Excel PT: Pelvic Floor

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LEARN ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF PELVIC FLOOR PHYSICAL THERAPY

floor, which could lead to tension, weakness, and motor control impairments. If you are currently pregnant, that is often the best time to see a pelvic floor physical therapist. You then have the opportunity to not only learn how to use your pelvic floor as your body changes and grows, but also how to effectively use your pelvic floor during labor and delivery. This can help reduce the risk of tearing and post-partum related issues like incontinence and pain. Having a baby is beautiful and joyous, but physically demanding! A pelvic floor physical therapist can help you prepare for the changes and rehabilitate your body so you can be at your best for your baby!

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These muscles also help to stabilize the pelvis, working with your abdominal muscles, back muscles, and diaphragm to make up your core. For proper functioning of the pelvic floor, it is important to have:

By Samantha Fazio, PT, DPT

Strength: •To stabilize the pelvis and prevent hip, low back and pelvic pain •To prevent leakage of urine or stool with increases in abdominal pressure, such as with sneezing, coughing, squatting, or jumping Endurance: •To maintain proper spine posture and stabilize the pelvis over longer periods of time and with longer physical activity Flexibility: •To relax and stretch for bearing down when trying to urinate, defecate, or during childbirth •To promote pelvic mobility for dynamic activities, such as walking, running or stair climbing Motor control: •To allow you full control of when you urinate, defecate or flatulate •To prevent painful conditions of the hip, low back and pelvis Does everyone have a pelvic floor? Yes! All people, regardless of gender, have pelvises and therefore have pelvic floor muscles. Should pregnant or postpartum women have pelvic floor physical therapy? Absolutely! Whether you’ve delivered vaginally or through a Cesarean section, being pregnant for 40 weeks puts a lot of pressure on the pelvic

Common Misconceptions: “I do kegels so I don’t need pelvic floor physical therapy!”

•Kegel is the term for pelvic floor contractions, named after the person who studied the effects of strengthening the pelvic floor. While kegels can be a very helpful tool in pelvic floor rehab, strengthening is not always the answer for incontinence. Sometimes incontinence can be caused by muscles that are too tight or too contracted. If the muscles are always contracted or “on” then contracting them further will just lead to more tightness, more fatigue, and more leakage. Plus, studies have shown that most people do kegels incorrectly! A pelvic floor physical therapist will help you determine if kegels are right for you! “I don’t plan on having a baby and I’ve never had a baby so I don’t need pelvic floor physical therapy!” •Women are not the only people that have pelvic floors. Still, pelvic floor dysfunction can arise in women even if they have not had children. There are common diagnoses which can be treated with pelvic floor physical therapy.

“Men don’t have pelvic floor problems!”

•There is a very high prevalence of prostate problems in older men. Because of this, men are particularly susceptible to pelvic floor issues such as incontinence or difficulty voiding. There are some common diagnoses which can be treated by a pelvic floor physical therapist.

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PENNSYLVANIA ALLOWS DIRECT ACCESS TO PHYSICAL THERAPY WITHOUT A PHYSICIAN REFERRAL CONTACT US TODAY TO LEARN IF YOUR INSURANCE CARRIER COVERS THIS SERVICE

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