CanyonPT.Determining the Origins of Your Pain

KNOW YOUR PAIN TO OWN YOUR PAIN DETERMINING THE ORIGIN OF YOUR PAIN Sometimes it happens when a pain develops that you can immediately identify the cause. A new pair of shoes may cause a sharp pain in your heel, or an old chair at work may cause your back to grow sore and uncomfortable as time goes on. But there are other situations in which pain develops, and the cause of the pain is unclear. Different types of bodily pain can tell you different things about your body and overall bodily health. Sometimes, a pain in your arm or your leg may have little to nothing to do with an actual issue in your arm or leg. Physical therapists are like well-trained detectives when it comes to identifying the causes of pain. A physical therapist knows the way that the nervous system works, making it possible to identify the potential causes of pain, even if the pain is manifesting itself in an unusual or seemingly inexplicable way. Whether you are suffering from pain in your head, your back, your neck or anywhere else in your body, working with a physical therapist can help you find the relief you are looking for. Physical therapists are trained in identifying and treating the cause of your pain, giving you the opportunity to shift away from the ongoing use of pain medication and instead find relief from your pain with a series of strategies that include stretching, muscle building and flexibility training.

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Understanding YOUR PAIN

When you meet with a physical therapist to understand where your pain may be coming from, one of the first things you’ll do is have a conversation about your pain. How long you’ve been experiencing pain, where it developed and how the pain manifests itself are all very important distinctions that can help shed some light on what may be causing your discomfort. HERE ARE A FEW THINGS YOU MAY WANT TO CONSIDER BEFORE HEADING INTO PHYSICAL THERAPY: • Consider exactly where the pain occurs in your body, and research what the different parts of the body are called so that you can have an accurate and helpful conversation about your pain. For example, back pain has a lot of different differentiations, and lumbar pain (which is in the lower back) is frequently caused by factors different from what would cause upper-back or neck pain. • How does the pain feel when it develops? Is it a lingering ache? Is it a sharp stab? Is it more of a tingling feeling? Each of these sensations are actually associated with different types of problems, so describing your pain appropriately may be helpful in determining the best treatment methods for your body’s needs. • What do you think may be causing the pain? Of course, it happens that a pain will develop, and you are dumbfounded as to why, but more often than not, there is something that you think could be influencing it. If the pain started around the same time as a change in environment or life circumstances, then it is worth telling your physical therapist about the association. Another thing to consider about your pain is whether or not it develops at particular times of the day or year. There are plenty of situations when someone begins to experience pain when the weather starts to change, and it turns out that the pain is a result of arthritis and inflammation. There are other situations in which the pain will develop as a result of prolonged sitting or the opposite — such as when things get crazy at home or at work, and you find that you are not getting as much sleep as usual. Considering any changes in your daily habits or environmental factors can be very helpful in determining what is causing your pain.

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Regardless of where your pain is, how long you’ve been dealing with it, or how intense the pain feels, the smart thing to do when pain develops is to speak with a physical therapist. Working with a physical therapist can help you finally get a step ahead of your pain, finding treatment options that are designed to provide you with long-term relief instead of temporary relief from medication. For more information about physical therapy for overcoming bodily pain, contact us today! Contact your physical therapist today by calling (801) 944-1209 or schedule your consult by visiting canyonsportstherapy.com !

INTRODUCING THE NEWEST MEMBER OF OUR TEAM!

Ryan Petersen, DPT, CSCS has joined Canyon Sports Therapy and is looking forward to helping you reach your physical therapy goals.

FOLLOW US TODAY! Follow us on social media to stay up to date with Canyon Sports Therapy! Left: This is what Ryan really looks like. Right: This is the Ryan you will see in the clinic!

@canyonsportstherapyut @canyonsportstherapyut @canyonsportstherapy

TIPS FOR RUNNING WITH PLANTAR FASCIITIS

It is possible to begin incorporating running into your fitness routine, even if you already have mild to moderate plantar fasciitis. Start out by walking, and begin incorporating intervals of jogging or running. Rest a few days between your runs to make sure your feet have enough time to recover, and slowly increase the duration of your running intervals until you are jogging more than walking. Here are a couple tips to incorporate into your running if you have plantar fasciitis: • Warm up thoroughly before you run. A typical running warm up should include exercises to “wake up” your hip flexors and legs – such as lunges, squats, and leg swings. However, when you have plantar fasciitis you need to pay special attention to your ankles, calves, and plantar fascia ligament during your warm up. • Ice After Your Workout. If you anticipate you will be struggling with heel pain after a run, try elevating and icing your feet after your cool down. Ice for 10-15 minutes after your run, and again in the evening if you are experiencing heel pain. There are a variety of ways you can ice your feet. Try using Ice Therapy Slippers, or fill a bucket with ice water and submerge your feet. Some people will also hold a bag of frozen peas to the bottom of their foot. •Running shouldmake you feel healthier, not put you in excruciating pain. If you have mild plantar fasciitis, make sure you take special care of your feet and listen to your body. If you have severe plantar fasciitis or at any point your pain becomes severe, refrain from running until you consult your physical therapist for medical advice. READY TO GET STARTED? At Canyon Sports Therapy, we want your summer to be fun, exciting, and pain free! Call us today to schedule a consultation or speak with one of our licensed physical therapists.

See what results await you! Call us today at (801) 944-1209 or visit our website at canyonsportstherapy.com

EXERCISE ESSENTIALS A N E X E R C I S E T O S T R E N G T H E N CO R E MU S C L E S

CURL UP Lie on back with one leg straight. The other leg is bent with the foot flat on the ground. Position your hands underneath your lower back. Tuck your chin and lift your shoulder blades off the ground slightly. Return to the start position in a controlled manner. Repeat 20 times.

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Always consult your physical therapist or physician before starting exercises you are unsure of doing.

HEALTHY RECIPE FETA CHICKEN BURGERS

INGREDIENTS

• 1/4 cup finely chopped cucumber • 1/4 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise • 1/2 cup chopped roasted sweet red pepper • 1 teaspoon garlic powder • 1/2 teaspoon Greek seasoning • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

• 1-1/2 pounds lean ground chicken • 1 cup crumbled feta cheese • 6 whole wheat hamburger buns, split and toasted • Optional: Lettuce leaves and tomato slices

INSTRUCTIONS Preheat broiler. Mix cucumber and mayonnaise. For burgers, mix red pepper and seasonings. Add chicken and cheese; mix lightly but thoroughly (mixture will be sticky). Shape into six 1/2-in.-thick patties. Broil burgers 4 in. from heat until a thermometer reads 165°, 3-4 minutes per side. Serve in buns with cucumber sauce. If desired, top with lettuce and tomato. FOLLOW US TODAY! Follow us on social media to stay up to date with Canyon Sports Therapy! @canyonsportstherapyut @canyonsportstherapyut @canyons

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