Fritz PT_Arthritis Pain Relief

Health & Wellness The Newsletter About Your Health And Caring For Your Body

Osteoarthritis is a Pain! Physical Therapy Can Help As we all age, our bodies experience a certain “wear and tear” on cartilage and joints. This can cause inflammation and pain, known as arthritis. According to the American Arthritis Foundation, Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, making itself apparent in people as they age. It can certainly take a toll on one’s body, resulting in achy or painful joints after exercise, after a long day on one’s feet, or even after prolonged periods of inactivity, thus causing joints to constrict. The most common areas of Osteoarthritis are found in the fingers, hips, knees, and spine. These are all joints that we use excessively, even in our daily lives. Just think - by the time you lift yourself out of bed, shower, brush your teeth, eat breakfast, and prepare to begin your day, you’ve already used these joints a multitude of times. Therefore, it isn’t surprising that pain can occur in them over time. If you believe you may be experiencing Osteoarthritis, give one of our physical therapists a call today to discuss pain relief. Why Do We Experience Osteoarthritis? While it is true that Osteoarthritis is most common in older folks, that is not always necessarily the case. It is possible that Osteoarthritis can present itself in younger adults, especially if they are prone to weak joints, poor dieting, or if they aren’t very active. Your cartilage works hard to protect your joints by absorbing the natural shocks that your body experiences on a daily basis. Therefore, much of your likelihood regarding Osteoarthritis is dependent upon the physical and nutritional lifestyles you partake in. Joint alignment can alter and the muscles around a joint can weaken over time, causing the cartilage to shift or thin. As cartilage wears down, Osteoarthritis becomes much more common.

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The most common symptoms are: •Joint pain. •Swelling or tenderness in or around the joint(s). •Inflammation or flare-ups of pain in the joint(s) after use. • Feeling stiff after sitting or laying down for prolonged periods of time, especially when getting up in the morning. • Crepitus - also referred to as a “cracking or crunching” feeling when moving the joint(s), or the sound of bone rubbing on bone. How can physical therapy help Osteoar thritis? According to the American Occupational Therapy Association, 1 in 5 adults are diagnosed with arthritis annually. Physical therapy is the most common treatment for Osteoarthritis, usually helping with the relief of joint pain in just a few sessions. If you have arthritis, don’t fret - there is Physical Therapy & Osteoarthritis

hope! While anti-inflammatory and pain medications will help for the time being, they are very much a short-term solution. Physical therapy can help in actually strengthening your joints and muscles once again, allowing for a much healthier and long-term pain relief solution. Our physical therapists are trained to help you with joint alignment, stability, muscle regeneration, and most importantly, pain relief. They are dedicated to helping you get back to your normal levels of mobility. Don’t settle for a life of aches and pains - physical therapy can get you back on your feet and doing the activities you used to love! If you are suffering from Osteoarthritis, give us a call today - we can get you back to living your best, most pain-free life. Sources: https://www.aota.org/~/media/Corporate/Files/ AboutOT/Professionals/WhatIsOT/PA/Facts/Arthritis%20 fact%20sheet.pdf https://www.arthritis.org/

PATIENT SUCCESS SPOTLIGHTS

Linda came to us because her knee was giving way and she was in pain. Now she graduates with no pain at all and she feels stronger than ever! “I enjoyed coming to PT because everyone is so friendly and helpful. I feel stronger than when I started and certainly don’t have any pain. Thanks for the help!”

“I am able to run and work out with more ease than before I started PT.” - K. Nelson

HEALTHY RECIPE: BROCCOLI-CHEDDAR QUICHE

INGREDIENTS: • 1 (9 in) frozen whole-wheat pie crust shell • 1 (8 oz) package broccoli florets • 1 ½ tsp olive oil • 1 cup chopped sweet onion • 4 large eggs • ½ cup evaporated milk • 3 oz sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded

• ¾ tsp kosher salt • ¼ tsp black pepper DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Let pie crust thaw at room temperature 10 minutes. Place in preheated oven, and bake until lightly browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly, about 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F. Cook broccoli according to package directions, until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes. Coarsely chop larger pieces. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high; add onion and cook until light golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Whisk together eggs and evaporated milk in a medium bowl. Stir in broccoli, onion, cheese, salt and black pepper. Pour mixture into prepared pie crust. Bake at 375 degrees F until just set and edges are golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. Source: http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/275920/make-ahead-broccoli-cheddar-quiche

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Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) Has your mood darkened with the shorter days and longer nights of fall and winter? If you’re like many people, getting less sunshine and being less active this time of year can contribute to feelings of sadness and apathy that may be associated with Seasonal Affective Disorder (or SAD). The good news is that regular exercise can help boost your mood and guard against symptoms of seasonal affective disorder. exercise outside after sunrise or before sundown. • Get outside to walk, jog, run, snowshoe, or cross country ski. The exposure to sunlight can help increase your vitamin D levels and elevate your mood. • Enlist the services of a personal fitness trainer. Many people find meeting with a personal fitness trainer helps them stick with their exercise routine. Personal fitness trainers also can help vary workouts to keep them interesting and effective

EXERCISE AND SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, 14 percent of people in the United States experience SAD (also known as seasonal depression). But research shows that many people can manage or avoid SAD with 30 to 60 minutes of exercise and 20 minutes of exposure to sunlight each day. In addition, data show exercisers have lower rates of recurrent depression compared with study participants who do not exercise. These figures emphasize the importance of exercising throughout the winter, especially if your goal is health and well-being as well as a trim waistline. Try the tips for maintaining your winter exercise routine this winter: • Arrange your schedule to start and end later or earlier so that you can

GET PROFESSIONAL HELP FOR SAD IF YOU NEED IT Although lack of sunlight and activity often are culprits of seasonal affective disorder, genetics and hormonal changes also may contribute to the condition. If exercise alone doesn’t improve your mood and your sadness persists for more than 2 weeks, schedule an appointment with one of our physiotherapists. We will provide you with techniques in addition to exercise to manage stress. References: Rosen LN, Targum SD, Terman M. Prevalence of seasonal affective disorder at four latitudes. Psych Res. 1990. 31;131-144. Rosenthal NE. Winter blues: everything you need to know to beat seasonal affective disorder. New York, NY: Guilford Press; 2006. Blumenthal JA, Babyak MA, Doraiswamy PM, et al. Exercise and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Psychosom Med. 2007;69(7):587-96. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention. CDC Features. Insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic. www.cdc.gov/features/dssleep/. Accessed November 1, 2016. Centers for disease Control and Prevention. Alcohol and Public Health. Frequently asked questions. http://www.cdc.gov/ alcohol/faqs.htm. Accessed November 1, 2016.

Exercise Essentials Try this simple exercise to help you feel better...

Helps With Arthritis Pain

STRAIGHT LEG RAISE While lying or sitting, raise up your leg with a straight knee and your toes pointed upward. Hold for 10 seconds then repeat 6 times on both legs.

Exercises copyright of

The above exercise is designed to be performed under the instruction of a licensed physical therapist. No Doctor Referral Necessary Whether you want to come in for a check-up, suffered a recent injury or you want to improve your health, a doctor referral is not needed. In the state of Pennsylvania you have direct access to chiropractic care and physical therapy! www.simpleset.net

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