1913

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]Iolumr II

~ltblinlr.h blJ W41' ~l'ttinr QIlu!I!I IDqr iluffalo Normal ~rqool illutfalil. N. ,.

DANIEL UPTON, B,S" :NLE., Pd.D. Principal

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lfAVSAURR.-JONllS I'RINTlN'Q CO){PIlNV :aLJI'VALO,N,y.

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wo tI)p Itrw ilutralo Normal ~.drool tl)l' ~rttio .. C!l[UlIli of Niltrtml i!iult~ ..rb ultb wl)it'tult wallt gratrfully alt~ rrllprrtfully brbiratl' tl)ill lITarumr

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TSoarb of 1.Ebttorn

RUSSELL N . KEPPEl, Editor-in-Chief JOH ); A. L IVI NGSTOl\ Business Ll!l anager

GERTRUDE S TOESSER Assistant Editor JAMES L. SHEA Assistant Business Manager

YlICHAEL J. MAHER Advertising Manager

ELS I E J OHNSON Literary Editor

AMANDA ENGLUND Art Editor

JAMES FARRE LL News Editor MILDRED SISSON Humor Editor ROSEMARY B ILL Society Editor HELEN }VALKER K indeigarten JOIIN MCCARTHY Vocational EVELYN RUSSELL Secretary, Treasurer MAB EL 1. D E>fZEL JOSEPH BALK

I

At kttnlulr~9mrttt!i T HE Board of Editors a~knowledge with thanks the kmdly assIstance of Nlr. Upton, Mr. Maycock, Miss Bacon, Miss Kempke, ~Vriss Viele and Miss Small in the preparation of this Volume,

n r Ut n r T HIS publication is issued to express, out– wardly, a record of our school life (the best days we shall ever live) and to pre– serve the memory and name of Ninetecn– Thirteen with its life, work and customs,

~oarb of ilauagrrs

HON , GEORGE A, DAVIS

HON. EDWARD H. BUTLER . President

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Ho", HENRY W, HILL SecretaTY and Treasure1" MR, ROBERT 1. rRYER HON. GEORGE A. DAVIS YIR. HOJH RT Vol EED lVIR. A. CONGER GOODYEAR

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I\1R,RALPH \~T , POMEROY

HON. EDWARD H. BUTLER President

f\/IR. HOBART \\TEED

11

1J1arulty

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GERTRUDE NI. B ,\CON P rinciples of Education, Supervisor of Teaching

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3'J1atulty DANIEL UPTON, B.S., M .E., PJ.D. Principal

Nnnmtl liIrpartntcnt /

/GRACE VIELE, B.L. / Hislor y , .Lib/'aria~ V AUCE W ESSA, B.S. History of Education; Geog"aphy V' LILLIAN' LANE, Ph.B. School Economy, English l AMELlA B. SPR,\GU£ Drawing V ELIZABETH BI SHOP Science ~JAN E E. K EELER M ethodJ in Reading .; CORA M. SAGER ill! usic ELIZABETH C. LANGE Principal, Depart-ment Household Art5 G EO RG l ~A E. CHAMOT /vI a.nual Traini1tg, Seu'ing

:VIARK \1. :\IAYCOCK, ?-.I.P. Drawing, Penmanship :VfARCliS A. G. ")"'IEADs, B.S. AI atlumatic5 , Logic HARRlSO;-; C. G I VENS, i\J.E. f/ ocationaL Education

ORRE" L. PEASE, B.S. Science, Nature Study

GERTRUDE ·~d . B Aco1\" Principles of Education, Supe1'vi.wr of Teaching SUSAN F. CHASE, B.L., j\·LA" Ph.D. P s)'clwlogy KEMl~Kt:, Ph.B. English V HELEN G. E KC LEBRECK, A.B. Records, His/o'ry Methods, School Ewno– my

LOUISE 1\1. CASSETY Princi pa.l, Kindergarten Depart~nent

BESSIE HOU.IA~) B.S. H ous(hold A,·ts

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~rllunl uf JIrar_tiCf

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BENSO~, Ass't Principal V

l'vL-\RT01'\ 1.. SUMMEY

CARRIE

Crit.ic Teacher, Nint~, Grade

Critic Teacher, FOlt'rth Grade E LLA SI. S~HTH Critic Teacher, Third Grade . THERESA A. ROEllSLER C1'itic Teacher, Second Grade

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?vLu.Y H. FO\-\fLER Crit;c Tea"her, Eighth Grade J AK~IE E. DAVIES . C1'itic Teacha, Seve1tth Grade '!Ii LiLLIAN \V. "VAL K ER J eritic Teacher, Sixth Grade ELIZA~E'fH BIRD SMALL Cn:t'ic 'teacher, Fifth Grad'?

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ERN 1NA S. SM ITH

Critic Teachu, FiT5t Grade K indagarte-n A ssist.ant

LYDIA A. CHAMOT Teacher oj German

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2

H O\\' picturesque is our old No rmal School these radiant spring Jays! The soft green of the young leaves alread y partly conceals the lofty brick walls. . L nique, indeed, is its Italian style with Mansard rqo{, in these days of rigid util itarianism; it speaks of the more romantic past, "v~ich is one of the reasons why its days arc numbered. In o ther words the present structure no longer meets the demand s of modern life ; and twentieth-century enterp rise will permit neithe r waste nor useless ness ; nor yet does it dep reciate beauty. Bu t it does insist that architecture as mere archi tecture will not suffice. Light, convenience, ventilation and sanitation a re no longer considered luxuries, but the veriest necessities of right living. The imminent doom of the old pile is bei ng ·sounded in the rear by boastful steam-shovels and riveting-hammers. The rival structure is al ready well under way, and impatiently bides the lime when it will have obli te·ra ted its victim en- tirdy. Difficult i5 it to picture the new build ing-in the chaos of cement, ca sing a nd mach inery-the memori al fountain flashing among the debris. Only as graduates will our highest hopes be fuWlled, and our eyes behold the completed build ing. Scores of Alumni will learn with regret the demoli tion of the old building. But, 0 Alumni and fellow-graduates, let us call the new school our own! Let us be loyal to her, our Alma NIater, ever triumphant in her success, ever defendant of her honor. j: One thing remains to us- ou r much-loved el ms. Though the old building is no more) these will yet endure, a lasting memorial and a fitting namesake we be– queath to the new school of the fu ture. ELSIE JOH NSON

lJu falrmoftum

ANDREW S. DRAPER

HELEN L. DUNSTON IRVING P. BISHOP

"Great souls are portions of eternity"

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President F. ice-President

RUSSELL N. KEPPEL GERTRUD E STOESS ER JOH:-.1 ~'I cCAnTHY ROSEtl.IARY BILL. . AGNES R EI""ANN ~L-\RY CHABOT l\fARTE GEOG I-IEGiN ALlCE :\IcICIY LEVI lvf 11\ER

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Secretary Treasurer

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f/ aledictoricw M anile 01'0101' Historian Proph,t Presentation of Gift

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I Non Sc/zo/ae, Sed Vitae :\10'1''1'0

Daisy F l.-OWER

Gold and Whi te COLORS

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ABBOTT, VIOLA D. ANDREWS, STELLA A. BAKER, P AULlNE B.

DENZEL, Tv'I A BEL 1. D EVI NEY, G. I-I ERHERT DERRY, EDITH 1\1f. DYCER, CHARLEE DIXSON, EMILY \\T. DYMON, SYLVI A E . EASTLAND, CHRISTI);,E A. Elss, iVIILDRED E. ELLIOTT, N f AUD T. ENGLUND, AMANDA K . FARRELL, J AMES E.

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BAKER, :vI. EDN A BENDER, J EAN NETTE E.

BENEDICT, MURIEL

BILL, ROSEMARY BLEY; CE LIA NI. B LI VEN, S OPHIA 'yY.

BOWMAN, K ATHERINE G .

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BRADY, ANAST ATlA BROWN, H AZEL C. BURDEN, GERTRUDE H. BURKHARDT, E LIZABETH B URNS, Wl ARY F. CARBERRY, VINCENT A. CHABOT, MARY :VI. CLARK, ALlCE G. CLARK, I SABE L COLWELL, ~lARY E. CORCORAN, EVELY~ NT. CORNELL, N hLDRED L.

FELL, NLu:.GARET F ELT, COLLETTA IV£. FERNBACH, ROSE L.

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FI NGER, L YDIA FINK, ANASTASIA 1'v1. F ITZGERALD, ANNA 1\1r.

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F ISHER, F. S. FORSYTH, lVIARGARET C. F RASER, l\tl ARY :LvI. GEDEOEIN, OLIVE V. GEOGHEGAN, TVf ARTE A. GIsns, LEONA M. GILRAY, PHYLLI S A. GLAUBER, :1'IAR IE A. GREEKWOOD, CHARLOTTE A.

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COWLEY, FLOR ENCE

COX, GRACE T. COYLE, GERTRUDE H. CRA~E, LEILA B.

DAlI,IATTIO , ANKA

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HJ\MELMAX, \fARY T. HANDY, :\L<\y HANKAIIAN, I-fELEXi A :vI. HATHAWAY, GEORGIA E. HAYES, OLIVE F. IIENEt., CATHERI XE S. HILL, IvlARY C. 'HOWE, CORA E. HUCKER, K ATHERIN £ :\/1. HUFSl'ADER, :VL-\TIE L. HUNT, H. LEIGH HU~TE R , BEULAH .\II. IRLBACKER, ELEANOR E. ]OI-INSON, ELSIE E, JUDGE, JOSEPHINE 1\1L KEICIIER, ELLEN A. KEPPEL, R USSE LL K. KILCOYN E, KATHLEEN D. K LETT'l, ELOISE I. KLEIN, ]\:ORi\ A. K:"HCKENBERG, GERTRUDE KREHBIEL, 1\1.ATI£ A. LA RKI X, \fARGARET E. LEE, R UTH E. LIVI :'{GSTO ~l, J OHN A. i\ [CCARTHY, J OHN J. .MCCONNELL, HELEN P.

~lcLAUGHLJN, I 5.-\B£L :\1. l\tIAIIER, WfTCHAF.I. ]. WI AZUROWS KI, l\L-\RIE \1. lVllKULSKI, FLORENC E G. ~\lhLLER, GRACE E.

~dINER, LEVI H. lvI UR PHY, EUNICE

KE LLIST, FLORENC E \f. O'CONNOR, EVELYN R. O ' DONN ELL, l\L\ln E. V.

OTT, DELIA M. PARKER, INEZ S.

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\IcDoXXELL, ARTHUR].

ROSENAU, SHIRLEY ROSA, ELI ZAB ETH B. R YAN, COLLETTE f.

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SAGER, ALTA L. SCHAEFER, NORsfA R. SCI-I ELBACH, AL)"IA E. SHEA, JAMES L. SIEKMANK, LOt:lSE A. SISSON, rvII LDRED H. S IRDEVAN, T ERESA C. SLOPPEY, XE),11A D. B. SPeRBER! IDA C. STAFFORD, NIARIE C. SHEPHRRD, GERTRUDE SMITlI, ADAH

TA YLOR, ALICE C. TEFFT, L. LUELLA THOMPSON, FLORENCE E. TIIOMSO~, JEAN G.

'J'HUM, ESTHER ·~vI. TIFFANY, RUTH E. . TILLOU, AU.IA 1.

VALLELY, E D ITII VVALKER, HF.LEN G. Vv ARNE, J\tIrLDRED L. WA LLEN, ELEANOR E. \VETISTEH., GEORGE \VHITE, T-};\ZEL F.

STETSON, LAURA :vI. STOESSER, GERTRUDE B. \V, STRATMETR, IIELl::::\, A. STRUnT:-.lG, B ERTII !\ j\I. STRURTNG, ?dAIlELLE E.

\VICKHAlI.'l, HAZE l. ''-' ILKIE, F. EDITH

\VILSON, ELEANOR fvl. \VOELFLE, L AURA F. \V'OOD, IvL\RGUE RITE B. \VOODS, G LADYS L. \VORDEN, lVL-\YME A.

SULLIVA:-':, J OSEPH

Su:srNF.RS, EDN ;\ i\ I.

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QIalrubar. 1 912

No rmal Department opening

QInmmtttrrli

SEPTE~IBER I I

12 ReceptLon by Faculty a~d Seniol'f'i to the new" students

OCTOBER

Tri Sigma Jance

NOVEMBER 22

Thanksgiving holidays

NOVEldB ER 24-25

6 Athletic Association dance

DECEMBER

§rnillf (lliang l.~mplinl1

.Arethusa dance Household Arts Club Candy Sale Christmas entertainmcnt by School of Practice Beginning of Christmas recess

DECEMBER 13 DECE:~·,.lBER 18 DECEMBER 20 DEem,mER .20

RUSSELL ?\. KE1'I'EL, Chairman

LUELLA TEFFT

AXASTATIA BRADY

JOHN A. LIV[~GSTON

ROSE;"'IARY BILL

QIaltubar. 1 913

(lliaug 1Jn9igniu

N. KEPPEL, Cha-irman

RUSSELL

JAMES L. SHEA JOSEPH BALK

GERTRUDE STOESSER

School work resumed Reception given by June, 1913, Class to January, 1913, Class Clionian dance Reading by l\'-11'. Henry Lm,vrence South ....yick Term examinations begin Reception given by Faculty to January) 1913 , Class Second Semester begins Psychology party Easter vacation Arethusa dance Clionian dance Concert given by Kormal Chorus In ter-sorori ty dance Lecture by )"Jr. Lorado Taft Alumni reception and tea for the Senior Class ,. Annual conference of dra~'ing teachcrs of \Vcstcrn New' York First number of the Record issued Athletic Associa tion dance Peace Day exercises E. II. Butler Oratorical Contest Spring dances .Reception by Faculty to J unc, 1913, Class Baccalaureate Sunda~.-" Class Day

6

J ANUA RY

J. i\/IAHE R

l\'IICHAEL

8

JANUARY

10

J ANUARY

(lliann (j\ift ] OSEPH BALK, Chairman

17 29 3 '

J ANUARY JA~UARY

J ANUARY

J. :\IIcDoNNELL

GERTRUDE STOESSER

ARTH UR

FEBRUARY 4 FEBRUARY 20 N IARCll 20- 3 1 APRIL 4 APRIL J J A PRIL 17 A PRIL 18 APRIL 21 A PRIL 23 APRIL 26 lvIAY 16 f\/IAY 16 MAY 16 MAY 29 JUNE 3 JUNE 20 J UNE 22 JUNE 23 JUN E 24 J UNE 25

JOHN illcC.'RTHY

LUELLA TJ:::FFT

?\,[,\RCUERITE B. WOOD, Chairman

G. LEIGH H UNT

CORNELIA ROACH

(!!1IU1utpmrnwul lExmiM9 RUSSELL N. KEPPEL, Chairman

Decorations :~VL\RJE STAFFORD

A1W01l1tCements

LUELLA TEFFT

ilfus"ic

Caps and Gowns ~hLDRED -CORNELL

SOPHIA BLIVEN

:lII9~H G. HERBERT DE rJ:-1EY

Commencement Alumni Reunion

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F ACULTY, Students and Friends: The· Class 0/1913 greets you and extenell a most cordial welcome to this, its own great day. Before another day has passed we shall have. joined the ranks of the many who have already gone out from this school. \tVithin another day we ,ha disband, to enter upon that greater field of life which lies Outstretched before u \Ve must cut ourselves loose from this dear old school, content that we are standin on the threshold of- a new era, as it were, reviewing the radiant his tory of this gran old pioneer of education and foreseeing the splendid prospects of the new school The many pleasant friendships that we have made here, the. privileges we have enjoyed and the associations we have nurtured, never shall be forgotten, but they shall be firmly retained in our memories, to furnish us food fo r future reflection For t\vo years we have been under the guidance of experienced teachers, and are nuw prepared to entcr one of the noblest professions; which last yearwasgreatJy exalted when the country elected one of our number to the Presidency,and theror– mer Chief Executive became a professor at Yale University. Little does the anrage mind realize the important responsibilities of our calling. Little docs it analru the duties of tne teacher, beyond asking qU"estions and giving out work. tpon u, will be laid the task of impressing directly upon the minds of future American citizens those truths that develop the highest manhood; of implanting in each brain and each heart the germs of knowledge, whose perfect growth shall form lives of success and \vhose fruitage shall be the crowning of well-spent lives. Emerson said,"The true test of civilization is not in the census, nor in the size of the cities, nor in the crops, but in the kind of men the country turns out." :As we go out into our various fields we shall find that nature does not distrib-– ute her gifts equally. The good and the bad alike are cast out from her t oun _ tain . In our "vork with children we shall find some who need the bracing .umos– ph ere and attention of our open-air schools, to develop their bodies before their minds can be trained, and also some who are mentally deficient and who need special individual attention. Our training has prepared us to meet these problems. Each genc(ation stands in a ne\v position, it derives new views of past faults and failures with new glimpses of fu ture possibilities; and, silently, old errors are dropped and ne"'l wisdom adopted . There are other types of schools which ha ve been 'estab lished to meet the needs of progress. One of these which has been evolved from experience and has received the stamp of approval is the vocati'o~al school. This has 'become a necessity in view of the fact ~hat "a very small percentage of children being graduated from the grammar schools enter high schooL These boys and girls are being pushed out into the world poorly equipped for their lifework. It is in the vocational sch~ls that they may be trained for a more efficient life. Here the pupils not only recel\'e an academic training but also an excellent foundation -for future vocation. All these conditions the teacher of today must be prepared to meet. How well we shall discharge these responsibilities remains for the future to decide.

. RUSSELL N. KEPPEL, President

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Du ring the past year death has taken from us two teachers, j\·Iiss H elell L. Dunston and "VTr. I rvi ng p, Bishop. T heir strong personal ities l;v ill iong be remem– bered by the many stu dents wl~ose lives ha ve been enriched by their teachings. J n the death of Andrew S. D raper, State Commiss ioner of Education, whose long and useful life was devoted to the betterment of schools in Xe',\' York State, the educatio nal ,,"orld has lost one of its sin cerest friends. Tonight "ve pass out from tl:is school; no longer to be under the influ ence of ou r teachers o r the supervision of our Principa l. vVe acknowledge the debt of g ratitude we mve t hem, especially O U f Princ ipal, Dr. LTpton, whose untiring efforts have raised the standard of scholarship and efficiency of the Buffalo Normal School. Tonight v,."e shall lay as ide our cloak of responsibi lities an d enter into the spirit of the exercises to \~thich we bid you a most hearty welcome.

OlInss ®ffirrrs

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OlInss ~nU9

Tune-" The Orange and the Black" (P rint.:eton)

1"\ow the time has come for pa rting And wc· must say ad ieu '1'0 our dea rl y beloved Normal And the friends we hold so t rue; Still we'll ban ish care and sadness, As we join in songs o f praise, And sing of dear old Norma l And t hose dear old happy days, For where'cr our paths may lead us I n the wo rld that lures so b right, H er beacon light e'er gleami ng Sha ll gu ide us in t he right; \Yh ile as yea r by year rolls onward, \Ve ~)t ill re turn to praise And sing to dear o ld T\ormal And t hose dear o ld happy days . Then fare"ve ll, dear Buffalo Kormal, Though we must leave thy care, \,ve'll always love and cherish Our Alma iV[ate r fair, And in memory we'll look backward, As we joi n in a song of pra ise And sing of dea r old Normal And lhose dea r old happy d ays.

GERTRUDE STOESSER f/ ice-P1·esident

J 0 11 :-: i\IIc C J\RTH Y Secretary

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ROSEM A RY BILL TuaJurer

H E LENA A. REU TER

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with the victims, how refresh ing it was to spend a few vacant periods out on the campus! Our Freshman year passed all too soon, and another September found us fully impressed with our own importance. \Ve were ready to assume responsibilities, even hardships, in order to make the most of our one remaining yea r. The time come to prove our worth. I t was with fear and trembling we began our stringent duties as practice teachers. After a short Christmas vacation, it was announced one day that t he Seniors would hold a Tv.'elfth Night Revelry. "\Vhat is it going to be?" was the ques– tion on everybodis lips. On the ninth of January, at three o'clock, nearly all the members of the class, induding a few who were not members, assembled in the Chapel. The entertainment turned out to be a mimicry of Shakespearian life, under the direction of the Queen of Revels, rvlary Corridon of the January class . One of the features of the afternoon was the making up of two trains, one from ourselves and one from our Faculty. The speed of the latter made us feel we were still among the pedestrians of Elizabeth times. The members of the January class and the Faculty received amusingly appropriate gifts . This feature added greatly to the enjoyment of the afternoon . As a daily reminder of our triumph at Albany '.vc have in our possession -the selfsame pen with which the bill fo r the appropriation was signed. It seemed fitting that the pcn ,hould be presented by Assemblyman Edward D. Jackson. It was good, that morning, to see the man who had done so much for us; better still was it to hear his stirring address . Although I912 boasted of being the first class to publish an Annual, I913 sent out The Recm·d. It was in the spring of our Senior year that we made our first bow to the literary world . \Ve confess that we have not, through the first issue, leaped into fame at a single bound. vVe only sincerely hope that The Record will become one of the leading publications of its kind in the State. Another noteworthy feature of our Senior year was the oratorical contest, instituted by the Hon. Edward H. Butler , President of the Board of Trustees. The fact that 1913 bore away two of the prizes proves that the art of oratory 1S not among the leas t of its gifts . 'fhe brightness of our Senior year has been dimmed by the death of two mem~ bers of the Faculty, )Aiss Helen L. Dunston and 1\1r. Irving P. Bishop. These deaths came as a great shock to the school; while the loss is felt by both students and teachers. The lives of these two worthy teachers exemplified those sterling quali– ties of devotion to duty, and heroism In the fact of trials that seemed at times insurmountable. Surely, they have left us examples ,"vorthy of imitation. Before Vire make our final bow we wish to express our appreciation of our Faculty. It has been their one concern to develop our every potentiality. Has the

(!Ilann i;tntnry F OR some strange and unwarranted reason, in my early youth I thought the ...vriting of history a mere matter of tabulating events in chroo?logical order; but I have come to realize that to properly record the many inter– esting events of the Class of 1913 requires the service of one who is not a mere chronicler, but of one ·who possesses the insight of a philosopher. . In September, 191 I) with timid step we entered the Buffalo Normal School. As a class we came full of ardent hope and high resolves. It was our ambition to gain the top of the ladder of learning in a short time,vVc soon learned) however, that this \vas not an easy- task; that it required much hard work, attended, often– times, with discouragements. Of intellectual hoboes we boastof none; but of earnest workers devoted to a cause there are 160. Owing to the fact that the course in the Household Arts Department has been lengthened, 1913 regrets -the loss of its cooks. This loss has been offset, however, by the addition for the first time of graduates of our night school. On the ",.:hole, the class represents a group of young men and women with versatile powers who have endeavored to accomplish their tasks with fearless energy. Our first year was naturally a quiet one, since we were only Freshmen, and too busy studying to waste much time in frivolit ies. \Vhen the Faculty and the Seniors invited us to a reception, soon after our entrance, we were all very \villing to lay aside our books for the afternoon. V\le- were so royally and hospitably enter– tained that when tl:e time came for our departure, we felt \ve were no longer strangers. 'Though we were but Freshmen, we enjoyed the privilege of taking part in the dramatics, and it was with no little pride that we claimed a large measure of success for our production of "The Rose of Plymouth Town." Again, during our Senior year, with the assistance of a few Freshmen, \ve presented "Demeter" for the Thanksgiving program. The roles for this classic play were ably portrayed, particularly that of Hermes, by our friend "Jack." All present -were ready to confess his wand had cast a spell, and that all were back in Ancient Greece. Among the proofs testifying to our success on these occasions ,"verc "crowded auditorium," "standing room only," and "scores of people turned a\vay," etc. How well we remember that first Nlonday in June during our Freshman year -Faculty Calamity Day--\vLen the list of accidents recorded for tl:e day included a lacerated scalp, a broken n9se, the pink-eye, blue lungs, and (would you believe it?) a heart pierced by the never-failing arrow of Cupid. Though we sympathized

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sacrifice of time and strength been spent in vain? Future years will tell. but proffer our warmest appreciation of their endeavors in Our behalf. Tonight closes our life at Normal. OUf nvo years have been rich :with of varied experiences. \Ve are now ready for the new and untried pnobllen•• real life. Our class history is but begun . We have accomplished a few That we may accomplish more and greater things is the hope of the The story of these efforts, whether they bring success or real, the vital history of the Class of 19 13. IDqr 'mtlm nf tqr Nntrbnnk

fluutlr ®ratinn

sweet secrets and a peep behind its

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I

Tell me not Ln joyful cadence Notebooks are the st udents' dream, They the upward roads to kno!viedge, Stony paths to us they seem. IVIidnight oil is oft kept burning 'Vhen fond families are asleep, And in dusky attic corners Rats and mice begin to creep. Still t he pen keeps scratching, scratching, As the notebook leaves oft turn, ';'h-iting JO'wn the mystic symbols vVhich we can' t, but ought to, learn. Strikes the witching hour of midnight, And with sigh and nod of head Though -the notes are uncompleted Yet we hie us to our bed . Ranks of teachers file before liS, Clutching ruthless crayons blue, \Vho shall trace in fiendish pleasure Hopeless 3 or - 2" Nlaidens wrestling with their shirt-waists, Laboratory scratch and burn, Puzzling o'er the Babcock Tester And how many times to turn. How to tell the veal from mutton, Is it lamb or is it pig? Lusty efforts to be graceful In that lilting Irish jig. Dawn at last- alarm clocks tinkle, "Sleep that knits t he sleeve of care" Swift departs and leaves us tired-cr* Tossing, turning, sleep eludes liS, Visions flit before our minds~ Irish stew and picric acid, Crochet stitches of all kinds. Than when first we laid us there, Dreams are to the poets, fancies, You th 's delight! solace of cares, But to us who keep six notebooks Dreams are naught else but nightmares,

Lea''', t lose

y you harken! Our stately mIen, our zea _ Ives we pra 1 _ . de at all times our enthusiasm over Chubb

bdraw QUl se

'.

I larl y a~ tl tu.,

el, sC 10 tc lips during chapel and study penods, "'OUI 'h bb) o ur rnu . (U , Homer-we would have you emulate; for you ...cil.Ij(J.n of t he grea t

. . Senior fricnds, you ask? "\\hatls a , . k II h at 'tis ah 'tiS a tas . To te w , . I b ·- ming full of ancIent ore, A person 11m I n s so brief, yea, by the score, Of lesson P a "OTis one who cali. point out to you should and should not do. The way you . ':\Ios t anything with anythmg- " " how to write or how to sing. , es, eve n

U Deductive reasoning, ye,s, jn~uctive, too,

,

P '1' westerlies a Parhamentary stew, revalmg , I k ' ,. h can teach them all, for, 1ar . J CS, S C I '" Has she not earned a 100 mar (.

d "I . more and more important ! Yc expectant Sopho- I " I b b Freshmen! How we all sh.llmiss you-but, ah, e sweet ltt cay I ' b n the midnight oil, laboriously writing up your note- u. 'or as you ur . . d '1 I 'ating them with a few pictures and cbppmgs, think urs an ga l Y (eeOI d I for f ourscore weeks . But do take heart, oh weary a\e one t le same h ff .rde d by that most coveted honor-an exemp- uc earnest e ort rew babes and others then take heed!! d I I', We regretfully pass that absorbing privilege to ,....'.11, ear esson pans. \\"h aged in this work strive ever to be ., clear and en you are eng 1 UaDIO'S: al y growIng

*Poetic license

- HELEN J ARVIS

3-1

35

are proud of it. But \vby, may I ask, do you ahvays seek such haunts as Silver Springs in which to play; where you must walk the ties for miles and miles, and then some more miles, just because the prospects of success crowded out the train schedule? Footsore and hungry, your courage truly matched that of soldiers on the battlefield. Listen to our advice, however, so that you may warn your succes – sors to take with them hampers of da :nties when on a tour. 'I'ell them, too , lest they should not know, that if by some chance their funds do run lmv it will be wiser to send the players home, one by one, to lighten the expenses of the valiant team. 'Two great events have marked this school- year. One of these was the occasion when we proudly donned the long, flowing toga and strove to rival the eloquence of Cicero and Patrick Henry. Now, Junio;'s, we leave you the platform. You will truly have to persevere to uphold the high standard our youthful orator.:; have set for you. This year, too, has marked the beginning of the edition of our paper, the Record. Our staff of editors has shown those of corning years what it means to give to the students of Normal the best and the wittiest. As you glance at the magazine you will wonder at the _galaxy of youthful writers who remind you of Dante, Shakespeare, Scott, Poe and Mark Twain. Fair Alma :\ilater! vVe now say a regretful farewell. Your ideals have always been the noblest and purest. Far and wide your standards of goodfellowship and helpfulness have been spread. In coming years we shall be the better and stronger for having been with you . IVIay the same sweet spirit of Alma TvIater manifest itself 'Nhen the noble halls of the new building are completed . Dear Juniors, we must say goodbye to the days of goodfellowship we have passed together. You have always been ready to help us and co-operate with us. \Ve shall long remember your kindnesses. Now we surrender this gavel to you. Take the honors and privileges which it represents, a'nd see that when you in turn pass it over to others it may shine with even a brighter luster than it does for the Class of 1913.

"To write a lesson plan, you know, Yea, you must do it, this way, so; For~ab:! the suft, resplendent Jlloon, Step right inside and hurry to your room; Forget the stroll you might have had And write a plan-the Normal fad. "Take ten or more plan sheets so white, And ink, both red and blue; for now your night Of joy, of untold bliss begins for ye, For at that plan all night ye'll be. Now write, and write some more, And,' member, not repeat what's e'er been said before. 11

Friends, there comes into e-ach of our lives a time when \ve look forward to a great moment. From the imtant our eyes open to the dawn, with \vhat feeling of expectancy do we wait for that moment at 1:40. Oh, what joy to be a "G" at these critic meetings! Ah, Juniors, soon you'll knowl Future practice teachers! As you now look so admiringly at the important Seniors, we gaze into your sweet, untroubled faces and silently wonder if you can ever lay aside light-heartedness and frivolity, and acquire that self-control and responsibility you "vill find necessary when, quietly but quickly, you lead out a lively little class to the merry peal of our sweet-toned firebell. Vv'e know, of course, future teachers, that you will have a tender feeling for the map-room, a sweet consideration for the charts and a mute affection for that mystic little box. Would you could speak, oh, knowing one, and roll out your secrets! \TIle know, too, Juniors, that you will vie with one another in tripping gaily down to the primary case, to ge t that which makes your lesson "concrete." Perhaps a load of hay it is, a copper mine, an art gallery, a cotton plantation– but ever something "concrete." At last we have learned it-the secret of the charm which brings the stronger members of our class down to that little room in the basement, from which for many a day we have heard the sound of hammer and saw. Listen, now, but do not breathe a word, for I heard it told in strictest confidence. They who make our class meetings so peaceful, so harmonious- they who hie to their workshop so eagerly, must each, these knights of hammer and saw, fashion a cedar chest before receiving the sheepskin . Girls, you know why a cedar chest ? It is whispered abroad that Dan Cupid controls this task. Let me warn you, noble knights, not to fashion your cedar chests as you did those chairs. To them, however, must we gratefully give the lau rels of battle! Besides furniture, they have carved a glorious name for themselves. Victory after victory has been theirs on the royal field of basketball. The team is a worthy one, and we

IVL\lty NL CHABOT

}! iGuUaby

Hush-a-bye, hush-a-bye, child of the sea, Soft billows are making a cradle for thee; \Vhile the wind and the waves as they softly sigh Are singing for thee a sweet lullaby. We shall follow the glimmering pathway so bright, Of silver and gold and soft, misty white, Till we come to the beautiful land of dreams, All agleam with the light of the moon's fairy beams.

-HELENA REUTER

37

36

MISS EVELYN RUSSELL MisS Evelyn Russell, who !{I in oharge of the &!Innal party of the Buffa.lo Alumnae OIiapter of the Sigma I Sorority, to be held in the ballroom of the new Town I Delaware Ave., on Saturda.y aftl/rnoon.-Photo

a.__. \

Ivlarie :Nlazurowski. The first sop ranos headed the procession, marching in double file- Lydia Finger and Marie Stafford, Kathleen Kilcoyne and Mary O'Donnell, Helen Reuter and Edith Reilein. Then, the ,econds-Georgia Hathaway and Katherine Henel, Cora Howe and Edna Summers, E,ther Thurn and Mildred Warne. In the group of first altos were Edith Derry and Mildred Cornell, Florence Shaw and Bertha Rood, Xenia Sloppey and Tere$a Sirdevan. Behind these came Adelaide Sampson and Cornelia Roach, Eunice Murphy and Ruth Lee, Florence Ne llist and Evelyn O'Connor, second altos. In the rear, a few paces dis tant, walked the music custodians, Nlargaret Larkin, Eleanor \\Iilson and l'vlary Burns. At the very end, beating a drum, to keep ste - not to kee time-marched ohn McCarth Every time a groufJlaile In t IS It was sent back-not to the study room, as we 'were once, but it was required to try again. " \¥ hen we came ncar the New Normal we caught the fami lia r stra in, 'rvry Country, 'Tis of Thee.' End of chapel, I thought. We sailed near the window of the Logic Room and.were just in time to hear f\.1ary Perfield, Mr. Mead's assist– ant, ask ft>r ahypothethical syllog ism . The reply was the dear old one,{' If he comes, lJrilLgoJ ~/ e saw Jeannette Bender, Grace lVIllier and Ruth Lee tca'c?l:llng a group of "frcshles'Jthe essentials of Pantomime, and l\tl attie Krehbiel and l\IIu riel Benedict showing the psychological difference between extension and intension. :=- --- "In the after noon we we re invited to an entertainment for t he benefit of a public school · paper, unde r the direction of Princi al ohn Livi and his Faculty, Ma ry Chabot, Mabel Denzel, May Han y, Phyllis G ilray, Olive Hayes, Ivlatie I-Iufstader. Amanda 'Englund, the seventh grade teacher, supervised the victrola. James Farrell of the eighth grade gave a steriopticon lecture on 'The Life History or the ~I{osquito . ' ,\lhile Jimmie was sea rching for his memoranda on this subject he d rew from his pocket his old attendance card, on which two absences from Literature class were still unchecked. On the way to the entertain– ment we saw Hazel Wickham walking along with a massive volume under he r arm, enti tled 'How to Ivlanage a Farm,' by Fitzgerald, Rosenau & Fitzgerald. She told me she was sorry she hadn't gone back to Normal for the Household Arts Course, as In ~z Parktr and Isabel McLaughlin had done. H Returning, we stopped off at the Rega n & Regan Photograph Company, at the Alma Shelbach Botanical Gardens -anaa tllie new vocatIonal-Mr. Balk, Principal-\vhere alf t hings are given thirty days fo r completjon . It proved a very enjoyable day. ' ELIZAB ETH BURKHARDT" I prophesied every bit of t hat! (Door bell rings and Prophetrection this telegram) "Coming at !O P. M ., the Red Cross Guild-the Shepherd, two Bakers, a .T~e, a Smith, a 'I'aylor, A Hunter, a Nliner and a Bowman. Refreshments, mint julep". ~ -- (Looks at postcard and reads) "Lei la Grane and Catherine Hucker have arranged anothe r translation of Dante's 'Divine Comedy '; and an 'Ode to the National Epics' is being written by Eloise IGeitz and Teresa Hamelma n. ..---/ '---'- ELEAN"OR IRLBACHER" -------- (Takes a card, read/v ~ 'Time has passed, and Ray and I .

(tHann Jrnpqrry

JUNE, 1913

(At the teiephone) - 1-5-9-5-I. Yes, please. The Reimann Publishing House? May I speak with the Editor-in-Chief, please? Agnes? This is Alice. Oh, I'm so discouraged. Just think, ten years ago I prophesied for the June class of 1913, and so far only a few things have come true. What? Two girls teaching at Lacka– wanna? (Aside) I knew it ! Gertrude Bar.b..a.r..a.Wilh.cl.mina Stoesser, drawing teacher ; objects for the term, Uneeda BIscuit boxes, onions and horsechestnut twigs. Louise Siejgru!n, supervisor of sandtables in the primary grades. (At the telephone) Ju st yesterday I met the Proprietor of the Buffalo Evening News, Russell..XeppeJ. He thrust an ' (Extra " into my hand, and when I looked at the headlines I read, "Dar– ing aeronauts plan a trip to the moon in their automo-aeroplane, christened 'The E astland Ferry.' Party of four, Herbert De Viru:y, Raymond Fisclli:r, James Shea and Arthur !vlcDonnell. " Yes, and do you know that Michael Ivra he r is among the Progressives and is the lead ing spirit of the movement for the Recall of Faculty Decisions? It's true!- and what do you think? Alice Rieman, Mary Hill and Leigh Hunt have left for Greece, with pickaxes and shovels, to dig for the goblets used by the suitors of Penelope in the banquet hall at Ithaca. 1 knew it! Yes, and do vou know the name of the new Poet Laureate? Elsie Johnson (Door bell rings). Th~re goes the door bell-goodbye. ~ (At the door) Robert Strunk, the mailman! (Receives two letters and four cards. Looks at top card) adm1'ringly) Ah, a picture of the "Farm "- from her who used to be Charlotte Gr~od. (Takes up another card and reads): Dear l'rophet:-Mary Fraser, Alta Sager, Margaret Fell, Maud Elliot, Sylvia Dymond, Hazel Brown, Anna Damotto, E lla Rehburg, Coletta Felt, Mar– garet Forsyth, Nlarie Glauber, Elizabeth Rosa and I have joined the suffragists. Spread the news. SO PHIA l!LIV EN, Spieler" (Takes package andopens)~ \Vell! "The Value of Supplementary Reading," dedic ated to rvIiss Kempke, written by Eve.lyn Russell and Stella Andrews for the benefit of futu re Normal I students. (Takes a Letter and reads): Door bell ringJ) The parcel's po,t airship! " THE CLAR K J\ND CLARK HOTEL, New York City

-

(

"THE NEW PECK HOME, Shenchowfu , China

No doubt it will interest you to know that you prophesied exactly and that the foll owing girls have accepted positions here: Grace Cox, Music; Viola Abbot, Kindergarten; Edith Vallely, Anthropology and Metaphysics; Gertrud e Burden, Folkdance-ology.

Now own the house we thought we'd buy. I should worry?-not a bit, You were right; I'm glad of it. _

CHARLEE DYCER,

Their Chief Cook"

(

(Other letter) Ah! from Buffalo.

The verse I learned to write at Normal comes in handy. ELLA RAFFAUF" That certainly is encouraging! Now I'll look at my newspaper a few mln;tcso (Takes up the" Extra") I might as well look at the .marriage licenses first. (Reads) "Delia Ott, Mildred Eiss, Leona G ibbs, Edith Wilke, Laura Woelfle, Jane Peterson, - 39

"Dear Prophet:- I'm sure you would enjoy an account of my aeroplane trip through Buffalo. When Vincent~ry, our driver, lowered the ship near Strat– meier's Musu: Han we saw four groups of people approaching us. At the J1ead, carrytng a huge sign on which were the words 'The Traveling No rmal Chorus' was

38

Evelyn Corcoran, Kathleen MciVlahon Anast o .: o W Id" (R d) "F ,~ 'am<;,us ,Lecturers i~ the City-How to Prepare a Book of the . yssey f~r Class ReCItatlon, by Ol~);n. How iVlany Brushes Belon 1fl One Pal ~t Box'"by Lu ella Tefft, The Clipp ngs in NIy Ec~ _ocl Economy Note~ book, I da Sperber. (Looks at the hottom of the page; then reads) "Mr. a nd Mrs ]or ph Sulllvan, Mayme Wordon, Cecelia Collier and Mary Coh"ell are spending a h eW b mOI~tl:s on the floa~in g Aeolcan I sle )), (Turns to the advertise11Ul1t5) Nawfor t c argalns and advertIsements ! VALLELY, KL!!]J" & WALKER CO. Tomorrow! SFecia~ sale of Tillou hammers for use in li braries. Only a few left! Sandtable Supplles-the homemade kind-Fiorence Repp and RO,!f1JUlg>Bili BargaLns III Log iCS, Psychologies, School- Laws, etc.- Tiffany's urad,," No'v fo th "5 . I ,r e ,0Cla ,. Odor. ea 5

1Jalrbtdory

The Peace Ylovement and its Relation to the School "with Vale–

ADDRESS:

dictory:

Classmates and Friends: Tonight is the last time that \ve a~semblc a"s a body. For two years we have worked together in the prepara tion of our lifework. \,Ve have been surrounded by influences that tend to reflection and refinement. Under the guid ance of our tcache rs we have been led to see visions of the broader field of service that may be ours. vVe have been led to realize that Oll r work will not be solely looking after the intellectual need s of our pupi ls. I n order to prepare the children to fulf1ll their part in the life of the community, the schools of today call fo r varied interests a nd activi ties. As teachers it will be our especial function to inspire and foster those habits of mind and heart which will aid in the betterment of the social orde r. Before we leave the shelter of our Alma \tIater, tonight, let us consider for a moment one of the problems which is hindering the public good and in the solution of which" we may be co-operating agents. No other movement for the advancement of civilization is more significant at the present time than that for arbitration and world-wide peace. Too long have the nations been engaged in the slaughter of human life. Too long has the wea lth of the people been directed toward satisfying the greed of the God of \\Tar. Time was when the savage met his enemy and settled his disputes wi th the club. It was then that the man of might was considered the man of right. But th e ethics of primitive times no longe r prevail; the man who is right is now considered the man of might; human nature is today vastly better and responds to a higher moral code. Statistics of the progressive nation{ reveal a deplorable situation. Stupen– dous sums from their treasu ries a re squandered for in struments of death and de– struction, while their poor a re unfed and unhoused; their ignoran t remain untaught. How many citizens are aware that every shot fi red from a battleship costs the sum of $8oo? Consider what this might mean for a boy's or girl's education. The money expended yearly for one battleship- about $12,ooo,ooo-if used for educational purposes would establish fifty manual training schools, properly equipped, so that each year 75,000 children might learn a trade. Is it not time that this reckless and useless expend iture of money be turned to useful and constructive ends? * • •

THE THOMPSON, COWLEY & THOMPSON BELL CO. Do you need a bell with a handle in your schoolroom? Buy it here! -- c

SHAEFER, ,·\lOOD & WOODS CO Deal~encil sharpeners that wor~!

Do you need training in the IvIontessori Ylethods? Collette Ryan and fiilaric Ceoghegan offer very reasonable rates

Teacher of Dramalic Art- May Phillips

Cultivation of the Funn y-Bone-Gertrude Kn-ickenberg Office hours, 9 to 2 :20 -- -

Special bargains for Friday an:! SaturJay at THE MABELLE. STRUBINC BIB SHOP Your cl:oice! Beautiful bow-knot patterns!

Ah I t wO~~fr if I the spor' page Cas anytLing interesting (turns to sport page) inciud a~e a no anger the natIOnal game! Pushball, fo remost. The new tea~ Ell K .GttruRde CoFyle, K~tHeen McTague, Celia Bley, Florence Mikulski en CIC er, ose ernbacn, F~orence Cowley and Emily Dixson ' . (Telepho1!: hell rings) Hello. Yes. Agnes? I was just about to ~a ll ou u lO' ~~:l f~u hY! ~lscouragemcntsl have vanished, for I have prophesied exa~tly, a~ter ab~ut i~( aye e ", mcDst wdobnde,~fu. day! Can you come to my home lamorrow and hear . . 00 yeo ALICE NlcKAY, Class Prophet

40

4l

Our minds and our hearts go out tonight to those two teachers, iVliss Helen L. Dunston and IV1r. Irving P. Bishop, whose long terms of usefulness in this school closed a few months ago. T heirs was the joy to have lived the richly abundant life. We have missed ·their genial presence, but to the large numbe r of students with whose lives they came in contact the memory of their kind words and mani– fold deeds will· be an inspiration in future years. • * * AGNES B. REIMANN

Jrtatntattnu of (tUaaa ~tft

From time immemorial it has been Lhe custom of man to mark in some defi– nite form the great epoch period in his life. Long ago, on the plain of Haran, J aeob dreamed his wonderful dream and beheld the vision of the angels of God ascending and descending upon the ladder. In the morning, 'when he awoke, he took the stones which had served for his pillow and made of them a memorial. One of the most magnificent avenues in the City of Paris is graced by a noble arch, dedicated to the triumphs of Napoleon. T his memorial is a constant reminder to the French of the conquests of war. But there are victories of peace as well as those of wa r- victo ries ennobled through toi l, through achievement. Though the passing :)ut of the Class of [913 does not mark an important epoch in the annals of h;.)tory, yet it is fitting that at this t ime ....ve, too, should think of leaving some token that will serve not on ly as a reminder of our achievement but also as a token of love and appreciation of what we owe to our Alma ~[ater. The present marks a new era in the history of tbe Normal. \¥e are about to leave this old building and go into a Ilew one. I t is not only an honor but a privi– lege as well to be the last class to leave these halls; a privilege, because ·it allows the Class of 19 13 to be the fi rst to show its appreciation of the new school. It is the wish of our Class, Dr. Upton, and it 'seems eminently appropria te that the Class of 1913 should combine its efforts with those of the Alumni Asso– ciation in erecting a beautiful fountain in the campus. In the years to come, as ' its waters sparkle in the sunlight or murmur .benea th the elms with · its thou sand tongues, may it tell and retell to those who fo llow us the story of Normal's achieve– ments. NIay it ever be a symbol to them of the inspiration that may be drawn from Alma Mater.

A 1Hatnu Sails spread, my bark in life's still harbor lies Prepared to bear me out on unknown seas. Once more I turn and fond ly landward gaze– ,"Vhat's that, all curtain'd by the swaying trees? A vision wonderfu l, a vision ra re, Of Normal Old, significant and fair! 'Twas this she whisper'd low, "I'm fading fast; Soon but a ling'ring shadow will remai n ; Yet have I guided well thy erring ways And taught thee how thy strength and pow'r to gain . \¥hen storms and tempests howl, behold in me Thy beacon. Hope retain. Farewell to thee!" But while I looked it vanished from my sight, And through my dr.ooping sails the soft \vind blew; The mist before my wonJ'ring eyes was cleared, And with resplendent walls stood Normal ·New! The sky above, the living green beside, The elms, the spacious doors, now open'd wide, '''ith one accl?rd a twofold message breathed,– 'Twas not all meant for me, b.ut yet I heard The blessing and the invitation, too,

And fa in would I repea t each living word,– "Embarking daughter, claim thy beacon new; o future daughter, we would welcome you."

- ALICE McKAY

43

42

3Juutnr.a

THOMAS ] . \IcDo~ NE LL IvI ARTON H. C HASE L UCY C LARK :i\L\RY ivIAx"vELL

President Pice-President

Treasure1' Secretary

Yellow and Wh ite COLORS

Daffod il

FLOWER

(!J lU.!1l1 iRu U

~vIcDONN ELJ., CATHERINE B. fitl cD oNNELL, THOn-lAS J. l'VIc:vLHfON, 'TERESA IVL-\RZOLF, F LORENCE l\tL\XWELL, lVIARY L. ..VI ERRIFIELD, H. BERNICE :\;IuRPHY, :\;IAY

BASTIAN, LIL LIA)j" B ANC ROFT, Lou BEALE, BEATRICE

BIERCE, S TE LLA BOLE NDER, FRED \V. BUST ED, HELEN F. CHASE, NIARION H. CLARK, Lucy K. COATS, GEO_RGE D. CONISKY, E STHER NT. CUNNINGHAM, E LIZAB ETH DRAK E, E. ~ IA Y Du:nAP, H ATTIE J. HARRIS, SARAH J. H UNT, ALICE C. JACKSON, FLORE NCE

NEWTON, FRONIA

PARANT , G L ADYS

L. GENEVIEVE

POMEROY,

ROGERS, lVhLDRED H. ROWLEY, R UT H SCANLON, KATHRYNE L. SE LMAN, LORETfA

SMITH, EMMA

SMITH, OLGA

WvNT, emu c.

44

A- F

ADOLF, ORA ALEXANDER, IIAROLD L.

CASTIN, REGI~A CARSIDY, HELEN K .

ANNIS, AIMEE As'!', R AYMO XD

COCKBURN, CORA

CHURCHI LL, ETHEL

AUST IN, ]E:'fNIE

COLl.INS, J O H K A. CaLVI)'!, ELIZABETH C.

BARNES, ELI L:ABETH

1\1.

BAXTER, KLEAH

CO;'; DON, ANNA

BALL, ~vL-\nEL BENDER, .HILDA IV!. BERKEY, R UTH ?vL BI~ACKLOCK) RUTH P. BLACKl\IORE, ELMA L. BRIGGS, IVA i'vI. BRIGHAM, ALICE H. J. BROWN, HILDA H. BROWN, HELEK H. BROWN, lVI ARY E. BULL, ALICE H. CARTER, MARtAN H. BRISTOW, LAVINA

COSLINE, EVELYN COSTELLO, JOSEPH wI. CRAW l;'ORD, CASSIE D. C REAHAN, NONA F. D ESMO;vD, FRA:\, KLIN lVL Dr LUCIA, BEATRICF. L. DODGE, Ln.LtA" Z. D OOLEY, GRACE H. DOOLEY, ROMA NUS EDWARDS, B E RT HA L. ESTABROOK, GLADYS FISHE R, RUTH H.

FRUEHAUF, FLORENCE

46

G-P

G J\ LVTN,- A UCE K. GAUCHA'r , EUNICE GILL, V ERA r. G ILLIS, lVL.\RE L I.

lVlcCANDIE, ISABEL E. MCCARTIIY, HELEN :VlcCu E, RUTH N [cDoNOUGH, J .n,LI AN lVICDONOUGH, :rV[ARY iVlcGOKIGA L, ETHEL :VIcGOVERN, ELLEN NL-\CNAUGHTON, l\IARIAU

HAACKER, LILLIAN I-L\GADOR:\i, HEI.EN ~L HALL, RUTH C. H ARMON, LUCY ~1. HEANEY, JOSEPH A. HEAVEY, IvL-\RGARET ivI. HENRY, EMMA

lVIcTIGUE, :YIARY ~IIACKL I :-i, H AZEL

lVL-\LONEY, J ULIA R. IV[ANEY, FRANCES ..\J". YIANNING, :\Lu. y E. ·IVL.\RTIN, FLORENCE

HERLAN, ETHEL H. HILL, COR NELIA ::\:1.

HINT, INA i\II. HI NT, lVIABEL

MAx, NATA LIE ~/IEYERS, EVA

HINTON, l'vTrLDRED F. HOPPER, GLADYS K. HYNES, I SABEL

iVhKUT.SKI, ALICE NfLTSCHER, HELEN

J.

i\'IoHR, GLADYS iVIONTGOMERY, BERTHA .E. MORAN, ELIZABETH ;\IORAN, ELIZABETH C. lV[ORRISON, GRACE MURPHY, GERTRUDE NASH, GRACE :VI. NELLIS, NATALIE K. NEVI NS, CH1\RLO'rrE A.

JAGER, ESTHER 1\1 . J ENSEN, CLARA S. JOpp, H ELEN

K ALLA, JULIA E. K ANE I-I L, GERTRUDE C. KEELTY, ::\IL\lUE

K ERR, H E LENE B. KISSINGER, JULIA KLEIN, SUE ]. KLEITZ, LEONA F. KRENZ, l\1ARGARET

N EWELL, HATTlE A. NEWHOUSE, \ '[A RTHA O'BRIE)l, :VL-\RY C. O'CONNOR, AGNES J. O'DONNELL, ..\IIARY E. O'LEARY, i\'[,\RY :VI. ORT:'>lER, LILLIAN OSTERTAG, ALBERT G. E. PELLER, OL_GA \V. PRICE, LOUISE T. PARKER, GRACF.

L ANDE I., CORINNE V. LEARY, ANNETTA F.. LEWIS, HARRIETT E. LI NDNER, GERTRUDE IvI. LOERSCH, HILDA LONG, J ESSAMINE LONGMATE, :NIrNERVA

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