Measure Magazine, Vo. IX

measure The Fashion Magazine at Marist Vol. IX

What does TRANSPARENCY mean through an opaque lens?

“Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.” -Thomas Jefferson “Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.” -Thomas Jefferson

Measure magazine is the window into a Marist College student’s identity. We came here, as hopeful students, with the collective goal of obtaining a degree, but throughout our collegiate experience, we have collected more. We have dove past the impenetrable surface of fear and stretched ourselves to reach honest truth–even in the form of uncomfortable insecurity. We have moved towards a new definition of inclusivity, welcoming all phenotypes, cultures, and gender expressions. In this issue, the Transparency Issue, Measure magazine acts as a cellophane wrapper, capturing the feelings of a Marist College student in a blanket of lucid and exposed vulnerability. Rip through the plastic, and what you find will be clear. We are sure of it. Measure magazine is the window into a Marist College student’s identity. We came here, as hopeful students, with the collective goal of obtaining a degree, but throughout our collegiate experience, we have collected more. We have dove past the impenetrable surface of fear and stretched ourselves to reach honest truth–even in the form of uncomfortable insecurity. We have moved towards a new definition of inclusivity, welcoming all phenotypes, cultures, and gender expressions. In this issue, the Transparency Issue, Measure magazine acts as a cellophane wrapper, capturing the feelings of a Marist College student in a blanket of lucid and exposed vulnerability. Rip through the plastic, and what you find will be clear. We are sure of it.

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CONTENTS

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Contributors Facts

27% 20.22%

Serving Size: Volume (9g)

Amount Per Issue Contributing Teams

The Marist Fashion Magazine must not only be visually compelling and substantive, but entirely free of error. Along the way we have worked together as a team of dedicated collaborators, gaining skills and developing techniques that will make us better artists, writers, designers, and scholars. Every class member has experienced all facets of production, but we have divided ourselves into the following groups to get the job done.

Editorial : the literary narrators, molding the concept of transparency.

Social media : the .com composers, posting the importance of transparency.

Art : the virtual visionaries, stretching the vision of transparency. Fashion : the creative collaborators, melting together beauty and transparency. Branding : the decisive drivers, building in-person presence of transparency.

20% What does transparency mean to you?

Editorial

the future honesty be truthful to oneself openness

3.85%

Director: Nora Hogerty Assistant: Keara Pearson Junior Research Editor: Vivi Quan Nguyen Junior Copy Editor: Madison Riccardi Junior Caption Editor: Paige Khare

3.85% 3.85% 3.85%

to see through

3.85%

Social Media

20%

truth

3.85%

Director: Ashleigh Eden Assistant: Melina Sideratos Daijia Canton Aliah Chamorro Caroline McColgan

brightness bold vulnerability creative liberty growth

3.85% 3.85% 3.85% 3.85%

3.85% responsibility

Ellie Thomas

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Layout and Design

20%

3.85%

Director: Emily Larson Art Assistant/Typographer: Roman Katona Junior Graphic Designer: Kira Curley Junior Layout Designer: Keira Schnur Junior Digital Designer: Jeremy Gourgues

simplicity inclusivity authentic communication

3.85% 3.85% 3.85%

visibility

3.85%

lucidity

Fashion

20%

3.85%

authenticity

Director: Marley Gi ord

3.85% 3.85% 3.85%

commitment to ethics integrity virtue

Assistant, “Glass Ceiling”: Ally Conlin Assistant, “The Plastics”: Carolina Hollanda Assistant, “Fox Hunt”: Eduardo Vega-Salvador Assistant, “Study Break”: Jaime Schaus Assistant, “2031”: Natalie Sweeney

3.85%

clarity

honest representation

3.85%

Branding

20%

3.85%

Director: Nicole Sullivan Assistant: Morgan Franz Olivia Holmes Ashley Casucci

accountability

3.85% 3.85% 3.85% 3.85% 3.85%

certainty multi-leveled genuine thoughts crystal clear

Maxx Nelson Caroline Kelly

lucent

Transparency 100%

Transparency means consistent communication. Build a dialogue within yourself, your community, and us: @measuremag.Marist

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colophon

PHOTOGRAPHY ANNA KELLER CAITLIN FRACASSO VIDREW MCQUEEN SOPHIA BELL MADELINE MASON JULIA HEIKO ISABELLA NUZZO NINA BISCO AUTHORS MADELYN FERBER KEARA PEARSON EMILY LARSON faculty advisor R. SCOTT FRENCH

MODELS

ANNA HAGENBUCH KEON LEE MEGAN GRIFFIN CAROLINE VOORHIS

SHIVANI PATEL DYLAN BRODER

ELIZABETH ROBERTS ELIANNA SELEARIS ANDRIANNA SELEARIS

KHMARI AWAI AVA SALERNO

CHE OBRIEN-PAPPALARDO JUSTINE SURENA-MATTSON ANNE MAHLER ANNABELLE MILLER TYLIAH TAYLOR AMY OZOLS BLYTHE WENINGER EDUARDO VEGA-SALVADOR

JULIA PANAS GRACE KIRK

OLYVIA YOUNG NORA HOGERTY VIVI QUAN NGUYEN

BRIA ROYER TARA SEARS OLYVIA YOUNG JESSE SIMARD KEANNA WILLIAMS

Support

JOHN BARTLETT ELLIE HEINZINGER DOORI CHUNG SONIA ROY JENNIFER FINN PALACE DINER CROSSWINDS EQUESTRIAN CENTER

GLAM TEAM

AVEREY HOMER MACKENZIE ZEYTOONJIAN AINSLEY BURNS CHAIYAH CHAMBERS ASHLEIGH EDEN NICOLE SULLIVAN BRIA ROYER

MERIDIAN PRINTING 1538 S COUNTY TRAIL EAST GREENWICH, RI 02818 INFO@MERIDIANPRINTING.COM PRINTER

MARIST COLLEGE 3399 NORTH RD, POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 PUBLISHER

COPYRIGHT ALL CONTENT INCLUDED IN MEASURE IS SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE MARIST FASHION PROGRAM.

CONTENT and EDITORIAL POLICIES

ALL CONTENT PRODUCED BETWEEN THE MANAGING TEAMS (FASHION, DIGITAL MARKETING, ART, AND EDITORIAL) HAS BEEN GENERATED IN THE BRAINS OF STUDENTS AT MARIST COLLEGE,UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF THE ACADEMIC ADVISOR, RICHARD FRENCH, THE STUDENTS IN THE MEASURE MAGAZINE PRODUCTION COURSE MANIFEST A CONCEPT AND BRING IT TO FRUITION. ANY FOUND IMAGES HAVE BEEN EDITED FOR PERSONAL ARTISTIC USE.

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MODEL: ISABELLE LEBOEUF DESIGNER: BLAKE TROWBRIDGE

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MODEL: ISABELLE LEBOEUF DESIGNER: BLAKE TROWBRIDGE HAIR & MAKEUP: MACKENZIE ZEYTOONJIAN, CHAIYAH CHAMBERS

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Mass production and plastic, at first, were thought to change the world: modular, large-scale manufacturing using affordable, long-lasting materials. But, massproduction brought about impersonalization and plastic haunts us with its non-decaying immanence. The materials represent a yearning for reuse, scraps yarns repurposed into a time-tested sweater dress, expendable packaging crafted into a delicate jacket and pieces of sailboat, personal archive stung into exuberant patchwork creating a pair of comforting duvet trousers, and polyester takes on a particular faraway charm, one that vivifies the mind to imagine adventures.

MODEL: ISABELLE LEBOEUF DESIGNER: JORDANA SELBY

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MODEL: EDUARDO VEGA-SALVADOR DESIGNER: ROGER SEIFERT

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MODELS: AMY OZOLS (LEFT) BLYTHE WENINGER (RIGHT) DESIGNERS: AVA GRAND (LEFT), SARAH SHERPA (RIGHT)

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KP: How did you work to overcome those feelings?

KP: Tell me about yourself!

AH: “My major is biomedical sciences, my interests are in public health and non-profit work. My ultimate goal is to work with international and national non-profits in public health. Specifically, I would like to bridge those gaps between people and accessible healthcare. I am currently working on my honors thesis, which focuses on Refugee Health and Cultural Competency in Healthcare. It is a big title, but basically it means that refugees come into different countries and there’s a whole process in obtaining healthcare. Every culture is vastly different and it is never the goal to push one person’s culture onto another. So, there needs to be a competency and understanding that people are different and come from different backgrounds. My other passion is social justice and anti-human trafficking work. I’ve worked with the National Trafficking Sheltered Alliance to support a national network of safehouses for trafficking survivors and the Walk Her Home organization to launch high school and college clubs in hopes of educating students on signs of trafficking” KP: When did you get involved with these organizations? AH: “When I was in high school, I presented a project on anti-human trafficking and was connected with providers treating survivors at a free medical clinic in my area. It was mind boggling to hear that victims were being trafficked in my community and it was a common issue across the U.S. Later, I was connected with the CEO of Walk Her Home, which is a national nonprofit that focuses on restoring survivors of trafficking and educating students in how to identify and respond to trafficking situations. Later, I was given the opportunity to work with one of Walk Her Home’s beneficiaries, the National Trafficking Sheltered Alliance, on their referral service that connects survivors to residential care programs. For survivors, their exploitation often destroys their social, physical and emotional well-being which requires extensive long-term therapies to restore them from their trauma.” KP: What have been some obstacles you have faced? AH: “The biggest obstacle I face is usually myself, I still get burnt out and my main enemy can sometimes be my own mindset and my need to always do everything right. But, you don’t have to be perfect, no one has to be perfect. You also don’t have to say yes to everything, your well-being has to come first or the effort you put in won’t be your best effort. That is easy to forget when you are trying to help people in an impactful way.”

AH: “I have some really really good friends who are always encouraging me to have fun in between. I try to remember to think of myself sometimes too. Someone once told me, `You know no ones going to be perfect, that’s only God, so it’s not going to be you.’” KP: You mentioned finding what’s meaningful to be of great importance to you, so what do you find meaningful? AH: “My faith would be number one because we are only here on earth for so long. I would say social justice is very meaningful to me and having respect for others and always being aware of others and their needs is really important. One quote I always think of when I need motivation is, ‘If you dont stand for something, you will fall for anything.’” KP: How did you develop this mindset? AH: “ My parents raised me in a very specific way. I was taught to never put my head in the sand and to always be making sure that the people around me are treated respectfully and given opportunities they deserve.” KP: What is your main focus in SGA? AH: “ The Student Well-Being Board’s main focus is social, physical, and mental well-being. We’ve worked to connect students with community resources, as well as the resources on campus. Honestly, my role would not exist without my team, my team is everything. One of the main things is, I am delegating and learning how to be a better leader through this experience. This semester we are working on an iLearn site that will contain all necessary student resources relating to wellness. This includes links and contact information for students, that way students can be aware of support available throughout campus. We are also looking to ensure that underrepresented groups on campus such as LGBTQ+ and BIPOC are represented in wellness. Something that often gets forgotten is that wellness doesn’t look the same for every person. So, making sure everyone has the opportunity to be well on campus is important.”

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY: ANNA KELLER

MODEL: ANNA HAGENBUCH DESIGNER: BLAKE TROWBRIDGE HAIR & MAKEUP: NICOLE SULLIVAN & AVEREY HOMER

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KP: What would you like to see happen with your role and everything you’re doing once you move on? AH: “I would love to see wellness incorporated into things on campus, like mental health days, and students communicating with their professors when they need mental health help. It would be great to build an overall feeling of community for groups that are often overlooked, like the international community or graduate students. If we can incorporate wellness on a larger scale and make sure everyone is represented, my work would be done. The last thing would be to really connect the community. There are so many amazing resources here in Dutchess County, and people always talk about the ‘Marist Bubble,’ but there are ways we can build those connections and students can get involved in the community surrounding Marist.” KP: You have worked so closely with many individuals here at Marist, what has the community here shown or taught you? AH: “Students at Marist have taught me the value of a community and utilizing others strengths and diverse experiences. I’ve learned that I can grow through different people’s perspectives; so, the main thing is putting myself in other people’s shoes and making sure I’m hearing them out and using leadership roles to amplify other points of view. “ KP: Share some wisdom you have gained that you would like to extend to others. “ALWAYS KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN AND WHEN PROBLEMS ARISE, AS THEY ALWAYS DO, SEEK OUT SOLUTIONS.”

“I would say there are three steps: 1. acknowledging there’s a problem, 2. coming up with a solution, and then, 3. having a backbone to implement that solution. * Also, always have a backup

plan and a team you can rely on!”

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KP: You talked about how your ultimate goal is to work for an international non-profit focusing on public health. If we’re taking a look into the future, what have you accomplished in this position? AH: “If I could help, not only implement policy, but also implement solutions that are tangible and relate to health disparities that would be ideal. I see myself on a global scale, making sure people have access to the proper healthcare and resources to successfully live their lives however that may be, and delivering the respect that they deserve in that process.” KP: What does it mean to you to be the coverstar for Measure? AH: “Well, I think I was a little taken aback just because I was like ‘Who? Me?’ I don’t think I am anyone special. But, to me, being on the cover means I have the opportunity to raise awareness for all of the causes I am working towards. It really is a privilege to be on the cover, there are so many amazing people here at Marist.” KP: Is there anything we didn’t touch upon that you would like to address? AH: “Students looking for internships, look into nonprofit work especially relating to social justice. It is really important because we are all getting something out of Marist, so we need to make sure we are giving back a piece of what we are getting.” Human trafficking involves the force, fraud or coercion of individuals for labor or sex. The $150 billion industry is so widespread, even in comparison to the drug industry, because a person can be sold multiple times, but a drug can only be sold once. Human trafficking is most commonly seen in relationships where a power dynamic allows one individual to manipulate another, resulting in their dehumanization and mistreatment. It is common in every state and can happen to individuals from all walks of life. Survivors of trafficking are immensely strong individuals who are capable of reaching their full potential. Walk Her Home’s mission is to “raise awareness of the factors that drive demand for trafficking and support the restoration of victim-survivors of sexual exploitation.”

The National Trafficking Sheltered Alliance (NTSA) has the mission of “enhancing services and increasing access to care for survivors of human trafficking and sexual exploitation.”

For more information visit their websites at walkherhome.org and shelteredalliance.org.

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ANNA’S TEAM

and the words they live by

”Everything happens for a reason.” - Keon Lee (Sophomore, Criminal justice)

”It only seems impossible until it is done.” - Megan Griffin (Junior, Political Science)

”She Believed she could, so she did.” - Dylan Broder (Senior, Fashion Design)

”Love with your heart in mind.” - Shivani Patel (Senior, Biomedical Science)

“The powerful play goes on, and we all much contribute a verse.” - Caroline Voorhis (Junior, Biomedical Sciences and Spanish Major)

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BY: MADELINE FERBER

Fashion is not simply what we drape our bodies in.

To me, fashion is a broad term that encompasses all the tiny objects that decorate our bodies. Like a charm bracelet of notable moments, feelings, and inhibitions, fashion reflects the passing of age and all that signifies it. Staring in the mirror used to be easy. Looking at my reflection used to mean seeing bruised knees from gymnastics, or from dance class. Their purple palette was a medal for all the tricks I was brave enough to try. The ruby-red stains I saw used to be scrapes across my knees after attempting to ride a bike for the very first time. The bloodshed was more than a consolation for the freedom I felt. My reflection showed me, sun-kissed cheeks and grass stains on my elbows from playing outside with neighborhood friends for hours-on-end. The reflection showed all my teeth arranged in a full grin that spread across from ear-to-ear in genuine elation. But now, I see something dierent. My reflection now reveals that the red on my cheeks has turned into something not done by the sun, but from blush that I have painted. Suddenly, attractiveness is no longer dependent upon who can run the fastest at recess, but on the cosmetics lining a bathroom countertop. When was it that the red on my knees no longer stemmed from pavement scraps, but from anxious scratching away at my skin? Or that the bruises that remain on my knees are now kept company by ones on my neck and my hips... And why is it that the cheesy grin has turned into downward angles from monsters disguised as friends and lovers? Why is it that youthful ignorance slipped away from me, not only, in the form of mental bliss and torment but in the physical form as well. As if to remind me that I have become the version of myself I had promised never to be. Bruises, blood, and red cheeks have aged me as they have aged with me.

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The nuclear is becoming unclear. Under the shards of shattered glass, we are working as disruptors to shed the future of forced stereotypes and assumptions. Geometric outerwear bends the lines between expectation and reality. Their strict lines arch, allowing space between the binaries to lengthen. Leather laces between two separate entities and ties together an environment for growth. A diner holds within itself a place for nostalgic regression, but we tear through that comfort and lean towards the future.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: ANNA KELLER

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MODEL: JUSTINE SURENA-MATTSON DESIGNER: KRISTEN NASTA HAIR & MAKEUP: CHAIYAH CHAMBERS, ASHLEIGH EDEN

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MODEL: CHE OBRIEN-PAPPALARDO DESIGNER: MARK BISSELL

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MODEL: JUSTINE SURENA-MATTSON DESIGNER: ASHLEY CATALANO

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MODEL: AVA SALERNO DESIGNER: MADELINE MCCARTHY

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MY FASHiON LOVE STORY BY: GRACE KIRK

It’s not you, it’s my closet space. My first real relationship was with Fashion. Like many stories of young love, we went through our rough patches, we let insecurities and trust issues almost break our bond. But, our story is more than the

pitfalls. To better understand our tumultuous love story, we have to start from the beginning…

As a young girl, Fashion was my form of self-expression. I was inspired by the style icons in my childhood bubble of Disney Channel. Hannah Montana and the entire cast of High School Musical took over my childhood dreams. Their sequin-lined-lifestyles were the influence behind my go-to outfits. My lack of greater Fashion knowledge made me the curator of my own style rules. I dressed myself for school every morning, sporting animal-print pants, Bobby Jack t-shirts, and hot pink jelly sandals with the utmost confidence. I felt warmth in tones of neon, and took every comment on my perfectly curated outfit as a compliment. I treated my grade school’s hall as a runway and my favorite water fountain as the hottest watering hole in the north east block of lockers. There, Fashion and I were unknowingly working together. We were a will-they-won’t-they relationship waiting to finally make things oˆcial.

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RELATiONSHiP STATUS: RELATiONSHiP STATUS: FALLiNG iN LOVE

Like many 2013 tween girls, I “Pinterested” and “Tumblred,” my way throughout adolescence. I consumed YouTube hauls, Instagram posts, and Internet blogs daily. Initially, I was so inspired, but soon it became too much for my developing mind. The posts that started to consume my feed were a step-by-step guide to being universally accepted. With the endless supply of smiling faces, I felt enforced to remain happy all the time. In the infinite sea of thigh-gaps, I was reminded to strive to be skinnier. The never-ending camera rolls of e€ortlessly beautiful girls, taught me to wake up earlier to do my makeup, but pretend my routine just involved rolling out of the bed. Clothes around me started to pile up as I tried to reach a stage of self-acceptance, but it was never enough. The mountain of one-time-wear polyester ate at my self-esteem fast. It was never ending; I kept pinning, reposting, and sharing. On the treadmill of social media consumption, I was doing the “12-3-30” trend with every double tap and saved album. I created a digital world of Fashion glory, constantly changing and evolving at speed too fast for even the fittest of social media “areobaholics.'' But, at one inevitable point the tread always fell o€ the track and my dream world of ombre hair and designer clothes was replaced with reality. Logging o€ meant checking into awkward middle school crushes and antagonizing acne. Suddenly the fairy dust of all my Fashion fantasies settled into a blanket of dirt settled across the street of my suburban reality. The more I gave into the fantasy, the worse I felt about myself. Fashion had led me in with coercions of happiness and bliss, but the honeymoon phase flew through my feed and a new story unfolded. I opened my eyes to life beyond the screen and realized.. Our relationship was indeed a one-way street.

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RELATiONSHiP STATUS: TOXIC AF

Fashion and I grew apart as I grew older. I discovered the larger world around me as I transformed into a young adult. I developed my love for helping our planet. I traveled outside the internet dystopia of my own creation and realized how much diversity and beauty there is in the real world. While Fashion still had a place on my dating roster, I started to see flaws that contradicted my new found passions. Stores I used to worship were accused of overconsumption. Toxic body standards in modeling lead to a lack of diversity in my monthly subscription to Teen Vogue. I would tell friends and family about my dreams to study Fashion, and their reactions almost always ended in them picturing me as a character in the Devil Wears Prada. They imagined me being ridiculed by coworkers,

putting designer labels before human connection, and struggling to keep up with raging fad diets to remain a sample size. Most people disapproved of my relationship and no one could see what I saw in Fashion. Their doubt made me start to question myself. Why do I unconditionally

love something that has hurt me in the past? For the first time in my life, I felt Fashion and I might need a break. But still, I felt guilty for the secret love I still held for it.

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RELATiONSHiP STATUS: IT’S COMPLICATED RELATiONSHiP STATUS:

The summer before college, the pressure was on me to declare a major. I researched every possible career path. Maybe, Biology and its beakers could replace Fashion and its buttons? Or, could Political Science and its Policies outshine Fashion and its storytelling? Through this speed dating process, I was determined to enter a new and fresh relationship, breaking it o with Fashion once and for all. Maybe, Fashion was a first love and an even better partner was hiding inside the course catalog of Marist College? But my breakaway from Fashion was met with another break, this time a break from all I once knew. The pandemic. We were pushed back into our homes, and challenged to experiment in hobbies that the previous world left no time for. I devoted my quarantine to sewing, thrifting, blogging, and seeing the inspiration in everyday life. I saw my childhood love for Fashion inching back into the picture, but this time I saw Fashion in a dierent light. I grew out of the young girl clinging to a sense of acceptance and bloomed into a young woman with passions, taste, and artistic ability. I started to flirt with Fashion once again; creativity, self-expression, and art drove my rekindled romance. I experimented in style without the noise of the world around me, and the butterflies started again. I was reconnecting with my first love, but this time with boundaries. Fashion is not my personality; it reflects my personality. Fashion may make the rules, but so can I...

CURRENT RELATiONSHiP STATUS: REKiNDLiNG AN OLD ROMANCE

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F O X

MODELS: TARA SEARS, CLEO DESIGNER: PEMMY FRIEDMAN HAIR & MAKEUP: BRIA ROYER

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H U N T P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y : M A D E L I N E M A S O N

The age-old tradition of fox hunting has prevailed over the centuries, and much like fashion itself it has evolved. Equestrian attire has influenced fashion since its conception and continues to do so. A collage of dancing bulls is reminiscent of a typical farm-scape. Blazers, suits, and scarlet boots are evocative of many elements of the huntmaster’s uniforms. Then, in contrast, green cotton suiting resembles the fields that the hounds, the horses, and the foxes gallop through. Detailed leather pieces and metal buckles remind us of that which composes the tack riders outfit their horses with. While fox hunters may have never worn chaps or chunkyknit bolaroes, our unbridled scene offers a fresh take. Tally-ho!

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MODEL: JESSE SIMARD DESIGNER: SHERIDAN DEVITO

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MODEL: KEANNA WILLIAMS DESIGNER: PEMMY FRIEDMAN

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MODEL: BRIA ROYER DESIGNER: DYLAN BRODER

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MODELS: OLYVIA YOUNG, ATLAS DESIGNER: ALLY CONLIN

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BY: JULIA PANAS

I am a doll. I am a doll. This body is a doll. I dress her up and paint her eyes blue and pink and black black black. I make her walk–

from the counter to the coee maker to the sink to the counter again to the door to the stairs to the street. I play with her give her ridiculously tall shoes and pair her up in relationships (because he seems “interesting”). but sometimes she gets entangled and he steals some of her strings and he plays with her, too. I hear the whispers all all the time but it doesn’t matter what they say about me because I chose her. I am the one who drinks her coee I am the one who manufactures her beauty I am the one who is intoxicated with sticky pink love pumping in my veins I am the one who suers her consequences. but really— I’m just playing.

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Doll your page up and share your personal doll ensemble with

@measuremag.marist

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Julia Heiko (19, she/her, Sophomore/Junior-standing):

“When taking this photo, I was really focused on experimenting. I wanted to create something that was beautiful but also confusing. I love creating ambiguous art that gets people to look twice. While looking through the lens, I saw so many things at once like obscurity but also beauty. To this day, this image and that whole shoot is one of the favorites I’ve created.”

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S c c h w a lu tr o th

TheRealTalk

Measure Magazine Exclusive Interview with the Founder and CEO of TheRealReal, JulieWainwright.

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W in W “ p W a s m T fr in s

By: Nicole Sullivan

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“Bing!” Your phone sings with excitement, but what could the notification hold… A text from Marley Gifford about the recycling drive, an Instagram post from @measuremag.marist, an alarm warrning you about the Measure launch event? Not this time. This specific “Bing” is an exciting alert that your RealReal certified yellow Hermes Birkin bag is on its way to your doorstep. In the click of a button,you have joined an unspoken group of select individuals: Not just the Birkin buddies, but the growing second-hand shoppers society!

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Q: Did you have knowledge of consignment business previously? Or were you just a shopper?

Second-hand shopping has grown in the last decade as consumers have learned more about the dangerous consequences of fast fashion. But, the customer knowledge has been equally met by luxury second-hand businesses who have developed specific steps in ensuring certification, authenticity, and condition. One front runner in the field of luxury second-hand fashion is The RealReal. With their tried and true team of authenticators, vast marketplace of designer goods, and key focus on customer satisfaction, they have gained a designated group of second-hand designer devotees. The one woman behind all of this pre-worn magic is just as interesting. When asked if she was scared of failing, jumping into an industry she knew nothing about at such a late age, Julie Wainwright, Founder and CEO of The Real Real smiled coyly. “I’m not scared of failing, because I have already failed so publicly, that it can’t be any worse.”By her mid 50’s, Wainwright had had multiple successes as a CEO, and a few failures, but ultimately decided it was time for her second act. Wainwright founded The Real Real, an online marketplace for authenticated luxury consignment, in 2011. The idea was planted in her head after shopping with a friend. The two entered a luxury consignment boutique and in the span of 20 minutes, Wainwright’s companion had spent thousands on second-hand pieces. A business light bulb lit in Wainwright’s mind and the next chapter of her professional career began.

A: “Neither. I’m a business person, I have knowledge of business and e-commerce, and this is an e-commerce business. The fashion industry so often gets cut off as frivolous or unimportant, but there is real logistics that go into crafting a business from start to finish. Fashion, and luxury consignment for that matter, is no different.” Q: What do you see for the future of consignment in the fashion industry? Is it becoming the new norm? A: “Second-hand shopping has already become the new normal! There will always be a demand for luxury goods, and resale provides products at a better price point. The connection is clear, especially with the insight on sustainability in fashion. The RealReal prides itself on giving luxury, designer pieces a second life.”

Q: Can you speak to the diversity within your company?

A: “The RealReal is made up of about ⅔ women, with a large majority being people of color. We place a grave importance on equal opportunity in the workplace, and a majority of that ideology comes from my prior experiences in corporate America. I wanted The RealReal to reflect the Real world, a world that is made up of very different people and ideas.”

Q: What advice do you have to students who are worried about failure?

A: “There are ups and downs in any decision. But, I like to think of success in relation to baseball. Some of the best baseball players have a batting average of .33, meaning they failed 67% of the time. Yet when they come up to bat, people still look at them as the greatest. Success is relative, and hard work pays off at the plate.”

y!

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BY: OLYVIA YOUNG

The want and need to please has taken over how I function, on more than one occasion. I feel weight on my shoulders, To be everyone else’s version of myself rather than the unedited reality. I have been haunted by the need to reach perfection. Instead of wearing printed pants with a pink top, I wear pull on jeans and a T-shirt. Instead of saying I really liked the controversial show at NYFW, I agree with the crowd and dismiss it as unoriginal. But why? Why not own up to having my own taste? Why carry around the guilt of being unable to enjoy my own opinion? We all fall into this cycle of agreement. The toxic and manipulative hate that others carry, leaks into our own creativity. Each of us is telling our evolving story through what we wear, creating movements instead of styles. But with this energy, we all possess a strong responsibility to be our true selves. And yet, so often I have fallen short of the task. I started the eighteenth year of my life in a new and uncomfortable state of existence. My closet became my enemy as I tried to ignore the garment I held dear, in exchange for trendy purchases that fit the norm. My favorite pieces swayed alone on their hangers, as they were cast aside. Their l oneliness hurt me too. I looked at my favorite clothing, unworn for weeks and realized why I had exiled them to fashion purgatory. I realized I had simply talked myself out of wearing the clothes I loved because I was utterly terrified that someone would have a problem with it. Why? If it was my style, if it represented me, why change? My answer always came back to fear. A toxic voice moved into my mind and suddenly external opinions mattered more to me than my own. I was a vessel for the ideas of others, and a shell of my own individuality.

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Yet, while trying to exist within four walls, I still yearned to dance outside the lines. It is ironic when you think about it. The fashion industry, built around the idea of beautiful creativity in all forms, can still produce such feelings of shame, exhaustion, and competition. There is an unmentioned standard throughout society that in order to be accepted, one must dress relatively the same… create the same art… appreciate the same aesthetics. Through this toxic mentality, imperfection is inescapable in a person’s exploration of themselves. The fashion industry has built itself up on words like “trendy,” “cheugy,” “in,” and “out.” The phrases hammer the nail into the small box we group ourselves into. Their meaning becomes worthless when we use them to categorize ourselves and others. We are all masterpieces desiring admiration. We are all individuals, not one exactly like the other. So, what is our call to action? How can we bury the burden, the toxicity, and the guilt? How do we rise to the task of being ourselves instead of falling short? The answer is simple. We must hold ourselves responsible. Someone very honest with themselves once told me,

“LIFE IS NOT ABOUT FINDING

YOURSELF ; IT IS ABOUT CREATING YOURSELF.” When we take a step back and think about creating ourselves in an industry such as this, we are presented with

immense responsibility. By realizing that we are all individuals who are capable of being true and honest, we will then attain what we have been yearning for. Outside the box, lies perfection.

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MADELINE MASON

Madeline Mason (19, she/her, freshman):

“I favor black and white portraits. Monochrome photography highlights the hidden details that the viewer tends to overlook when distracted by color. .

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Madeline Mason (19, she/her, freshman):

“I want the focus of my photographs to be on the emotions expressed and the lines created by the light.”

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Anna Keller (21, she/her, Junior):

“This photo was taken at my cousin's house in upstate New York. He was having a small concert out of his garage and invited all his closest friends and family. I wanted to take this shot because I loved how the front of this land rover was symmetrical and this also happens to be one of my favorite car models.”

ANNA KELLER

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study break PHOTOGRAPHY BY: VIDREW MCQUEEN

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MODEL: TYLIAH TAYLOR DESIGNER: CAMILLE MCHENRY HAIR & MAKEUP: AVEREY HOMER & CHAIYAH CHAMBERS

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MODEL: TYLIAH TAYLOR DESIGNER: CAMILLE MCHENRY

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MODEL: ANNE MAHLER DESIGNER: KAITLYN KRISTOFICK

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MODEL: ANNABELLE MILLER DESIGNER: MELODY JIMENEZ

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When a book opens, a reader is welcomed to a story. Our story is told through twirls of chiffon, loops of cobalt and the intertwining of jersey. Welcome to our world. Illogical images bring one’s mind to peace, let us take a break… Focus on the whimsical and fun, let your imagination take over! Do not confine to what society or fashion tells you is ‘normal’ or ‘good’. Take a study break to scope out the abnormalities. Extravagant dresses with grandiose silhouettes depict an alien from the library, multi-colored knits turn passing time into playtime and tulle trails the floor of the trading room. Have fun, see through the mundane places and make it yours.

MODEL: TYLIAH TAYLOR DESIGNER: ALEXANDRA LAUCELLA

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MODEL: ANNABELLE MILLER DESIGNER: CIANA STAGON

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Nina Bisco (19, she/her, Sophomore):

“Pictured here are my first and only pair of Jordan’s. They were delivered on a snowy day, where I noticed the sky perfectly matched the shoes. So, I was quick to grab my camera. There’s nothing like getting a new pair of shoes, but that day was special”

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NINA BISCO

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4

ISABELLA NUZZO

Isabella Nuzzo (20, she/her, Sophomore):

“Although I usually plan all of my shoots, this one was spontaneous and it turned out to be one of my favorite photos. I was teaching one of my good friends how to skate and the sun was just setting. I had just nailed my first trick and love how I have this memory in a photo.”

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4 CHAMP

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MATURITY IN FLUX.

BY: NORA HOGERTY :

My gingham-patterned Nike Air Max Kicks shuddered as they stuck to the ground with the first step, this was far past the Clorox-wiped tiles of their accustomed living situation. Watching their step, they played hopscotch in between scattered Solo cups holding candy-colored liquids. Seizure-inducing LED lights, commonly known as “boy lights,” twitched between pneumonia-mucus green and mall-fountain-chlorine blue. The lights dangerously shook from the pounding bass produced by the harmonic echoes of 21 Savage and Sage the Gemini. Only two Command Strips held the lights and the ambiance of the entire room in their delicate synthetic claws. Not to worry, a tool box, still sealed by the clearance sticker, stood guard under a pile of old t-shirts. To the right, the overflowing laundry basket took on the shape of a Venus Fly Trap, perhaps the shirts it sunk its claws into weren’t originally pigmented a sickly-yellow? There in this neon, in the shadows, the accessories of an unfinished manhood scatter across a desktop. The most menacing figure, a consistent drip of Dove Men+Care 2-in-1 Shampoo and Body Wash soiling a cup of unbaptized, sharpened, pencils.. The room was lived in, personally decorated by an impressive amount of bottle caps. All were aligned meticulously on the mantle, creating a mosaic of wrinkled metal. The mottled backsplash gleamed as the glow from an opened mini-refrigerator spilled into the room. On its shelves, the refrigerator revealed only a jar of pickles. The kind with the stork on the front, purchased by their boy’s original stork. The bird cast watchful eyes over a blooming independence. But, she was only allowed a peek when a box of leftover Giacomo’s pizza earned the right to be chilled.

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The grunge and mess was almost inviting. The nostalgia and instant feeling of disgust carried with it a whiff of growth and independence. There, I found inspiration in the novelty of coming into one’s own. I expected a college boy’s dorm room to be just as grimy as a laptop keyboard after finals week; scattered with remnants of Pop-Tarts, coffee, and hopefully the celebratory crumbs of off-campus food bought by an upperclassman. That room personified the period of adolescent purgatory, where flaws are expected. A time when guardians make the pilgrimage for “Parent’s Weekend,” and pretend they aren’t completely appalled by the Brita Pitcher still waiting for a filter replacement. There is an extreme beauty in the limbo of developing independence, the kind of charm that deserves to be leaned into. Clench onto the Dove Men+Care 2-in-1 Shampoo and Body Wash, keep a jar of unacknowledged pickles in your refrigerator, realize that you are still full of promise. Within developing independence there lies an unabashed belief that you are the coolest that you have ever been, and an inner hope that life can only get better. The willingness to wear a “Class of 2022” t-shirt to class and then, with that same enthusiasm, wear a Marist College lanyard around your neck as a righteous gemstone. The nonchalance in adolescents to wash your face and body with the same chemical liquid. In this developing state of being, people are sponges, willing to try out faces in the hope of becoming their true self. That self that has been carried by the stork waiting for its chance to land in the “real world.” Inside this ecosystem of evolving development, all I could feel was jealousy. I felt robbed of a level of grimy development that was expected from the men in my life. The ability to grow at a pace where crumbs collected under a duvet cover wasn’t a luxury awarded to the college girl. While I exerted extra effort into unsticking my sneakers from the linoleum, I realized that my push into independence started the moment I could conceptualize my own gender. There was an early-forced maturity, where I felt I must learn that femininity comes lined with boundaries, expectations and standards. The Stork pushed me to understand my own existence, because, if I didn’t, I would be a step behind.

While I watched my brothers have the length to grow into their selfhood, I felt pressured into a narrowed-lens existence. Inside that mold of man-made, socially-constructed identity, I thought I would find acceptance. Acceptance not just from the world, but an acceptance for myself. I felt I had to learn to live within the lines of a system, shrinking myself to fit inside the standard. Not too loud,not too messy, not too out of control. My laundry would never have the audacity to overflow, my flashing Brita Pitcher light would be as alarming as a smoke alarm, and my fridge would be an inner reflection of myself: stocked with acceptable attributes. But, what if I chose not to? What if the bold ability to exist without apologies could be found inside a pickle jar, strung up with an LED light strip, or dove into with an overflowing laundry bin. What if my Nike Air Max Kicks needed to get a little sticky?

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( G )

ENDER DYSPHORIA

By: Vivi Quan V Nguyen

Phenotype My high school had a restriction against boys having long hair, in fact, most schools up to high school where I’m from in Vietnam have this rule. After an intimidating and arduous process to fight the school’s rule, I kept my hair. But, ever swince I grew out my hair, I found a lot of people have trouble referring to me, even past the walls of my former highschool. If being a “man” or a “woman” relies on factors as silly as hair, what does it mean to be a “man” or a “woman?” I quite enjoy the confusion, I feel a certain liberation not being associated with any one gender. Division A bio-essentialists might argue that gender is divided by an essential, inherent physiological line. But the truth is, this division is less a border and more of a gradient. Advanced biology and the existence of intersex people disprove the clarity of a gender binary. An argument of the reproductive system won’t hold water either; how would this argument categorize infertile people? Theories of gender equality and feminism disprove any actions or characters as exclusiveto any gender. Metaphysically speaking, gender equality means all genders are equal, the same, interchangeable, one might go as far as to say all genders are one…

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I used to feel uncomfortable. I found indifference in the space I took up, the voice I used, the mannerism I presented. One day, I woke up realizing that I’ve merely been doing what I do to fill up the nothingness that bridges the moments between the dining table, the news, and the bed. But, I figured if I were to go onward with life, I need more intention and understanding in my actions. The hair became one of my first deliberate choices. I realized that I have always had the ability to deliberate, and I decided to use that gift. With no social, national or gender restrictions to tie me down, I wanted to experiment more with expression, with lifestyle, with appearance. Like a meal at first bite, hearty and filling, the next flat and dull, or a bed once freeing and airy, the next empty and cold, the way I compose myself changes like the season. I get dressed today, and then get dressed again tomorrow, a bit differently, an unending process, constant DYSPHORIA: from the Ancient Greek word for excessive pain, a state of feeling unwell or unhappy; a feeling of emotional and mental discomfort and suffering from restlessness, malaise, depression or anxiety.

practice, more or less a perpetual…

Transition.

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