History of Terrorism (Spring 2018)

***Subject to Revision

H ONORS 202: T ERRORISM IN THE M IDDLE E AST S PRING 2018

P ROFESSOR A LBERT L. M ICHAELS

R OOM : B ULGER 2W

P ROFESSOR Y ORK N ORMAN

D AY & T IME : R 6:00-8:40 P . M . O FFICE H OURS : R 4:30-5:30 P . M .

O FFICE : C LAS C207 P HONE : 878-3678

BY A PPOINTMENT ; O THER A RRANGEMENTS A LSO A VAILABLE

E-M AILS : A MICH 10425@ AOL . COM ; NORMANYA @B UFFALOSTATE . EDU

D ESCRIPTION

This course covers the history of terrorism in the Middle East from the end of the Second World War to the present struggle against ISIS. Terrorism is generally defined as the use of violence and threat against non-combatants to achieve political ends by individuals and political movements. In this class we will look at a variety of terrorist movements and government responses beginning with the FLN in French Algeria. The course will then move on to examine jihadi terrorist groups, from Islamic Jihad and Hezbollah to al-Qaeda, the Taliban, Lashkar-e Taiba and ISIS. We will conclude with the problem of jihadi terrorist recruitment and radicalization in Western Europe and America today. This is a multimedia course, meaning that every week we will have an online introductory lecture, a formal class meeting, and a followup discussion forum. The online components of the class are on our Blackboard website. The introductory lectures will also be available to the general public as podcasts.

O BJECTIVES

Students who successfully complete this course will: • develop a working knowledge of terrorism and its impact on world history. • interpret historical events critically by examining primary and secondary source documents. • improve their ability to write more clearly and effectively by composing a series of one- page summaries, and two 4-6-page or one 10-15 interpretive essays.

H ISTORY & S OCIAL S TUDIES E DUCATION D EPARTMENT L EARNING O UTCOMES

1. Student demonstrates mastery of subject material. 2. Students demonstrates knowledge of historiography. 3. Student is able to identify and interpret primary sources. 4. Student understands the relationship between cause and effect. 5. Student appreciates different cultural patters, behaviors, actions, and the influence of ideas on human behavior. 6. Student is able to write clearly and effectively according to the standards and conventions of the historical profession.

T EXTS TO BE P URCHASED

Berman, Terror and Liberalism Chaliand & Blin, The History of Terrorism: From Antiquity to ISIS

Esposito, Terror in the Name of Islam Weiss, ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror

G RADE A SSIGNMENTS

70% Essays: each student must submit EITHER two (4-6 page) footnoted, typewritten papers from a list of paper topics on the three-course sections OR one (10-15 page) interpretive essay on what you learned from the course . The paper topics for the three paper option will be given at the appropriate time. Students may choose to submit additional papers beyond the required three four extra credit. The essays must demonstrate familiarity with all appropriate lectures, films and assigned texts. Significant opinion differences among the various sources should be discussed. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with the professor if they encounter any problems conceptualizing the paper topics when writing the papers.

All papers must show deep familiarity with both lectures and texts !!!

Respect for the deadlines is part of the student’s responsibility. Required papers must be turned in on the proper due date (March 1 and May 10 for the two paper option; May 10 for the single paper alternative). There will be no toleration for failure to meet this commitment.

Extra credit papers may be turned in at any time but only one paper may be submitted at any class. Students may design their own topics with the permission of the instructor.

30% Class Participation: The grade for class participation will reflect the student’s attendance both online and in class, online written exercises, answers to discussion forums, degree of preparedness for each session, and ability to participate in class and online discussions of the

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lectures. Students are responsible for all the material covered in lectures, discussion sessions & in the readings!

Discussion Forums: Follow-up discussion forums will be held on a weekly basis. Students must submit answers to guiding questions. The discussion forums will be available on our Blackboard course website immediately following a class session. Students have exactly one week to complete the assignment. Regular participation in discussion forums are mandatory, and will be regulated according to the stated attendance policy. The answers to the discussion forums constitute an important part of the overall participation grade! Response Papers: Students have the opportunity gain extra-credit by composing one-page responses to each of the films covered in the class. To receive credit they must submit these responses within one week of the class. If you turn all your response papers on time, your overall course grade will be raised by half-a-letter.

O NLINE A TTENDANCE P OLICY

Lectures are designed to supplement the readings and will often present topics and ideas which have not been covered in the assigned readings; therefore, regular attendance for the online lectures and discussion sessions―are necessary to fully understand the materials covered. Absence from more than three online lectures or online discussion forums without permission will result in dismissal from the course. Attendance will be taken at every online class.

LECTURE SCHEDULE & READING ASSIGNMENTS:

The Road to 9-11:

February 1 (@ Burchfield): The Algerian War Readings: Chaliand, 175-220; Michaels Handout Film: The Algerian War

February 8: Islamic Jihad and Hezbollah Readings: Chaliand, 255-313 Film: The Sword of Islam

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #1 DUE

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February 15 (@ Burchfield): Black September Readings: Chaliand, 221-254 Film: Munich

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #2 DUE

February 22 (@Burchfield): The Hamburg Cell Readings: Chaliand, 314-348. Film: Hamburg Cell

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #3 DUE

March 1: Summary Discussion of Section

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #4 DUE

Post 9-11:

March 8: The US Response (Part One) Readings: Chaliand, 398-419; Esposito, all. Film: Zero Dark Thirty SHORT ESSAY #1 DUE

March 15: The US Response (Part Two) Readings: To Be Announced Film: Syriana

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #5 DUE

March 22: The US Response (Part Three) Readings: Berman, 1-102. Film: Eye in the Sky

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #6 DUE

March 29: SPRING BREAK: NO CLASS

April 5: The German Response Readings: Berman, 103-214. Film: A Most Wanted Man

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #7 DUE

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April 12: The Mumbai Massacre Readings: Chaliand, 420-434. Film: Mumbai Massacre

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #8 DUE

April 19 (@Burchfield): The Rise of ISIS Readings: Chaliand, 435-452. Film: The Rise of ISIS

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #9 DUE

April 26: The Home Front (Part One) Readings: Weiss, 1-142. Film: La Haine

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #10 DUE

May 3: The Home Front (Part Two) Readings: Weiss, 142-348.. Film: The Three Lions

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #11 DUE

May 10: Summary Discussion of Section

Online Answers to Discussion Forum #12 DUE SHORT ESSAY #2 DUE LONG ESSAY DUE

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