SSG03

Long Players

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I Who asked him? "I love it! It's so strong! It knocked me out when I first heard it and it's still growing on me! It's basically got three qualities - a strong, heavy beat, a constant beat and lots of tffings about stars and planets in it - stuff that Americans like!" -Mick Box of Uriah Heep talking about a cut op Heep's new album, Swee·t Freedom spring tourj and Eno (late of Roxy Music) funneled their respective group's sound and acted as a coating while still · shining in their own right; if there is _a purpose in Ha\\\kwind's syntjlesizer effects other than to accent the chaotic feel that Hawkwind preoccupies themselves with, it's generally lost. Hawkwind's saga is what you want it to be. The more you get involved with them, the more you 1 believe - it becomes elaborate. If they are as dumb as they look, their stupidity is probably instinctive. If they're doing this on purpose, if it all does make sense in some elevated fashion, they're definitely poking fun at us. Seemingly paradoxical is , the fact that Hawkwind make Pink Floyd sound like the Defranco Family and most heavy metal bands like Black Sabbath sound like classical composers. As for Space Ritual, it's doomed to become a, lost masterpiece. But if they're consistent with their philosophy, they won't care if no one buys it, right? Hawkwind have adhered to a simple formula : rather than help the audience to accept an image, they create their owh and dare you to accept it. It's worked in England (as has David Bowie) but in , ~erica, the general audience is not tuned into experimentation; look at the charts. What amazes us is how rock Energy via pop, which is formula-based is not accepted and rock Energy ~ia electricity isn't accepted either. American kids don't like formulas and I they don 't like experimentation. What's left? Groups like Hawkwind, the definitive heavy metal masters of the 70's left out because of no exposure. ' s;ace Ritual' isn't for everybody, obviously, but it's hoped that those who crave this kind of Energy blast will find it themselves : we've done all we can . 1 • -Michael Sajecki/Gary Sperrazza

side two is, appropriately enough, the Kinks "Where Have All the Good Times Gone." Here Ronson imitates the ·Davies Brothers combined guitar_ sound and Bowie rreats the vocais much like Ray's foppish intonation. Bowie even printed the words to 1 it on the inner sleeve as if to emphasize the conc;ept of the albU:m. With. this set of · illus ionary neo-punkers, is Bowie really showing his admiration or is this an act of · self-indulgent egotistic parody? At ,this _point, any deviation from what he has done wouldn't hurt his career any and this album is, certainly a deviation. The new saluting th_e old. What more could we ask for to paint an accurate picture of the current trend in pop music? -Andy Cutler

Hmmmm . . . How would you like to spend New Year's Eve with this little number? ... No, not her, you ninny. We speak of the young lad at top right. The Billion Dollar Babies Holiday Tour wiII be in :Buffalo Dec. 31, making it a very special Alice Cooper New Years Eve Party and for around $6, you 're all invited, nice guy , that Alice is. The back-off band is Z.Z. Topp and the whole thing is brought to you by Festival East. More next ish. morning Kidz show served only to cement this image. ·Maybe it was a label change to Columbia, maybe he's been saving this stuff for now, maybe he's getting laid regularly, whatever it was that inspired him to produce such a magnificent album as Comic Book Heroes ; if the same young audience that has followed him to now picks up on · Springfield's newest , we're gonna have kidz dancing ih the streets again 1 Needless to say, Rick Springfield has written all 11 tunes on Heroes and has , tied them together around . a comic book-like theme exposing fantasies, creating images and satisfying with a great collection of pop tunes, at times, resembling the pop approaeh of Andy Bown. Del Newman helped with his great orchestral arranging (he did that fine job on .Pete Frampton's Wind of Change) and Rick has a set four-piece band of his own with himself (guitars), Mike Moran (keyboards), Dave Wintour (bass) and Terry Cox (drums). After a short piece introducing the album concept, Side one opens with a . piano-dominated honkytonk rocker. "Weep No More" serves as an excellent veh icle for Springfield's light but

David Bowie PINUPS . DAVID BOWIE (RCA)

Here it is, the ultimate in punkoid . wimpasilic adulation, Bowie's Top 12 for the years 1964-67. All are classics of the English punk I scene and Bowie redoes them ingeniously if not slightl\/mockingly. Now that he's a "star" he wants his public to see exactly what these songs have done t.o and for him. The Spiders are intact except for the absence of drummer Woody Woodmansy, . ably replaced by Aynsley Dunbar of Mayall and Zappa fame. Pianist Mike Garson, whose celestial .tinklings greatly helped Alladdin Sane, plays a more important role here and Mick Ronson lurches out with more pseudo-Beck licks. "I Wish You Would' ' and "Shapes qf · Things," the ·Yardbirds opuses, are given new light by Bowie, the former with strong punk guitar overlaid with soaring synthesizer and the latter by Bowie's British-y phrasing. "See Emily ~lay" by Pink Floyd sounds like it could have been from Bowie's Man Who Sold The World period and explodes into an interpolation of "Also Sprach Zarathustra." The Who's "I Can't Explain" bursts open with a strong sax intro but then plods on sounding l~ke the original with somebody dragging their fiJ'lger on the turntable. Also included are near-forgotten gems like the Mojo's "Everything's Alright" (Aynsley Bunbar is ai;i ex-Mojo), Them's "Here Comes the Night" and the Mersey's "Sorrow" (released as ,a single). Closing

Here's Hawkwind, passing the time trying to figure out our review, while waiting for the next bus · to the Sun: "But we 're attacking view of Earth onto the audience, who, at this point, must be so intoxicated by the unreality of the whole Space Ritual that it passes unnoticed. The many other tunes are a furthering of the 'basic electric theme set down previously. Surprisingly, Space Ritual is recorded well; Hawkwind, during the mixing, miked the drums and bass upfront to add. the physical impact lacking in home seclusion, that is, versusa ·concert setting. That's why Hawkwind, i some of thei~ incredibly long passages, can s~stain interest because of drive , you really feel the music. · Lemmy deserves special mention as he is the best power bassist around; he brings Hawkwind back to · the ground which defies their basic policy of asce.nsion. Lemmy's bass-chording is so rich and full that it, at times, functions as a rhythm guitar when Dave Brock goes through cosmic-menstruation. Drummer Simon King must have a stand-in . . . or th~ drums play themselves; to sustain such energy and tightness throughout this double album is indeed astounding. Dettmar andpikMik, while e'nhancing the special effeci·s and giving Hawkwind a distinctive style, fall short of their potential at Hmes in light of other's accomplishments on the synthesizer. For example, M. Frog (alias Jean Yves Labat, who accompanied Todd Rundgren cm his

gonna get there.at night so we won't burn up.,,

Rick_Springfield ' COMIC BOOK HEROES RICK SPRINGFIELD (Colunbia) Jesus, what a surprise this is!!

Above: American vs. British reaction to Space Ritual: "But can you dance to it?" We guess so, as evidence' by the 'love and peace' generation (below) spreading their · movement on a 'brother' (bottom, left center) at a Nov. 1973 Hawkwind concert.

Just when I begin to feel depressed about the whole state of popular music depicted mainly by the current rancid condition of radio, the prime breaker of new talent, along comes 'this breath of fresh air from ,Australia who has the energy, power and talent to shake most of the pop music world right off its feet and this is just his second album! Having previously thought of Mr. Springfield as just another in a long line of David . Cassid,y pube-hear~hrob, cash-ins, his first Capitol album and single along with his current stint on a Saturday

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