Sandler Training - August 2018

WWW.CROSSROADS.SANDLER.COM / (208) 429-9275 / AUGUST 2018

FIND YOUR EDGE

LET SANDLER TRAINING EMPOWER YOU TO TAKE ON GENDER BIAS LEVEL THE PLAYING FIELD THROUGH LISTENING

Out of all the ways Sandler Training empowers me to have an impact professionally, changing the perception of women in the workplace has to be the most significant. Recent conversations surrounding gender bias have certainly brought awareness to the issue, but they haven’t addressed the factors that perpetuate this continuing problem. I don’t see gender bias as an overt action that is intended to keep women from progressing to leadership roles. Instead, it’s become an unconscious bias that has been ingrained in our society.

around since the 1920s, and I was only the second woman ever to hold the title of president. I was treated with respect, but women in leadership is not a 50/50 proposition. Men are primed for these positions, and women are often members of their staff — they’re the executive assistant or administrator and consistently work in support roles. Most of that is because the qualities we value in effective leaders are most often associated with men. I did some research on characteristics in job postings and came across a study by The Bureau for Employer’s Activities (ACT/EMP) on how job ads are unconsciously geared toward men. Women are often associated with the following adjectives: emotional, mild, sensitive, warm, friendly, and affectionate. Men are associated with the following characteristics: dominant, achievement-oriented, ambitious, self- confident, tough, and aggressive. What the study suggested was that these male-oriented adjectives were much more prevalent in all the postings. When you think about your own business, when is the last time you used “emotional,” “sensitive,” or “friendly” in your postings?

“ “BECOMING A THIRD-PARTY LISTENER WHO ISN’T EMOTIONALLY INVOLVED ALLOWS ME TO APPROACH PROBLEMS FROM A SOLUTION-ORIENTED MINDSET.”

When I worked my way up the ranks of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI), I never encountered blatant discrimination or gender bias. But at the same time, NARI had been

A woman who is viewed as having “male” traits is often viewed as bossy and demanding. These terms are considered compliments for

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