Soto Law Group - September 2020

The Soto Law Group 1101 Dove Street Suite 200 Newport Beach, CA 92660

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

949-945-0059 TheSotoLawGroup.com

INSIDE THIS ISSUE From the Desk of DeDe PAGE 1 Is Grit the Key Ingredient to a Resilient Business? PAGE 1 2 Steps to Cultivate Leadership in Your Sales Team PAGE 2 Shop Online for Your Kids Like a Pro PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Balsamic Marinated Flank Steak PAGE 3 Is Stress Making You Forgetful? PAGE 4

Is Stress Harming Your Memory? HOWTO COPEWITHDAILY TRIGGERS

Stress can cause more than just a bad mood and low energy. Over time, mental exhaustion from stress can lead to forgetfulness and reduced cognition. This can hamper your ability to do your job and enjoy life. Though stress is unavoidable, there are steps you can take to mitigate some of the negative effects of mental exhaustion, including forgetfulness. First, consider the source of your stress. These days, a common stressor is social media. If your feeds are full of bad news and negativity, shut them down. Many researchers suggest that spending less time on the internet leads to better health. Several studies have found that constant internet use, including time spent on social media, is negatively impacting our memories. Research from Harvard, Oxford, King’s College London, andWestern Sydney University all confirm this: Too much internet use is a bad thing.

Of course, it can be easier to delete a social media app than it is to eliminate other types of stressors. Coping with a stressful coworker, for example, can be difficult. You have to figure out why they’re causing you stress and how the situation can be remedied. Dealing with a work-related confrontation can be hard, but having that difficult conversation and resolving the problem can ultimately lead to less long- term stress and improve your mental health. Another thing you can do to reduce stress is avoid multitasking. Taking on multiple projects or doing too much in too little time can leave you feeling overworked. Plus, studies have found that multitasking is not effective. You cannot deliver the same results when your attention is scattered as you can when you are focused on one thing. To make matters worse, multitasking takes a major toll on memory and cognition, according to a study from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

If stress is impairing your memory, judgment, or cognition, take the above steps to reduce it. If you find your memory and cognition aren’t improving, consider speaking with a mental health professional to discuss your best next steps. Mental health and stress management are important, and the more we do to improve these areas of our lives, the healthier and happier we will be.

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