Foust Law - February 2019

FEBRUARY 2019 THE

COMMUNITY CONSCIENCE

FROM PAC-MAN TO FORTNITE

Raising kids can be a challenging endeavor. When Heather and I were married in 2013, she agreed to take on not only a husband but also two boys: Andrew, 12, and Chandler, 11. The boys are now 17 and 18 years old and face growing up in a world very different from the one Heather and I knew when we were teenagers. We are far from perfect parents, but we do our best. Our newsletter chronicles some of our successes and some of our less-than-stellar moments. We hope you can learn from some of our failures and find some entertainment in the moments we share.

One fateful evening at Columbo’s Pizza Parlor in Bozeman, Montana, I gained serious “street cred”with my teenage boys. Despite being in retirement for over 25 years, I was able to get back on the Ms. Pac-Man horse and totally destroy Andrew and Chandler at what was a mainstay at the video arcade when I was a teenager. I didn’t just beat them, I humiliated them. I more than doubled their score every game we played — a moment of glory I will not soon forget. While playing video games was a once-in- a-while treat when I grew up, today’s kids are falling into what experts are calling a compulsive psychological disorder when it comes to video games. As crazy as it may seem, addiction to video games is a real problem all over the world. In a WebMD feature on the definition of addiction, psychiatrist Michael Brody set forth the following criteria:

1. The person needs more and more of a substance or behavior to keep him going. 2. If the person does not get more of the substance or behavior, he becomes irritable and miserable. If your teenager cannot get enough of a video game and becomes miserable if it is taken away, he or she may be more than just a little cranky. Video game addiction is real. My wife, Heather, and I each grew up in homes largely without video games. (In the Foust house we purchased Pong some time in the 1970s and an Atari in 1983. They collected a lot of dust). Games today can become an all-consuming way of life for some kids. Heather and I made a decision early on that our home would not have video games. Like our decision to hold off on cell phones, we were in the minority. I had no

idea just how outside of the normwe were until I read a few articles on the subject.

I was amazed to discover from theesa. com that two-thirds of American families regularly play video games. And according to venturebeat.com, a staggering 80 percent of households own video game consoles. Although I now know I am a nerd, I would not change this for anything. Our house is on a very tight routine. Andrew and Chandler are at school until 6 or 6:30 p.m. We have dinner, they do their homework, we maybe watch a little television, and then we end the day. As busy as Andrew and Chandler are, I have no idea where they would find time to play video games. Like most rules, Heather has stuck to her guns, and we have not purchased a gaming system. I tend to think our world is a little bit better because of it.

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3 TIPS TO PREVENT RAISING A PICKY EATER When you’re trying to feed your child, keep them healthy, and prevent them from becoming one of those weird adults with the stunted palate of a 2-year-old, it may feel like you’re faced with an uphill climb. Research shows that fussy eating may be as linked to genetics as it is to upbringing, not to mention the tangle of other psychosocial factors that can fuel a child’s inscrutable food preferences.

That said, there are ways to help your child foster a healthy relationship with food and encourage them to be adventurous eaters.

1. KEEP YOUR EXPECTATIONS IN CHECK. When a child first encounters a new food, they’re going to give it the side-eye. That’s natural. In fact, according to a 2003 study, it may take as many as 12 “exposures” to a new food for it to become familiar, much less something they want to eat. If you put too much pressure on them to eat every last bit of the new food, that particular food won’t fare well in their memories and you’ll have to fight those negative associations from then on. Instead, talk about the new food as you’re preparing it, involve your child in the preparation, and have them check it out on their own terms. Normalizing those Brussels sprouts is half the battle. 2. AVOID TURNING VEGETABLES INTO CHORES. You might think that offering your child a reward in return for finishing their green beans is a good way to make sure your child gets their nutrients, but it causes more problems than it’s worth. It just reinforces

your child’s perception that the green beans are the “bad” food they have to choke down before getting to the good stuff.

3. MAKE A VARIETY OF DISHES. The more monotonous your nightly menu is, the fewer new foods your child will be exposed to, and the harder it will become to introduce healthy newcomers to the table. If your kids like green beans, great, but don’t start serving green beans with every meal just because you know those are the only veggies they’ll eat. Keep it varied and fun, and your kid’s palate will follow. You shouldn’t force your kid to eat food they don’t want to eat, but you shouldn’t cater too closely to their fussy habits either. Present them with a wide variety of the healthy options you want them to eat, and let them discover the joys of taste and texture as they grow.

Wild Divorce Settlements 3 Times the Division of Assets Got Out of Control

‘HERE, MY DEAR’

When you’re untying the knot, it’s important to be specific about the assets you hope to walk away with. These three over-the-top divorce settlements are good examples of what not to do when dissolving your marriage.

In the divorce agreement between the late Marvin Gaye and his ex, Anna Gordy, it was decided that Anna would be paid from the royalties of Gaye’s next album since he had gone broke from his lavish spending. At first, Gaye decided he’d phone in the production, but he quickly discovered an opportunity to make a unique artistic statement: “I’ll give her my next album, but it’ll be something she won’t want to play and it’ll be something she won’t want the world to hear because I’m gonna tell the world the truth.” In the end, the album was a commercial flop, though critics continue to praise its raw, emotional core.

YOU’VE GOT TO BE KIDNEY ME

A LIFE RENT IN TWO

Back in 2001, Dr. Richard Batista donated his kidney to his ailing wife, Dawnell, to save her life. Sweet, right? It was — until Dawnell filed for divorce in 2005 and Dr. Batista demanded she give back his kidney or compensate him for $1.5 million in damages. In the end, his request was thrown out in court because the kidney was a gift — and because removing it would be potentially fatal to his ex-spouse.

When Moeun Sarim and Vat Navy decided to divorce after 18 years of marriage, Moeun apparently decided that, to keep the split equitable, he and his wife should divide their assets in half — literally. Moeun and his relatives cut the home down the middle, dismantled his portion, and hauled it away. Vat’s half was left standing with one wall missing.

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Safe and Sweet

Allergy-Friendly Valentines for Your Child’s Classmates

For a parent of a child with allergies, every day can feel like a battle with food labels and ingredients lists — and Valentine’s Day only exacerbates this fear. Avoid the danger of an allergic reaction on Valentine’s Day by creating alternative, candy-free valentines that the whole class will enjoy!

hand-held games, markers, or bubbles. Adorn these little gifts with yarn, ribbons, or personalized tags, and slap on cute sayings to make them fit for the holiday. Finish off the masterpiece by having your kiddo sign their name on each valentine, and you’ve got a kid-approved Valentine’s Day favorite.

GET CREATIVE

FANCY UP SOME FRUIT

This valentine idea taps into your kids’ desire to create by using commonly found household items. Have your children draw pictures, create cards, mold tiny sculptures, or braid together friendship bracelets

If you’re worried about food allergies but still want to make a yummy treat, ask your child’s teacher for a list of students’ allergies, then just work around them. Fruits are usually a safe bet, but it’s best to double check. You could skewer strawberries and heart- shaped pieces of watermelon onto kabob sticks for a sweet and fun snack, or pass out goody bags with apples, bananas, and clementines. Offering a group snack that is allergy-friendly will keep your children and their friends safe and healthy, and it can also help children with allergies feel included in the festivities. As with all Valentine’s Day gifts, keep in mind that it’s not the item or money spent that means the most. It’s the thought behind each gift that makes receiving valentines the sweetest part.

to create one-of-a-kind gifts that will be safe for their classmates to enjoy. Kids can put their own effort into gift-giving, and their valentines will have a personal touch candy cannot replicate.

THINK LIKE A KID

If you’re looking for a creative valentine that will be safe for all your child’s friends to play with, check no further than the toy aisle of your local dollar store. While being mindful of latex allergies, you can purchase little toys that kids will love that won’t break your bank. Think bouncy balls, mini skateboards, Army men, yo-yos, puzzles, rubber ducks,

Take a Break!

TIRAMISU

INGREDIENTS

6 egg yolks

2 teaspoons dark rum

3 tablespoons sugar

24 packaged ladyfingers

1 poundmascarpone cheese

1/2 cup bittersweet chocolate shavings, for garnish

1 1/2 cups strong espresso, cooled

DIRECTIONS

1. In a large mixing bowl, use a whisk to beat together egg yolks and sugar until thick and pale, about 5 minutes. 2. Add mascarpone cheese and beat until smooth. 3. Fold in 1 tablespoon of espresso. 4. In a small, shallow dish, combine remaining espresso with rum. Dip each ladyfinger into mixture for 5 seconds.

Place soaked ladyfingers at the bottom of a walled baking dish. 5. Spread half of the mascarpone mixture on top of the first layer of ladyfingers. Top with another layer of ladyfingers and another layer of mascarpone. 6. Cover and refrigerate 2–8 hours. 7. Remove from fridge, sprinkle with chocolate shavings, and serve.

SOLUTION ON PAGE 4

Inspired by foodnetwork.com

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Foust Law Office

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

www.lucasfoustlaw.com 406-587-3720 Fax: 406-879-4400

3390 South 30th Avenue Bozeman, MT 59718

INSIDE THIS ISSUE From Pac-Man to Fortnite PAGE 1 How to Raise Adventurous Eaters PAGE2 3 Wild Divorce Settlements PAGE 2 Candy-Free Valentines PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Tiramisu PAGE 3 Couples Who Sweat Together Stay Together PAGE 4

SOLUTION

COUPLES WHO SWEAT TOGETHER STAY TOGETHER Why You Should Exercise With Your Significant Other

PLAY CATCH!

Each Valentine’s Day, people all over the world rush to the store to buy chocolates and all the ingredients necessary to whip up a romantic dinner for two. Unfortunately, these calorie- laden holiday traditions can undermine the fitness resolutions you made just six weeks before. Instead of throwing your goals by the wayside this February, why not make fitness a couples activity? The National Library of Medicine published a study showing that couples who focused on their health together went to the gym more often and reported feeling more connected in their relationship. These findings were corroborated by a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Scientists claimed that partners who exercised together reported higher levels of happiness and satisfaction in their relationship. If you and your sweetheart are looking for a romantic way to burn some calories this month, here are some great workout ideas for two.

Grab a medicine ball and do some overhead passes, feet-to-feet situp passes, and back-to- back twists with each other. All of these easy at-home workouts help build a solid core.

GO FOR A RUN!

If the weather is nice, the two of you can lace up and hit the pavement together. You could even make a couples playlist to listen to as you run. If the cold temperatures are preventing you from enjoying the great outdoors, head to the gym and challenge each other on side-by- side treadmills.

TRY SOME ROCK CLIMBING!

This is a great way to get a good workout while simultaneously building trust with your partner. Most rock-climbing gyms offer classes in belaying, and staff members can give you

tips to improve your form. Sign up to work with an instructor and test your personal limits together.

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