Rinehardt Law - September 2019

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

2404 Park Ave. W., Mansfield, Ohio 44906 419-LAW-2020 www.rinehardtlawfirm.com

INSIDE THIS EDITION

1 2

Back to School and Back in the Game

Honoring the Canines of 9/11 Employee Spotlight Tools for Effective Time Management

3 4

Classic Apple Crisp

Crazy Homes Not Built by Architects

Designed by Their Owners THE WORLD’S WACKIEST HOMES It doesn’t always take a master architect to

includes 15 platforms, four greenhouses, a guest house, an art workshop, and more.

the Rings.” In fact, Grant built it over 15 years before the first movie was released. Still, it’s hard not to imagine some magical creature taking up residence in this house, which appears to be an extension of the forest itself. Gnarled tree trunks frame a circular door, moss coats the roof, and ivy covers most of the walls, all belying a cozy interior fit for many a hobbit meal or dwarf song. These homes may not be for everyone, but that’s kind of the point. Each of these homes was built by a specific resident, for a specific resident. Still, you can’t help but be impressed by the determination of their owners to make something truly one of a kind.

create a breathtaking home. Some homeowners have shunned suburban domiciles and, with a little artistic vision and a lot of determination, built homes that capture their identities. Quirky, meticulously constructed, and always unique, here are a few of the world’s wackiest homes designed, and sometimes built, by their owners. Freedom Cove, British Columbia, Canada When someone says they live on the water, they probably don’t mean they actually live on the water. But for artists Wayne Adams and Catherine King, the statement is literal. Freedom Cove, their remote, magenta-green island home, floats in Clayoquot Sound near Vancouver Island. They started building it from old, interlocking steel docks in 1991, and now it

Bat Casa, San Miguel, Mexico The best word to describe this home is probably “anatomical.” That’s certainly the aesthetic movie set designer and Bat Casa resident Steve Rood was going for. The staircase looks like human vertebrae, skeletal hands act as towel hooks in the bathroom, and tendril-like fixtures surround the living room couch. Perhaps the most out-of- character addition to the house is a large mural of the bat symbol painted on the garage door, which is the origin of the property’s name. Hobbit House, Inverness-Shire, Scotland Surprisingly, Stuart Grant’s cozy forest cottage was not inspired by the hobbit holes of “Lord of

4

Rinehardt Law | www.rinehardtlawfirm.com

www.rinehardtlawfirm.com

Made with FlippingBook - Online catalogs