural sector and its contribution to climate change. It is a reality that agriculture contributes up to a third of our national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, above the global and EU average. This is because of the lack of heavy industry in the wider economy. However, it is also a reality that Irish agriculture is themost carbon efficient in Europe due to our grass-based system. Furthermore, over 95%of dairy farmersareparticipating in the Sustainable Dairy Assurance Scheme (SDAS)

The availability of skilled labour is also a pressing issue facing the dairy sector in 2019. The challenge was outlined in the People in Dairy Project, which identifies the need for 6,000 people to enter dairy farming by 2025. This is made up of 2,000 new employment opportunities and 4,000 people to provide for regeneration of existing dairy farmers.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

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DAIRY INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

under Origin Green, which requires the completion of a carbon footprint every 18 months. As a result, SDAS has enabled Ireland to position itself as a partner of choice globally for sustainably produced and quality assured dairy products. In addition, food production systems throughout the world will have to provide 70% more food to feed a growing global population, which is expected to exceed 9.8 billion people by 2050. It is also important to remember that there is simply no other industry generating wealth, investment and jobs to any significant scale in rural Ireland. It is estimated that additional milk production from 2016 to 2020 will result in a €2.7 billion benefit to the economy or €540 million annually. Dairy farming provides a sustainable livelihood, despite extreme volatility in income from one year to the next. It is a legitimate aspiration of farmers to fully develop the potential of their farm enterprises, to secure better incomes and to provide better futures for their families. That said, the dairy industry does acknowledge the importance of the environment and our responsibility to develop in a sustainablemanner following decades of stagnation due to the imposition of quotas that severely impeded the sector and disadvantaged thousands of farm families. In 2018, an industry working group published a report called ‘Positive steps towards a low carbon future for the Irish dairy sector’ outlining 11 recommendations for industry and policy makers. We identify a range of technical and cost-effective mitigation options that ICOS believes should be incorporated into a structured knowledge sharing programme on climate change mitigation. Many of

these measures were also identified by Teagasc in its Marginal Abatement Cost Curve such as improved EBI, using protected urea and switching to trailing shoe technology. The emphasis on measures that have cross cutting benefits for ammonia emission reduction and improved water quality is essential. The newly established Agricultural Sustainability Support and Advisory Programme is another extremely positive industry led initiative, working together with Teagasc to provide a free advisory service to improve water quality standards. As an industry we must be conscious of the pitfalls that have affected other countries, most notably the Netherlands in relation to phosphates. The challenge will be to protect economic prosperity in rural Ireland, while balancing our obligations in relation to environmental sustainability and global food security. The availability of skilled labour is also a pressing issue facing the dairy sector in 2019. The challenge was outlined in the People in Dairy Project, which identifies the need for 6,000 people to enter dairy farming by 2025. This is made up of 2,000 new employment opportunities and 4,000 people to provide for regeneration of existing dairy farmers. From a strategic perspective, it is vital to facilitate career pathways in the dairy sector and to attract new entrants into dairy farming, as a positive and worthwhile career choice. There are increasing demands on the dairy industry in relation to milk quality standards. This is evident in relation to chlorates, which requires changes to existing practices both at farm level and processing level in order to respond to market demands. The transition to Selective Dry Cow Therapy is also a key issue for the entire industry to grasp, as new EU Veterinary Medicines Legislation will prohibit the preventative

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

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DAIRY INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

use of antibiotics by 2022. The transition will require careful management including the need to scale up the level of milk recording across the national herd. In the immediate future, the market outlook will be dictatedbyBrexitandinternationaltradedevelopments. Ultimately, it is very difficult to look beyond the 29th of March 2019 with the UK Government, Parliament and general public heavily divided on the best way forward. While preparations for a no-deal are intensifying at industry, government and EU level, there is no doubt that the avoidance of a no-deal is critically important.

There are signs that global milk supply is moderating. The lagged impact of EU drought over winter, US supplies and New Zealand output for the remainder of their season will be key looking forward into 2019. Intervention stocks are expected to clear by mid- 2019, which will help boost market sentiment. Global demand is still growing but it also has slowed down by uncertainty caused by trade wars and Brexit, weaker economic outlook in China and the eurozone and falling oil prices.

Eamonn Farrell is an agri-food policy executive at the Irish Co-operative Organisation Society ICOS) and is the secretary of Milk Quality Ireland (formerly known as IMQCS). ICOS is the umbrella body for the co-operative movement in Ireland. ICOS represents a range of co-operative enterprises, operating acrossmany aspects of the rural economy including dairy processing andmilk purchasing societies, livestock marts, breed societies, animal health and AI, horticulture, forestry, financial services and other rural based societies.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

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CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH Has your milking machine had a ‘spring clean’?

[Click here] for previously published tips

T he milking parlour is where income on a dairy farm is generated, through the harvesting of milk in a safe, clean and efficient manner. Milking machines spend many hours connected to the most valuable part of your farm - your cows. So making sure they are serviced regularly is essential to ensure that they don’t contribute to mastitis in your herd, and have a negative impact on your potential income.

TIP

AT THIS TIME OF YEAR

• Book in your service before spring time with a registered IMQCS technician. A list of these in your local area is available on http://www.milkquality.ie/TechnicianRegister.html. • Get the service technician to go through the report fully with you – it is important to have an understanding of how the machine is functioning, and why certain recommendations may have been made. • Carry out any repairs needed immediately. • Start the season with a new set of liners, and change them after 2000 milkings or 6 months, whichever comes first. • Keep machines in top condition test and service every six months. Don’t forget about the teat sprayers! Check that these are working fully and replace any nozzles that are blocked or faulty.

TIP

AT EVERY MILKING

Carry out checks to make sure you have a fully functioning machine. Daily, weekly and monthly checks will help as an early warning system of any faults. See our CellCheck video to see what these simple recommended checks are.

More information is available online www.cellcheck.ie and in the CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

RESEARCH UPDATE Vet Clin Food Anim 28 (2012) 307–320 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cvfa.2012.03.004 0749-0720/12/$ – see front matter © 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc.

The Role of the Milking Machine in Mastitis Control Graeme A. Mein, BAgrSc, MAgrSc, PhD

20 K Road, Werribee South, Victoria 3030, Australia E-mail address: mein@netspace.net.au

KEY POINTS Most new infections (NIs) are caused by factors other than the milking machine. • Direct and indirect milking machine effects may account for up to 20% of NIs in some herds and, perhaps, only about 10% in an ‘average’ herd nowadays—provided the machine settings are right. • Mastitis risk is reduced by keeping bacterial numbers low on or near the teat-ends, especially if machine settings and/or milking management practices are less than ideal. • Machine or management conditions that lead to a sudden, transient inrush of air through a teatcup will increase the risk of NIs. The main risk factors are liner slips, rough cluster removal, or clusters kicked off, especially at or near the end of milking. • Vacuum fluctuations in the milkline or receiver are too slow to increase the NI rate unless they increase the frequency of liner slips or cluster falling. • New research during the past 20 years has shown there is no need to leave clusters on cows in an attempt to empty the udder completely at every milking. • Healthy teat-ends are critical to the maintenance of low numbers of infected quarters. • NI rates are reduced by pulsation characteristics which provide effective teat massage.

Key words: Machine milking, New infection rate (NIR), New infections (NIs), Teatcup action

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

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Tom Starr 087 6697010

Mícheal Guinan 086 3511852 micheal.guinan@aurivo.ie Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

tstarr@arrabawn.ie Tipperary/Limerick National Co-op

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567

John Murphy 066 7163200 john.murphy@kerry.ie Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

fitzpatrickj@glanbia.ie Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

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Sinead Treanor streanor@carbery.com 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 aoneill@tipperary-coop.ie Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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Tom Downes 087 2564669

Denis Guiry 086 8098639 dguiry@dairygold.ie Cork/Tipperary/Limerick Dairygold

downest@lakeland.ie Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 BrDillon@glanbia.ie

Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | January Edition 2019

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