Y7 Summit Communique 2022

COMMUNIQUÉ 2022

CALL TO ACTION

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WE,

We strive for a world that is stronger together and call for furthering multilateral cooperation that is based upon shared common values, mutual respect and justice. We call for a progressive and future oriented G7 Summit and thus recommend to the decision makers the following policy recommendations on Sustainability, Economy, Democracy, Global Health and Youth, Peace and Security, that are to be found in this Communiqué.

the young representatives of the G7 members, the EU, in partnership with Indonesia, Senegal, South Africa and Ukraine, came together in Berlin to ensure that the heads of states of the G7 countries will include the young people’s voices on all vital policy issues in a holistic manner. We stand for inclusive, diverse and barrier-free youth participation that ensures all young people are heard and recognised.

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WE CALL UPON G7 LEADERS TO

Track 1 | Sustainable & Green Planet

Create a Climate Club aiming for a just energy transition and including meaningful participation of youth and those most impacted. The Climate Club’s carbon price floor should be set at a level to reach 1.5 °C, with differentiated prices, according to CBDR-RC principles, putting the onus on high-income countries. The Climate Club must include international revenue recycling and avoid carbon leakage by creating tariffs rather than exemptions for carbon-intensive industries. Track 2 | Economic Transformation for Shared Progress Succeed in the digital and environmental transitions of jobs. Develop and promote strong partnerships between educational and scientific institutions, industry-leading companies, start-ups, MSMEs, and social enterprises to ensure young people have wider access to paid work placements. Introduce a globally recognised, science-informed climate change certification program for decision- makers in the private and public sectors to promote ethical leadership. Track 3 | Resilience of Democracies G7 governments and their partners should create arms-length Civil Society Task Forces that will implement tailored communication and engagement tools to increase community participation in policy-making. The Task Force should be cognisant of local needs, proactively engage all citizens facing barriers to participation, and represent diverse youth and marginalised communities. Governments should finance the accessibility of digital and physical environments and economically enable participation to ensure deliberation processes are inclusive. Track 4 | Global Health & Solidarity As per SDG 3.4, improve the provision of support services in order to address growing challenges on mental health from particular crises, including climate anxiety and COVID-19. Services should be universal, accessible, effective and affordable across educational institutions, workplaces and the community. National requirements outlining standards for the provision of mental health education from the age of seven, coupled with national campaigns and training for universities and employers, to address structural causes and prevent discrimination. Track | Youth, Peace & Security Lead by example in the implementation of the Youth, Peace & Security (YPS) agenda. From young people’s participation in peace processes and strong partnerships with youth organisations to their protection and meaningful (re)integration, concrete actions for the institutionalisation of YPS is needed. Focus on young people in response to every conflict and war, including in Ukraine.

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TRACK 1

SUSTAINABLE & GREEN PLANET

The livability of the planet that we inherit shall be determined by the decisions you take and the commitments you implement now. Capturing this opportunity requires a dramatic increase in ambition towards a sustainable and just future.

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Nature and Biodiversity | Recommendation

The interdependency of biodiversity and climate change must be recognised through holistic policies which tackle the dual crises in tandem. Biodiversity on land and in our oceans must be conserved and protected from our most polluting activities. G7 members must:

1.2 Implement regenerative agricultural practices to protect biodiversity by committing to: (1) banning agricultural chemical inputs proven to be harmful to the health of organisms and the environment by 2030, (2) supporting seed sovereignty and (3) restoring agricultural land damaged by crises. Additionally, promote sustainable diets, including the drastic reduction of meat consumption and the implementation of ambitious animal welfare standards for livestock farming. 1.3 Take the lead on achieving no pollution by 2050 by implementing ambitious regulations and the polluter pays principle, restoring ecosystems, and adopting sustainable practice, ensuring compliance of corporations. Develop and implement wastewater and stormwater management systems alongside local stakeholders. Adopt a One Ocean governance framework to address contamination from military activities, stop deep sea mining, sustainably manage fisheries, and enforce marine no-take zones.

1.1 Create an ambitious global standard to define protected areas and classify 30 % of global and national land and marine areas respectively as protected areas by 2030, focusing on ecologically important and sensitive areas. Enhance protection through a ratcheting up mechanism and monitoring, reporting, and reviewing of these areas. Prioritise inclusion and empowerment of Indigenous peoples and local communities in decision- making, co-creation and implementation of these areas through funding and legal protection.

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Climate Crisis Mitigation and Adaptation | Recommendation

The climate ambition gap must be closed by strengthening and enacting global commitments to reach 1.5 °C, including enhanced NDCs by COP27. Ambition must be implemented in policies across a just and rapid energy transition, mitigation,and adaptation. G7 members must:

2.1 Make no further investments in new fossil fuel projects and redirect funding to renewable energy to ensure universal and affordable energy supply. Ensure a just transition by addressing energy poverty and security through measures addressing rising prices, energy inefficiency and consumption-based emissions. All transition measures should support affected workers and communities, particularly youth, through reskilling and financial support, and find decarbonised economic applications for fossil fuel infrastructure. 2.2 Accelerate urban mobility transformation by reaching a modal share of 80 % of cycling, walking and public transport by 2030. G7 members must incentivise and educate citizens — youth in particular — to use public transport and shared mobility, while massively expanding car charging stations and cycling infrastructure. Work to reduce high-emissions passenger-kilometers by banning short- haul flights, and drastically scaling up low-cost, high-speed train travel with minimal environmental impact.

2.3 Strengthen adaptation of the built environment by requiring inclusion of adaptation measures in urban planning procedures, developing crisis management through emergency planning, and funding for loss and damage. Adaptation should focus on Nature-Based Solutions (NBS) by encouraging investment while providing earmarked funding for high- impact projects and empowering local communities to co-create NBS — especially in high risk and impact areas. Governance must prepare for socio-economic climate impacts by developing resilient livelihoods.

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Global Partnership for Sustainability | Recommendation

Global climate cooperation provides an opportunity to create a just and sustainable world. We envision G7 support for international equity and truly sustainable economies. To fulfill the Sustainable Development Goals and lead the way in building a better world, G7 members must:

3.2 Advocate that advanced economies provide US$ 500 bln of public financing for climate change mitigation and adaptation to developing economies from 2020 to 2025 increasing thereafter and expand annual public financing for biodiversity by US$ 10 bln at Kunming. To promote climate justice, G7 members should provide 80 % of this funding due to their GNI and cumulative emissions and provide technology transfers. Recipient countries should have agency over these funds and ensure accountability and transparency. 3.3 Implement a “doughnut’’ economic model in high-income countries to create an economy that provides for societal needs whilst returning to planetary boundaries and drastically reducing our consumption of resources. Ban unnecessary disposable products, particularly plastics, by 2025. Pursue circular product design and eliminate premature obsolescence through investments in innovation and enhanced stakeholder cooperation. Promote a reduce and repair economy and recycle and dispose of waste domestically when no alternative exists.

3.1 Create a Climate Club aiming for a just energy transition and including meaningful participation of youth and those most impacted. The Climate Club’s carbon price floor should be set at a level to reach 1.5 °C, with differentiated prices, according to CBDR-RC principles, putting the onus on high-income countries. The Climate Club must include international revenue recycling and avoid carbon leakage by creating tariffs rather than exemptions for carbon-intensive industries.

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TRACK 2

ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION FOR SHARED PROGRESS

The economic transformations of our time disproportionately affect young people. To ensure bright futures for today’s and tomorrow’s youth, it is crucial to invest in education and innovation, safeguard and expand frameworks of social protection, and regulate markets to serve the common good.

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Economic Advancement through Education and Innovation | Recommendation

We call for the empowerment of young people and temporary protection seekers to enter the workforce with confidence and the appropriate skillsets. To foster environmentally and socially sustainable innovation, opportunities and capital must be accessible in a fair manner.

1.2 Connect temporary protection seekers domestically and in sufficiently- resourced partner countries with civil society organisations and trade unions focused on providing job opportunities and labour protections. Create culturally sensitive, mental health-informed resources for employers on integrating temporary protection seekers into their workforce. Establish tools for retraining employees and reintegration of refugees and veterans for their employment and inclusion in society. Provide temporary protection seekers with working permissions while accessing the same training opportunities and conditions as regular employees.

1.1 Invest 0.5 % of GDP per year in the

appropriate education and skills training for all to adapt to and succeed in the digital and environmental transitions of jobs. Develop and promote strong partnerships between educational and scientific institutions, industry-leading companies, start-ups, MSMEs, and social enterprises to ensure young people have wider access to paid work placements. Introduce a globally-recognised, science- informed climate change certification program for decision-makers in the private and public sectors to promote ethical leadership.

1.3 Provide equitable financing tools

including grants, concessional loans, guarantees, fully funded R&D programs, private equity, and venture capital for entrepreneurs, MSMEs, particularly those from or operating in rural, indigenous, migrant, and historically marginalised and underrepresented groups or areas. Financial contributions should be conditional on good business practices, market feasibility studies and mentorship to ensure the sustainability of the business model.

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Towards a Sustainable and Equitable Economic Order | Recommendation

We call for the elimination of structural domestic and international inequalities through the promotion of equitable development tackling dependency structures, the enhancement of labour conditions, and the provision of robust social protection for all.

2.1 Immediately increase the share of ODA budget to meet 0.7 % of GNI, with greater focus on Domestic Resource Mobilisation capacity. Catalyse investment from the private sector through public financing to achieve Agenda 2030, in particular financially support countries affected by catastrophes or war in reconstruction. Provide debt relief, including debt moratoriums, to HIPCs to ensure an equitable recovery and tackle structural inequalities. Extend the DSSI beyond 2021 and adopt the newly established Common Framework for Debt Treatments in a timely, transparent, independent manner and without credit rating downgrades. 2.2 Regulate unpaid employment opportunities and ban unpaid internships longer than one month. Protect migrant, gig and student workers by introducing legislation banning exploitative employment contracts and supporting their unionisation rights. Establish labour standards that ensure mental well-being in the workplace while promoting mental health services designed to meet workforce needs.

2.3 Expand social protection systems, and provide financial aid and access to resources, such as energy, food and housing to support all livelihoods and upward mobility given the crises exacerbated by inflation. Direct measures appropriately using methods such as community-based targeting or self-targeting. Give consideration for vulnerable and underserved groups, including informal economy and migrant workers, as well as workers impacted by the environmental and digital transitions.

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Responsible Markets and Fair Fiscal Policy | Recommendation

We call for the private sector to now act as one to exist sustainably, in particular through standards and access to transparent, reliable data. Efficient markets require equitable taxation and carbon pricing to reinvest in a just transition. Carbon neutrality must be a core object of capital deployment.

3.2 Introduce a fair and differentiated global carbon price no later than 2023. Support the swift implementation of the OECD’s BEPS 2.0 regulations to tackle international tax injustices. Promote a just and transparent international tax system and ensure tax subjects remain compliant to their jurisdictions. 3.3 Commit to collectively contributing at least 50 % of the IPCC’s US$ 3.8 tln per year energy finance estimate to advance SDG 7. Ensure public development banks accelerate progress towards this goal by crowding-in investments from the private sector, in line with the Framework for Aligned SDG Financing. Immediately introduce legislation requiring MNCs and public companies to publish Scope 1, 2, and 3 carbon- neutral transition plans. Decarbonise the portfolios and operations of public and development financial institutions, requiring full adoption of sustainability-linked and transition financing.

3.1 Establish global disclosure standards in compliance with those of ISSB providing transparent, measurable and comparable information on ESG by the end of 2022. Design standards to involve all economic players with a transversal approach in line with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development’s PSA. Mandate players to disclose the impact of their activity on the economy, society and environment to stakeholders, investors, employees and consumers, in order to provide youth with the information necessary for decision-making and advocacy work.

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TRACK 3

RESILIENCE OF DEMOCRACIES G7 governments and their partners should create arms-length civil society task forces that will implement tailored communication and engagement tools to increase community participation in policy-making. The task force should be cognisant of local needs, proactively engage all citizens facing barriers to participation, and represent diverse youth and marginalised communities. Governments should finance the accessibility of digital and physical environments and economically enable participation to ensure deliberation processes are inclusive.

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Education in the Digital Era | Recommendation

Reshape the educational system to equip citizens with skills to address challenges caused by digital disruption, including disinformation, digital threats, and ethical challenges. This should be achieved by incentivising youth participation and critical thinking from an early age, equipping them with the tools to recognise threats, including the ability to access and analyse messages in social and mass media and adapt to evolving societies to improve accessibility for quality education.

1.2 Eliminate technological barriers and reduce the digital divide by promoting lifelong learning in digital literacy, financing access to digital devices that facilitate youth education, and increasing digital infrastructure by ensuring governments provide broadband internet connectivity by 2025. This process must be fostered through the participation of G7 members and partner countries in the EDISON Alliance (WEF) 1 Billion Lives challenge. 1.3 To increase youth participation in collaborative processes to tackle societal challenges, educational institutions in G7 members and partner countries should incentivise project- based and collaborative learning in entrepreneurial, financial and sustainability practices, with a focus on internships, international exchange opportunities and civic volunteering. This will empower students to take ownership of real-world problems.

1.1 Strengthen critical thinking, the ability to assess the validity and appropriateness

of statements, to navigate the overwhelming consumption of

information. To foster critical thinking, independent decision-making, and structured argumentation, we ask G7 members and their partners to actively support educators to rework teaching practices to follow OECD principles . Educational practices for children from age six should be updated in formal and non-formal education with an innovative and inclusive approach.

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Safeguarding & Strenghtening Open Societies | Recommendation

Open societies should be strengthened and safeguarded by creating mechanisms that combat emerging threats to democratic institutions, increase transparency of social media platforms and protect civil society’s ability to engage in advocacy, especially for marginalised groups.

2.1 To provide a comprehensive

to increase government accountability. This must be complemented by educational programmes for civic organisation actors addressing using these instruments to empower and strengthen the efforts of marginalised communities to equally participate in advocacy and strengthen respect of their human rights. 2.3 To increase transparency and ensure good governance, G7 members and partner countries must ensure legislation for large social media platforms to provide API access to privacy-compliant data for thesis students and researchers. Settings should be included for all users to select and modify preferred options for recommender systems, with at least one option not based on profiling to safeguard against filter bubbles and algorithmic biases.

understanding of current threats, we call upon G7 members and partner countries to establish a unified, transparent definition of disinformation, human rights abuse, privacy, online safety, and violent extremism to streamline unitary enforcement. These should be developed with partners across civil society, including underrepresented communities, and annually updated through an independent mechanism, with the outcomes presented at the 2023 G7 Summit followed by annual implementation reports.

2.2 We call upon G7 governments to increase the transparency and

accessibility of the advocacy process by implementing public political lobby registers, legislation watchdogs, and improving freedom of information rights

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Reshaping Democracy for 21st Century Citizenship | Recommendation

To reshape democracy and democratise active citizenship, we should facilitate inclusive methods of engaging youth and marginalised communities who face structural barriers to contributing their perspectives, legislating the government’s duty to respond to feedback, and ensuring accountability and measurement of success of the policy-making process.

3.2 To make sure that citizens are

involved in policy making, we urge G7 governments and their partners to legislate a duty to respond mechanism by 2025. Accordingly, policy makers should proactively seek out citizen political participation and react to their proposals, with a particular focus on proposals from youth, marginalised communities, and people remote from civic issues. In the interests of transparency, responses should be accessible and easily comprehensible.

3.1 G7 governments and their partners should create arms-length civil society task forces that will implement tailored communication and engagement tools to increase community participation in policy-making. The task force should be cognisant of local needs, proactively engage all citizens facing barriers to participation, and represent diverse youth and marginalised communities. Governments should finance the accessibility of digital and physical environments and economically enable participation to ensure deliberation processes are inclusive.

3.3 Governments must support the

development and implementation of a unified framework that measures how citizens’ views are translated into policy reform to evaluate the inclusivity of the policy-making process. The evaluation list should be created and reviewed by international stakeholders from academia, government, and citizen groups. Accessibility for all should be facilitated in physical and digital means to ensure best practices can be shared with other communities.

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TRACK 4

GLOBAL HEALTH & SOLIDARITY As per SDG 3.4, improve the provision of support services in order to address growing challenges on mental health from particular crises, including climate anxiety and COVID-19. Services should be universal, accessible, effective and affordable across educational institutions, workplaces and the community. National requirements outlining standards for the provision of mental health education from the age of seven, coupled with national campaigns and training for universities and employers, to address structural causes and prevent discrimination.

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Women’s Health | Recommendation

In 2030, we want a world where women in all their diversity, inclusive of gender identity, are safe. Tackling gender-based violence and gender discrimination in healthcare (research and treatment) must be prioritised. Sexual and reproductive health and rights must be guaranteed.

1.2 As per SDGs 3.1, 3.7 and 3.8, the

underdiagnosis of diseases in women and gender differences in symptoms must be addressed. By 2025, more than five per cent of healthcare and research investment into women-specific health research is required. In addition, G7 members should raise public awareness of such diseases. 1.3 Recognising that abortions occur irrespective of legality and therefore to reduce the rate of unsafe abortions affecting women’s health, as per SDGs 3.7, 5.6, we urge G7 leaders to make abortion legal, safe, accessible, and affordable, until at least 14 weeks of pregnancy, and later if complications arise. Sufficient aftercare including psychological services should be accessible. Education from age 12 must include sexual and reproductive rights, safe sex practices, and abortion. Contraception must be fully subsidised.

1.1 As per SDGs 5.1, 5.2, in the face of gender-based violence (physical, psychological, cyber, including rape), we demand to fund and provide compehensive training, including monitoring and evaluation by 2025, for public servants to assist victims and children affected. Training should include detecting early warning signs and informing on the material and psychological support, and should be implemented by organisations with proven expertise in protecting women.

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Food Security & Conflict | Recommendation

In 2030 we want a world where we are taking adequate measures to combat income inequality, exacerbated by climate change, conflict, including agroterrorism, and preventable disease, so that in accordance with SDG 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, no person anywhere in the world suffers from food insecurity.

2.1 As per SDGs 16.1, 16.2, address food insecurity caused by the converging crises of COVID-19, climate change, and conflict and the economic consequences thereof by fully funding the WFP Global Response Plan, meaning a total of US$ 18.9 bln. should be provided for 2022. Sustainable food assistance programs should be accessible to everyone, regardless of sex, gender, country of origin, abilities, ethnic background, sexual orientation, age, religion or political beliefs. 2.2 As per SDGs 16.1, 16.2, to limit additional shocks to the global economy currently impacted by several conflicts, G7 members should commit to avoid setting up export bans on any products, champion the approach for other countries to follow, and use diplomatic means to unblock ports, while at the same time supporting

2.3 As per SDG 2.4, 2.5, ensure that disease prevention is approached through the One Health approach, therefore taking into account that human health depends on animal and ecological health, and that human-caused environmental and climate change speeds up spread of diseases, G7 members should contribute to climate adaptation efforts in partnership worldwide and implement early warning systems to catch diseases, starting in the most vulnerable areas.

the diversification of national food production and trade partners and stopping speculation on food.

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Global Partnerships | Recommendation

In 2030, we want a world where significant challenges posed by COVID-19 and the mental health crises are addressed through investments in innovative solutions (e. g. digital health), to improve health equity, accessibility, and security for young people everywhere.

3.2 As per SDGs 3 and 17, by 2025, extend financial commitment with increases in non-earmarked funding of G7 members to the World Health Organization (WHO) to a minimum of six years, contributing to WHO programming stability, longer-term investments including early warning systems, and a safer world for all. G7 leaders must strengthen partnerships through country-specific global health diplomacy units, with consistent and diverse youth representation. 3.3 As per SDG 3.4, improve the provision of support services in order to address growing challenges on mental health from particular crises, including climate anxiety and COVID-19. Services should be universal, accessible, effective and affordable across educational institutions, workplaces and the community. National requirements outlining standards for the provision of mental health education from the age of seven, coupled with national campaigns and training for universities and employers, to address structural causes and prevent discrimination.

3.1 As per SDGs 1.5, 3, 9.1.1, and 17, deploy the advancement of digital health solutions for young people through the means of strategic partnerships and investments to close digital education and infrastructure gaps amongst nations. Implement accessible and secure electronic medical records systems and telemedicine advancements within each country, and encourage progression in remote monitoring system integration that upholds patient confidentiality through strict cybersecurity practices.

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TRACK 5

YOUTH, PEACE & SECURITY All G7 countries should lead by example in the implementation of UN Security Council Resolutions 2250 (2015), 2419 (2018) and 2535 (2020), together building the Youth, Peace and Security (YPS) agenda. More than the recognition of young people’s important contributions to peace, concrete actions towards implementing and financing the YPS pillars must be prioritised domestically and internationally.

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Therefore, we recommend the following:

Institutionalisation of YPS | Recommendation

Participation | Recommendation Improve youth participation in formal and informal peace and democratic processes by (a) reorognising the political agency of young people in their diversity and the urgency of their leadership, (b) committing to countering intersectional forms of young people’s political and social exclusion, (c) ensuring that young people are meaningfully included in all stages of peace-building processes, including in delegations to formal negotiations and humanitarian responses, and (d) urging national, regional and international stakeholders to better engage youth organisations through partnerships for collaborative decision-making. Youth facing Violence | Recommendation To guarantee protection and (re-)integration, (a) ensure access to basic needs and healthcare of conflict-affected youth, especially reproductive health and other services in response to gender-based violence, (b) provide free trauma-informed and accessible mental health services, and (c) challenge perceptions of youth as threats via policing, justice, refugee and immigration policies. Such policies should be democratised and focus on human security, promote the rights of refugee and asylum- seeking youth, and invest in their meaningful integration.

Under co-leadership of youth organisations, develop national strategies and mechanisms on YPS with (a) clear indicators, (b) a dedicated budget, including sustainable financing, (c) participation and follow-up mechanisms, and (d) high-level YPS focal point(s) with cross- governmental mandates. Action against global conflict and war | Recommendation In every conflict, support should be provided to young people. In recognition of the war in Ukraine, contextually-relevant actions should include (a) protecting young people, especially soldiers, activists, and those engaged in information gathering, humanitarian and medical aid, (b) ensuring mental health support, (c) financing young humanitarian volunteers, human rights activists and youth organisations through (1) capacity-building, (2) partnerships with international, humanitarian and peace- building organisations, and (3) sustainable funding streams including the expansion of existing exchange mechanisms, and (e) specifically in the Ukrainian war, support (1) the National Youth Council of Ukraine and its member organisations (2) carry out the repatriation process of forcefully deported children and youth. Give the importance of youth in every country, each conflict should receive equal amounts of attention and foresee a contextually relevant response.

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Track Sherpas

Hannah Schartmann Anne Steuernagel

Felix Kaminski Jonas Dechent Ruszlan Biwoino Franka Weckner

Lisa Mastiaux

Eva Croon

Katrina Leclerc

Paul Klahre

Co-Chairs Carolina Claus

Benjamin Günther

‘WE STAND FOR INCLUSIVE, DIVERSE, AND BARRIER-FREE YOUTH PARTICIPATION THAT ENSURES ALL YOUNG PEOPLE ARE HEARD AND RECOGNISED.’

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SIGNATORIES

Track 1 | Sustainable & Green Planet

Jaya Scott, Canada Cécile Génot, France Nanami Okiyama, Japan

Jannis Krüßmann, Germany

Aurora Audino, Italy

Annabel Rice, United Kingdom Rosalind Skillen, European Union Mahfou Aidara, Senegal Yuliia Kotelnikova, Ukraine

Jordan Lee, USA

Amira Bilqis, Indonesia

Hannah Hopper, South Africa

Track 2 | Economic Transformation for Shared Progress Michael Lecchino, Canada Işılay Işılar-Günes, Germany Pablo Gil, France Tea Cimini, Italy Junki Fujii, Japan Michael Yip, United Kingdom Daniella Torres, USA Josias Knöppler, European Union Radhiyan Pribadi, Indonesia Ghislaine Dioh, Senegal Oshea Roopnarian, South Africa Kateryna Davydkova, Ukraine Track 3 | Resilience of Democracies Hargun Kaur, Canada Johannes Röder, Germany Guillaume Ménard, France Emanuele Sacco, Italy Erina Kondo, Japan Safia Sangster, United Kingdom David Pham, USA Nicholas Moulios, European Union Anak Agung Mia Intentilia, Indonesia Hane Marie Faye, Senegal Keitumetse Pule, South Africa Natalia Shevchuk, Ukraine Track 4 | Global Health & Solidarity Prativa Baral, Canada Antonia Kuhn, Germany Mathilde Viart, France Alessio Laconi, Italy Juli Sakar, Japan Zain Iqbal, United Kingdom Aisha Espey, USA Jessica Antonisse, European Union Raihan Ariatama, Indonesia Aissatou Ndiaye, Senegal Sicelo Shange, South Africa Yevheniya Danylyuk, Ukraine Track | Youth, Peace & Security Jaya Scott, Canada Antonia Kuhn, Germany Mathilde Viart, France Tea Cimini, Italy Juli Sarkar, Japan Safia Sangster, United Kingdom Aisha Espey, USA Nikolaos Moulios, European Union Anak Agung Mia Intentilia, Indonesia Keitumetse Pule, South Africa Natalia Shevchuk, Ukraine

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Coordinated by

In Coorporation with

Funded by

Berlin 18 May 2022

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