2020 At A Glance

OKLAHOMA CITY GREATER

AT A GLANCE

123 Park Avenue | Oklahoma City, OK 73102 | 405.297.8900 | www.greateroklahomacity.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS Location..................................... 4 Climate........................................ 7 Population................................. 8 Transportation....................... 10 Housing.....................................13

Economy...................................14 Education..................................18 Income......................................22 Labor Analysis.......................23 Commercial Real Estate.....25

Tax Rates..................................26 Utilities......................................27 Incentives.................................28 Local Services........................32

Best Large Cities to Start a Business.

-WalletHub, 2017, 2018 & 2019

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GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY:

With the second-lowest cost of living of any major metropolitan area balanced with high wages and one of the best places to start a business for the third year in a row, the Greater Oklahoma City area remains one of the best places to live, work and play. The list of reasons you should build your business in our region is growing – almost as quickly as the list of reasons why people love living here. In Greater Oklahoma City, we understand that partnership among business, government and civic leaders

is integral to our success. Our low costs, diverse economy and business-friendly environment have kept the economic doldrums at bay, and provided value, stability and profitability to our companies – and now we’re poised to do even more. Let us introduce you to the thriving 10-county region that is Greater Oklahoma City: a region that has rediscovered its strengths – and redefined itself for the future.

“ TOP 10 CITIES WITH THE YOUNGEST ENTREPRENUERS. - LENDING TREE

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LOCATION

The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) includes seven counties: Oklahoma, Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, and McClain. Oklahoma City is the 25th-largest city and 41st-largest metropolitan area in the United States. The Greater Oklahoma City Partnership region extends to include three additional counties — Kingfisher, Payne and Pottawatomie —to provide a broad economic development area.

CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY AREA: 621 square miles - the third largest geographic area for a city in the nation.

1,500 miles

1,000 miles

OKLAHOMA CITY MSA: 5,581 square miles

THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION: 7,978 square miles OKLAHOMA CITY ELEVATION: 1,285 feet above sea level

500 miles

POPULATION BY RADIUS:

500 miles- 55,226,460 1,000 miles- 178,159,849 1,500 miles- 319,684,689

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, City of OKC

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THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION E GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY GION

Stillwater

Yale

Hennessey

PAYNE

Cushing

Perkins

Crescent

KINGFISHER

LOGAN

Langston

Guthrie

Kingfisher

§¨¦ 35

Chandler

§¨¦ 44

Edmond

Luther

LINCOLN

Kilpatrick Turnpike

CANADIAN OKLAHOMA Jones

El Reno

§¨¦ 40

Spencer

Yukon

Choctaw

§¨¦ 235 

Harrah

Prague

Midwest City

Oklahoma City

McLoud

Tinker AFB

Mustang

Union City

§¨¦ 240

Will Rogers World Airport

§¨¦ 40

Moore

CLEVELAND

Shawnee

Minco

Bethel Acres

Tuttle

Tecumseh

Pink

Newcastle

Norman

Lake Thunderbird

§¨¦ 44

Noble

Goldsby

§¨¦ 35

Slaughterville

Chickasha

GRADY

Lexington

Ninnekah

MCCLAIN

<5,000 5,000 - 10,000 >10,000 POPULATION LEGEND <5,000 5,000 - 10,000 11,000 - 20, POPULATION LEGEND

Rush Springs

21,000 - 5 ,000 51,000 - 100,000 >100,000

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REGIONAL COMMUTER PATTERNS This map shows the 10-county Partnership region and the commuting pattern between each county. The number listed in the county is the percentage of residents who stay in their home county to work. The lines

between counties show the percentage of residents who travel to other counties to work. For the purpose of clarity, only commuter flows of 5% and above are pictured below.

PAYNE 76%

KINGFISHER 58%

LOGAN 23%

16%

11%

26%

63%

7%

LINCOLN 33%

CANADIAN 24%

OKLAHOMA 86%

34%

66%

5%

6%

13%

7%

6%

31%

38%

53%

POTTAWATOMIE 54%

42%

CLEVELAND 40%

10%

7%

GRADY 37%

24%

MCCLAIN 25%

SOURCE: LEHD, 2017

From

To

Canadian Cleveland Grady

Kingfisher Lincoln Logan McClain Oklahoma Payne Pottawatomie Outside of region

Canadian Cleveland

13,316 3,305

480

464 124

115 271 337 36,466 337 148 229 2,069 53,867 718

463

6,714

2,268 40,590 518 1,034 1,699 6,435

1,407

13,062

Grady

94

44

81 969

6,689 140

204

4,347 1,798 2,248 2,567 2,726

Kingfisher

347 193 420 367

164 504 719

53 69 48

2,950

11 120 27

1,320

88

41

Lincoln Logan McClain

43

3,274 78

42

3,369 1,082 1,328

185

76 3,604 69

10,056 598

149 152

3,011

391

54

29

43 3,095 5,235

81

Oklahoma

9,440 19,916 974

629

652 2,136 1,262 246,786 2,332 2,380

34,279

Payne

316 418

744

53 73

91 53

325 239 71 494 71 164 1,529 1,222 2,530

3,719 18,046 6,923 377 64,205 10,555

278

8,820 4,731

Pottawatomie

1,598

11,976

Outside of Region

5,800

12,645

3,081

1,865

5,064

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CLIMATE The average annual temperature is 61° F (high 72°, low 51°) with an average rainfall of 37.6 inches and average snowfall of 7.6 inches per year. The average number of flying days is 350 per year – the same number of days you’ll see the sun shining in Oklahoma City.

AVERAGE LOW - HIGH

Jan.........29° - 50° Feb........33° - 55° Mar.........41° - 63° April......50° - 72° May........60° - 80° June......68° - 88°

July........72° - 94° Aug........71° - 93° Sep........63° - 85° Oct.........52° - 73° Nov........40° - 62° Dec........31° - 51°

WEATHER ANNUAL AVERAGES

Clear / partly cloudy days................... 235 Rainy days*................................................. 82 Precipitation.............................. 37.6 inches Snowfall..........................................7.6 inches Wind speed..................................... 11.4 mph

SOURCE: NOAA, COMPARATIVE CLIMATE DATA, 30 YEAR AVERAGE * ANY PRECIPITATION EXCEEDING 0.01 INCHES

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REGIONAL COMMUNITY POPULATION

City

2019 Population

Percent Growth 2010-2019

Bethany

20,443 16,075 12,433 93,840 17,739 10,721 58,506 62,736 19,393 125,369 671,100 30,982 50,032 10,793 25,027

7.44% 0.24% 11.55% 15.28% 5.91% 5.20% 7.61% 13.89% 11.49% 13.02% 15.69% 3.77% 9.51% 7.47% 10.20%

Chickasha Choctaw Edmond El Reno

Guthrie

Midwest City

Moore

Mustang Norman

Oklahoma City

Shawnee Stillwater Warr Acres

Yukon

Source: ESRI BUSINESS ANALYST, 2019 (populations over 10,000)

Oklahoma City is the most populous city in the state of Oklahoma. From 2010 to 2019, Oklahoma City’s metro population grew by nearly 13% and has experienced a 1.37% average annual growth rate. In 2019, the Oklahoma City MSA population was estimated to be 1,420,798 while the city of Oklahoma City’s population was 671,100. Between 2010 and 2015, the Oklahoma City MSA was the 10th-fastest-growing large metro (over 1 million population) in the country and has grown nearly twice as fast as the nation. POPULATION

2019 POPULATION BY ETHNIC GROUP & RACE % White % Black

% American Indian % Asian % Hispanic Origin***

Oklahoma City

60% 61% 69% 70% 69% 70%

15% 16% 11% 10%

4% 3% 4% 5% 9%

5% 4% 4% 3% 2% 6%

21% 18% 14% 13% 11% 19%

Oklahoma County, OK

OKC MSA*

Greater OKC**

Oklahoma

8%

USA

13%

1%

*OKC MSA includes the 7-county metro: Oklahoma, Cleveland, Canadian, Grady, Lincoln, Logan and McClain counties **Greater OKC includes the 10-county region: Oklahoma, Cleveland, Canadian, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Payne, Pottawatomie, & Kingfisher counties ***Persons of Hispanic Origin may be of any race, which may cause area total to not equal 100% Source: Esri Business Analyst, 2019; U.S. Census

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SINCE 2010, THE OKC POPULATION HAS GROWN TWICE AS FAST AS THE NATION.

Population Totals

Population Annual Growth Rates

2010 Total Population (U.S. Census)

2019 Total Population (Esri)

2024 Total Population (Esri)

2010-2019 Population: Annual Growth Rate (Esri)

2019-2024 Population: Annual Growth Rate (Esri)

Oklahoma City

579,999 718,633 1,252,987 1,414,813 3,751,351

671,100 804,431 1,420,798 1,593,199 4,031,351

715,063 846,431

1.59% 1.23% 1.37% 1.29% 0.78% 0.80%

1.28% 1.03% 1.17% 1.11% 0.61% 0.77%

Oklahoma County

OKC MSA*

1,506,137 1,683,440 4,157,210

Greater OKC**

Oklahoma

USA

308,745,538 330,088,686 343,954,683

Source: Esri Business Analyst, 2019; U.S. Census

REGIONAL COUNTY POPULATION

Population % Growth

Population Annual Growth Rates

Population Totals

2000-2010 Population Annual Compound Growth Rate (U.S. Census)

2019-2024 Population: Annual Growth Rate (Esri)

2010 Total Population (U.S. Census)

2019 Total Population (Esri)

2024 Total Population (Esri) 156,633 311,232 59,028 16,529 37,294 49,995 45,126 846,829 86,424

Population % Growth (2010-2019)

2010-2019 Population: Annual Growth Rate (Esri)

Region

Canadian County Cleveland County

115,541

142,432

23.27% 2.80%

2.29% 1.44% 0.89% 0.74% 0.67% 1.31% 2.01% 1.23% 0.82%

1.92% 1.29% 0.74% 0.54% 0.46% 1.16% 1.70% 1.03% 0.71%

255,755 291,931

14.14% 8.51% 7.04% 6.35% 12.76% 20.18%

2.09% 1.42% 0.77% 0.66% 2.12% 2.21%

Grady County

52,431 15,034 34,273 41,848 34,506

56,894 16,092 36,451 47,188

Kingfisher County Lincoln County Logan County McClain County

41,471

Oklahoma County 718,633 804,431

11.94% 0.85%

Payne County Pottawatomie County

77,350 83,423

7.85%

1.27%

69,442

72,886

74,350

4.96%

0.58%

0.52%

0.40%

*OKC MSA includes the 7-county metro: Oklahoma, Cleveland, Canadian, Grady, Lincoln, Logan and McClain counties **Greater OKC includes the 10-county region: Oklahoma, Cleveland, Canadian, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Payne, Pottawatomie, & Kingfisher counties

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TRANSPORTATION Oklahoma City is as easy to reach as it is to navigate, with commute times averaging about 20 minutes or less with minimal congestion. MAJOR HIGHWAYS SERVING AREA:

Interstate 35..........................................North and South Interstate 40.............................................. East and West Interstate 44...............................................Northeast and Southwest Interstate 235................................Connects I-35 & I-40 & U.S. 77 HIGHWAYS The Greater Oklahoma City area has more than 2,400 miles of highways and interstates. The highest concentration being 384 miles of roadway in Oklahoma County where the crossroads of I-35, I-40 and I-44 meet in Oklahoma City. Freight carriers and truck transportation run efficiently on the 646 miles of interstates in the region and minimal congestion.

Interstate 240.................................. Interconnects I-40, I-44 & I-35 U.S. 62................................................ East and Southeast U.S. 77 (Broadway Extension) .............North and South U.S. 270.................................Southeast and Northwest U.S. 277................................................................ Southwest work on multiple turnpikes in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa areas. For the Oklahoma City area, an Eastern Oklahoma County Corridor will be created with 21 miles of new turnpike to connect I-44 to I-40, and the Southwest Kilpatrick Extension will create 7 miles of new roads to connect I-40 to State Highway 152/Airport Road. Airport Road runs just north of Will Rogers World Airport, giving another route to the airport with the Southwest Kilpatrick Extension. 7.5 Miles of the HE Bailey Turnpike near Newcastle widened lanes and enhanced safety have already been completed, and Driving Forward hopes that all projects will be complete in 2021. For more information on the Driving Forward project visit DrivingForwardOK.com . AIR Will Rogers World Airport is the Greater Oklahoma City region’s major commercial airport. In early 2020, the airport has seven airlines, 30 nonstop flights, and about 85 total daily departures. The airport is located a short drive from downtown Oklahoma City with easy access to three major interstates.

Starting in the third quarter of 2016, the $892-million Driving Forward project began

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Will Rogers World Airport sits on more than 8,000 acres of land and provides a wide array of development opportunities. The airport operates on three runways, two 9,800-ft parallel to one another and one 7,800-ft crosswind runway, allowing the airport to accommodate any size aircraft. Will Rogers World Airport recently began an expansion of the airport, adding four new gates, a consolidated security screening area, greeting lobbies and an observational mezzanine. This expansion is scheduled to be completed by April 2021. In addition to Will Rogers World Airport, Stillwater Regional Airport (SWO) offers daily jet service to Dallas Fort/Worth (DFW). With just one connection you can travel to more than 200 domestic and 40 international destinations. The Oklahoma City metro has two reliever airports, Wiley Post Airport and Max Westheimer Airport. Wiley Post Airport is located in Northwest Oklahoma City providing mostly

business aviation. Max Westheimer Airport in Norman, owned by the University of Oklahoma, is mostly used for general aviation. Greater Oklahoma City also boasts several other general aviation airports including Oklahoma City’s Clarence E. Page Airport and the Shawnee Regional Airport. TRAIN Amtrak service is provided via the Heartland Flyer, with service to Fort Worth, Texas. The train departs from the historic Santa Fe Depot at the front door of Bricktown - Oklahoma City’s entertainment district. The Heartland Flyer now offers a bike service for those looking to explore Fort Worth car- free. Two Class I lines provide most of the rail transportation in the Greater Oklahoma City region: Union Pacific and BNSF Railway. These lines have more than 4,000 miles of track and connect Oklahoma communities with other U.S. cities, markets and ports.

DISTANCE AND DELIVERY TIME FROM OKLAHOMA CITY TO MAJOR U.S. CITIES Major Cities Distance (Miles) Delivery (Days) Highway Rail Motor Carrier Rail Atlanta 868 1,006 2 4 Chicago 896 846 2 3 Dallas 200 388 1 7-8 hours Denver 630 792 2 2 Detroit 1,086 1,230 2 4 Houston 437 638 1 1.5 Kansas City 339 379 1 1 Los Angeles 1,367 1,489 2 6 Memphis 474 583 1 2 New Orleans 718 1,000 2 3 New York 1,548 1,592 3 7 St. Louis 462 539 1 1 Seattle 2,021 2,360 3 5

Same Day: Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Denver, Memphis Overnight: Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta, Detroit

SOURCES: UPS, FEDEX, CON-WAY FREIGHT

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NON-STOP AIR SERVICE

Seattle

Philadelphia

New York/Newark

Salt Lake City

Chicago O’Hare

Baltimore

San Francisco

Washington D.C. Dulles

Las Vegas

Denver

Washington D.C.

Los Angeles

St. Louis

Charlotte

Nashville

OKC

Phoenix

Atlanta

Dallas/ Ft. Worth

Houston Hobby

Destin

Houston Inter.

Orlando Sanford

San Antonio

Orlando

Miami

NON-STOP SERVICE Atlanta.......................................................................Delta Baltimore....................................................... Southwest Charlotte Douglas .................................................. American Chicago Midway.......................................... Southwest Chicago O’Hare..............................American, United Dallas/Ft. Worth............................................ American Denver........................... Southwest, United, Frontier Destin................................................................Allegiant* Detroit........................................................................Delta Houston/Hobby.......................................... Southwest Houston/Intercontinental................................ United Las Vegas................................... Allegiant, Southwest Los Angeles.............................. Allegiant*, American Miami................................................................. American

Minneapolis..............................................................Delta Nashville........................................................Southwest* New York/Newark...............................................United Orlando........................................ Frontier, Southwest* Orlando Sanford............................................ Allegiant* Philadelphia......................................................American Phoenix......................................Southwest, American Salt Lake City..........................................................Delta San Antonio......................................................Frontier* San Francisco....................................................... United Seattle..................................................................... Alaska St. Louis.......................................................... Southwest Washington D.C. Dulles.................................... United Washington Reagan.................................. Southwest All flights are subject to change without notice. * Seasonal Service

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This vibrant, active city is even more livable because of its affordability. Unlike many metropolitan areas today, you can afford to live comfortably in a quality home, while still enjoying the area’s arts, entertainment and recreational opportunities. Explore the neighborhoods layered with personality, colorful art enclaves and plenty of clean, green spaces. Learn more about housing in Oklahoma City at abetterlifeokc.com/housing . HOUSING: MOVING TO OKLAHOMA CITY

“ Oklahoma City Ranks No. 2 for Best Cities for First Time Homebuyers. - SmartAsset

The Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER) Cost of Living Index shows that Oklahoma City is 31.2 percent below the national average* in terms of housing costs.

NEW HOME AVERAGE SALES PRICE •$241,727 for 2,400 sq. ft. new-build home AVERAGE RENTAL RATE •$850 per month for 2-bed, 2-bath, 950 sq. ft., unfurnished apartment

AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE •$208,859 (new construction and resale) SOURCE: *C2ER COST OF LIVING INDEX, 2019 ANNUAL AVERAGE; (NATIONAL AVERAGE FOR APPROXIMATELY 270 URBAN AREAS); OKLAHOMA CITY METROPOLITAN ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, AVG HOME SALES FOR 2019.

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ECONOMY MAJOR INDUSTRIES:

• Bioscience: Oklahoma City’s Bioscience presence is generating national and international attention. The sector employs more than 51,000 statewide. Companies within this industry are dedicated to providing Bioscience goods and services, as well as education and research testing. • Energy: Oklahoma City is the Energy capital of the state. Energy accounts for approximately 3% of metro employment but more than

The economy of the Greater Oklahoma City region is diverse. While federal, state and local government are the largest employers and the oil and natural gas sector generates the largest revenues, the area’s major private-sector economic contributors include:

• Aviation & Aerospace: With the largest concentration of aviation and aerospace firms in the state, the Greater Oklahoma City region’s 236 firms employ 36,600 workers – and growing. Nearly 65% of the workforce at Tinker Air Force Base - the largest single-site employer in the state – consists of civilian contractors and service providers.

8% of total compensation. The sector draws its strength from several Energy companies with headquarters in the city.

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR- GREATER OKC REGION

19,000

35,000

80,000

133,000

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#1 EASIEST PLACE IN

NORTH AMERICA TO DO BUSINESS - ASU CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF ECONOMIC LIBERTY

BIOSCIENCE IN OKC The biosciences are big business in

• Wholesale and Retail Trade: Oklahoma City’s central location and accessibility has made it a vital crossroads for commerce. The convergence of I-35, a major north- south interstate, and I-40 and I-44, major east-west interstates, and numerous U.S. and State Highways position Oklahoma City as a major wholesale and retail trade center. For the year 2019, the Oklahoma City MSA had estimated total taxable retail sales of $24.2 billion. • International: The Greater OKC metro area boasts a substantial international presence, with 36 countries represented by foreign- based subsidiaries in the region. More than 40,000 are employed by these companies, which provide a broad range of products and services. AEROSPACE IN OKC The aerospace industry employs more than 36,600 workers in the Greater Oklahoma City region. Read our study on the industry at www.greateroklahomacity.com/industries/ aviation-and-aerospace .

Oklahoma City as the industry employs at least 51,000 statewide. Read more about the industry at www.greateroklahomacity.com/ biotech .

• Health Care: As one of the nation’s major centers of healthcare delivery, the Oklahoma City region employs more than 80,000 health care sector

workers. Our 36 general medical and surgical hospitals and 9 specialized hospitals combine to offer outstanding healthcare. • Manufacturing: This broad category includes metals and machinery; building materials; food products; and medical devices and equipment. With more than 35,000 employed, the manufacturing sector represents approximately 5% of the Greater Oklahoma City’s total nonagricultural labor force. • Professional, Business & Financial Services: Similar to the healthcare sector, the Greater Oklahoma City region provides business and financial services to a market that extends beyond state boundaries. This sector makes up 19% of the metro’s total workforce with more than 133,000 employees.

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COST OF DOING BUSINESS - SELECT METRO COMPARISON

Metro

Cost of Doing Business Unit Labor Cost Energy Cost

State & Local Tax Office Rent

Index

Rank

Index Rank Index Rank Index Rank Index Rank

Oklahoma City, OK 86

3

105 27 75 1 64 5

62 T-6 62 T-6 51 1 62 T-6 87 34

Kansas City, MO Nashville, TN Indianapolis, IN San Antonio, TX

93 82 88 88

14

114 46 91 15 77 100 14 93 16 66

14

1

8

T-6 T-6

96 92

6 3

102 24 96

34

86 9

63

3

Source: Moody’s North American Business Cost Review; Metros over 1 million population, 2018

Using the C2ER Cost of Living Calculator, if you make $65,000 per year in Seattle, you can have the same standard of living in OKC for 45% less. To maintain your standard of living, you would need to make $35,000.

COST OF LIVING INDEX

City

Composite Index

Grocery Items Index

Housing Index

Utilities Index

Transportation Index

Health Care Index

Misc. Goods & Services Index

Memphis, TN

80.4

88.7

68.2

87.2

85.9

78.1

83.5

Oklahoma City, OK 85.7 93.1

68.8 95.3 86.1

94.9 87.1 90.5 107.0

92

San Antonio, TX Indianapolis, IN

89.1 92.1

87.8 93.8

81.3 77.5

87.7

89

96.4 97.8

105.5 97.7

Atlanta, GA

102.4 102.7 110.8 120.0 149.5 150.1 156.7 196.6 237.4

103.1 111.6

102.4 85.2

103.4

105.9

Pittsburgh, PA Denver, CO Chicago, IL Arlington, VA Boston, MA

104.5 116.2 113.8

93.0

92.6

98.0

137.8 80.6 154.0 92.4 250.1 97.2

100.8 125.6 108.2

103.6 100.0

106.5 109.3 113.2 129.1 136.0 133.2 136.2

101.6 124.2 109.0 128.8 130.9 139.7

91.2

226.1 120.6 111.8 225.0 108.1 137.6 364.8 123.2 145.0 514.0 120.6 128.6

118.2 128.6 129.5 110.5

Seattle, WA

San Francisco, CA Manhattan NYC

100 = average of reporting communities SOURCE: C2ER COST OF LIVING INDEX, Annual Average 2019

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LEADING EMPLOYERS: The following table shows the major employers in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area.

COMPANY

PRODUCT/SERVICE

EMPLOYEES

State of Oklahoma Tinker Air Force Base

Government

47,300 24,000 12,700 9,000

Military

University of Oklahoma - Norman

Higher Education

INTEGRIS Health*

Health Care

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Higher Education

7,500 7,000 5,500 5,100 5,000 4,800 3,400 3,300 3,200 3,000 3,000 2,950 2,700 2,500 2,500 2,460 2,300 2,100 2,000 1,800 1,700 1,700 1,600 1,600 1,500 1,400 1,400 1,300 1,200 1,100 1,100 1,080 1,060 1,000 1,000

FAA Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center

Aerospace Health Care

Mercy Hospital*

Hobby Lobby Stores Inc*

Wholesale & Retail

Amazon

Distribution Government

City of Oklahoma City OGE Energy Corp* OU Medical Center The Boeing Company

Utility

Health Care Aerospace Health Care

SSM Health Care of Oklahoma, Inc. University of Central Oklahoma

Higher Education

Norman Regional Hospital

Health Care

AT&T

Telecommunications

Paycom*

Technology

Devon Energy Corp*

Oil & Gas

Sonic Corp*

Wholesale & Retail

Dell

Sales & Business Services

Oklahoma City Community College

Higher Education

Midfirst Bank*

Finance

UPS

Transportation

BancFirst*

Finance

Hertz Corporation

Rental Services

Chesapeake Energy Corp*

Oil & Gas Oil & Gas

Enable Midstream*

Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores*

Retail

American Fidelity* Cox Communications

Finance/Insurance Telecommunications Beverage Distribution

Great Plains Coca-Cola Bottling Company

Johnson Controls

Manufacturing

Farmers Insurance Group

Customer Service

Bank of Oklahoma

Finance Oil & Gas

Continental Resources*

Dolese Bros. Co.*

Manufacturing

INTEGRIS-Deaconess Hospital*

Health Care

Rose State College

Higher Education

Does not account for COVID-19 layoffs; subject to revision *Indicates headquarters in the MSA; employee counts subject to change Numbers may include all branches and not just a single location SOURCE: THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY CHAMBER

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EDUCATION

K-12 EDUCATION: The Greater Oklahoma City Region offers a variety of choices in K-12 Education. Our 10-county area enrolls more than 293,700 students in the public school system. Harding Charter Prep High School, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Dove Science Academy, Edmond North High School and the Oklahoma School of Science and Math (OSSM) are regularly recognized on the U.S. News & World Report’s Best High Schools in the Nation list. A total of 55 schools in our region have been recognized as National Blue Ribbon Schools. Our region gives parents diverse educational options with 34 public charter schools and 30 private and parochial schools recognized by the Oklahoma Private School Accreditation Commission. WORKING TOGETHER Civic, business and education leaders developed a blueprint that has forever changed the area’s largest school district, Oklahoma City Public Schools. MAPS for Kids was a comprehensive education reform plan that raised $700 million for Oklahoma City Public Schools and surrounding school districts. In addition to building seven schools and renovating 65 others, the comprehensive plan implemented strategic academic reforms; improved student achievement; restored classroom discipline; and increased accountability with students, parents and the community.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (POPULATION 25 YEARS AND OVER)

Less than High School Graduate..... 11.1% High School/Technical School....... 27.2% Some College........................................24.1% College Graduate or Higher............ 37.6%

SOURCE: CENSUS, 2014-2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY (1 YEAR ESTIMATE); OKC MSA

“CLASSEN SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDIES HIGH RANKS IN THE TOP 100 IN THE NATION.” - U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

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TOP 20 DEGREE COMPLETIONS IN THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION

Protective Services 492

Liberal Studies 2,025

Health Professionals 2,963

Education 1,455

Parks, Recreation & Leisure 369

Engineering 1,960

Computer & Information Science 687

Multi/ Interdisciplinary Studies 933

Public Admin 358

Agriculture & Related Sciences 627

Biological & Biomedical Sciences 952

Psychology 918

Communication & Journalism 830

Engineering Technologies 296

Law 518

Family & Consumer Science 548

Physical Sciences 390

Business 4,630

Social Sciences 935

Graduates 296

Visual & Performing

4,630+

Arts 999

SOURCE: OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, 2018-2019

HIGHER EDUCATION In the Greater Oklahoma City area,

technology center districts operating on: 58 campuses, 395 comprehensive school districts, 16 skill centers and three juvenile facilities. Not only do these centers provide training to high school and post-secondary students, they also provide invaluable training services to a variety of businesses in a number of different skill areas. The Greater Oklahoma City Career Technology Centers of Excellence Compact delivered over 275,000 training hours to more than 1,500 companies last year.

there are 15 public and private colleges and universities, including two research universities, Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. These institutions of higher learning provide thousands of undergraduate and graduate degree opportunities to over 135,000 students. Oklahoma also has a nationally acclaimed Career and Technology system, offering programs and services in 29

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AREA COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

2018-2019

Enrollment

University of Oklahoma OU Health Sciences Center

31,237

State, four-year State, four-year State, four-year State, four-year State, two-year State, four-year State, two-year State, four-year State, two-year State, two-year Private, four-year State, four-year Private, four-year Private, four-year Private, four-year Private, four-year State, four-year Private, four-year Private, four-year

3,391

OU College of Law

1,161

Oklahoma State University

27,062

OSU - Oklahoma City

8,144

OSU School of Veterinary Medicine Oklahoma City Community College University of Central Oklahoma

439

17,443 18,140 9,903 2,619 3,199 2,666 2,408 2,601

Rose State College

Redlands Community College Oklahoma City University

Langston University

Mid-America Christian University Oklahoma Christian University Southern Nazarene University* Oklahoma Baptist University

2,081 2,138

University of Science & Arts of Oklahoma Southwestern Christian University*

957 598 368

Randall University* Total Enrollment

136,555

SOURCE: OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IPEDS DATA CENTER Total includes 2018-2019 full academic year (fall, spring, summer) enrollment; *fall 2018 enrollment used when complete info is not available

CAREERTECH TRAINING INSTITUTIONS

2018-2019 Enrollment Location

Francis Tuttle - All Sites

25,617 25,080 15,154 10,838

Oklahoma City

Canadian Valley Technology Center - All Sites

El Reno

Meridian Technology Center

Stillwater Shawnee

Gordon Cooper Technology Center

Metro Technology Centers/Springlake Campus 21,066

Oklahoma City

Moore Norman Technology Center - All Sites Mid-America Technology Center Mid-Del Technology Center - All Sites Eastern Oklahoma County Technology Center

9,688 13,077 5,815 2,580 128,915

Norman Wayne

Midwest City

Choctaw

Total Enrollment*

SOURCE: OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION, 2018-2019 *Total enrollment includes ACD, industry specific training and full-time enrollment .

20 20

GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES DEGREE COMPLETION AND ENROLLMENT

ENROLLMENT 2018-19

5 YEAR AVERAGE

DEGREES 2018-19

5 YEAR AVERAGE

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Agriculture and Related Sciences Architecture and Related Services Biological and Biomedical Sciences

2,674

2,557

627

580 102 865

615

542

94

7,008 20,013

6,419

952

Business

21,465 3,966

4,630

4,591

Communication and Journalism Communications Technologies Computer and Information Science

3,917

830

861

51

74

31

37

3,683

3,904

687

657

Construction Trades Culinary Services

42 151

61

3

10 22

161

19

Education Engineering

6,669 9,425 2,645

7,661

1,455 1,960

1,455 1,827

10,507 3,437

Engineering Technologies

296 227

391 251

English Language and Literature Ethnic, Cultural, and Gender Studies Family and Consumer Science

986

1,147

122

137

35

41

2,357

2,937

548

605

Foreign Languages Health Professions

652

710

172

169

18,009

17,958

2,963

3,090

History

993

1,012

167

176 539 374

Homeland Security and Protective Services

2,934 1,694

3,065 1,330

492 518

Law

Liberal Arts and Sciences

20,047

22,208

2,025

2,174

Library Science

257 984

212

65

57

Mathematics and Statistics

1,042

214

189

Mechanic and Repair Technologies Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies Natural Resources and Conservation

152

217

48

79

2,844

2,898

933

1,027

347

322

90

82

Parks and Recreation Philosophy and Religion

2,602

2,428

369

353

346

339

84

78

Physical Sciences

2,820 5,201

3,347 5,210 1,050

390 918 358

399 855 299

Psychology

Public Administration Science Technologies

1,149

105

91

14

13

Social Sciences

3,767

3,829

935

854

Theology

597 754

729 604

94 119

95 117

Transportation and Materials Moving

Visual and Performing Arts Unknown or Not Declared

5,334 1,930

5,214 1,828

999

892

42

15

Grand Total:

133,876

140,618 24,403

24,221

Does not include proprietary institutions who do not report to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Source: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, 2019

21

Oklahoma City’s cost of living consistently ranks below the national average, allowing one’s paycheck to stretch further. Oklahoma City also offers some of the most affordable housing, transportation, utilities, groceries and gas in the U.S., and residents still have more disposable income than in other cities. See the cost of living calculator in the “About Oklahoma City” section of www.okcchamber.com/ costofliving . INCOME

10 COUNTY GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION 2019

# Households Per Income Category

Median Household Income

% of Total Households

Under $15,000..............................................................................69,520............................................. 11.3% $15,000 - $24,999...................................................................... 58,003............................................. 9.4% $25,000-$34,999....................................................................... 65,064............................................10.6% $35,000-$49,999........................................................................84,936............................................ 13.7% $50,000 - $74,999........................................................................111,651............................................18.6% $75,000 - $99,999...................................................................... 77,269............................................ 12.6% $100,000 - $149,999.................................................................. 83,572............................................ 13.6% $150,000 - $199,000................................................................... 33,185............................................. 5.4% $200,000+...................................................................................... 28,812............................................. 4.7%

Total Households.................................................. 615,021 Median HH Income.............................................$54,757 Average HH Income........................................... $76,105

SOURCE: ESRI BUSINESS ANALYST, 2019 10-COUNTY GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION

22

LABOR ANALYSIS UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

The unemployment rate for the Oklahoma City metropolitan area in 2019 averaged 3%, ranging from as low as 2.6% to as high as 3.5%. Increases in the area’s population and labor force have kept pace with economic growth, keeping the region’s unemployment rate low in comparison to the nation. The disruption in the local and national labor markets caused by COVID-19 are not reflected in these numbers.

LABOR ANALYSIS 2019

“OKLAHOMA CITY IS NOW THE 25TH-LARGEST CITY IN THE U.S.” - U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

Oklahoma City MSA

Greater Oklahoma City Region

Labor Force

685,758 765,172

Employed 664,945 741,904 Unemployed 20,814 23,267 Underemployed 70,558 75,893 Unemployment Rate 3.0% 3.0% Source: U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Statistics, Oklahoma City MSA and Greater Oklahoma City Region; These numbers do not reflect COVID-19 disruption.

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY

Oklahoma City MSA

Greater Oklahoma City Region

Information

1.1%

1.1%

Other Services

2.5% 3.0%

4.2% 3.1%

Natural Resources and Mining

Construction

5.3% 5.2% 5.4%

5.2% 5.1% 5.6% 12.3% 13.5%

Financial Activities

Manufacturing

Leisure and Hospitality 12.1%

Professional and Business Services Education and Health Services Trade, Transportation and Utilities

14.2%

13.8%

13.5%

18.4%

18.1%

Government

19.0%

18.4%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics QCEW; 2019. These numbers do not reflect COVID-19 disruption.

23

Average Hourly Wage Scales of Selected Occupations

Position

Entry Wage

Average Wage

Accountants and Auditors

$19.47 $37.06

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Computer and Information Systems Managers

$11.51 $31.91

$19.29 $57.75

Computer Programmers Computer Systems Analysts

$22.52 $38.08 $19.66 $36.42 $15.65 $23.59 $10.58 $16.40 $19.20 $34.17 $13.40 $20.90 $26.08 $55.43 $12.62 $19.72 $27.35 $49.55 $13.09 $19.35 $9.63 $14.79 $15.55 $23.47

Computer Support Specialist Customer Service Representatives Database Administrators and Architects

Administrative Assistant

Financial Managers

Human Resources Assistants, Except Payroll and Timekeeping

Human Resources Managers

Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators

Material Handler

Machinists

Registered Nurses $22.83 $31.98 Software Developers and Software Quality Assurance Analysts and Testers $25.65 $43.03 Telemarketers $8.94 $12.67 Average for Oklahoma City MSA, all occupations $9.29 $23.26 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics, 2019, Oklahoma City MSA

24

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE Oklahoma City’s construction climate, one of the most competitive in the United States, makes building a facility an affordable and viable option. Costs of commercial and industrial construction are significantly lower here than in most areas throughout the Southwest, including Dallas, Houston, Phoenix and Denver, according to the RS Means Square Foot Costs survey. INDUSTRIAL SITES The Greater Oklahoma City Chamber maintains a comprehensive online database, www.okcedis.com , of industrial buildings and sites for the Greater Oklahoma City region. Customized site or building searches, site and building tours or build-to-suit

proposals are available. Office Rental Rates Class A Office Quote

Industrial Rental Rates

Flex/R&D Quote

$9.60 $5.99

$23.02 $18.76 $16.30 $20.08

Warehouse-Distribution Quote

Class B Office Quote Class C Office Quote Central Business District Avg. Quote Suburban Markets Avg. Quote Average Vacancy Rate

Average Vacancy Rate

4.8%

Retail Rental Rates Lease Rates Average Vacancy Rate*

$15.88-$21.12

$9.95-$20.99

9.6%

6.0% *based on weighted avg. lease rates in 19 submarkets

SOURCE: CBRE, COSTAR REPORTS, 2020

Location Factor Index / Commercial Construction

City

Index Value

San Antonio

0.83 0.85 0.85 0.91 0.92 0.96 1.00 1.02 1.06

Oklahoma City

Dallas

Omaha

Indianapolis Cleveland Kansas City Pittsburgh Minneapolis

Chicago 1.19 Source: RSMeans Square Foot Costs, 2020 OKLAHOMA CITY IS 15% BELOW THE NATIONAL AVERAGE

25

TAX RATES In 2009, the state voted to reduce personal income tax to 5.25% followed by further reductions to 5% in 2016. Oklahoma’s taxation and regulatory policies are competitive, both regionally and nationally.

“OKC RANKS AS THE BEST RUN LARGE METRO FOR THE 3RD YEAR IN A ROW” -WALLET HUB

Tax Rate

Corporate Income Tax�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6% Sales Tax (State & Local) �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 8.625%* State Personal Income Tax ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5% Ad Valorem (Property Tax) Real Property.......................................................................Less than 1% of assessed value Personal (Machinery & Equipment) �������������������������������������������������1.5% of market value

Unemployment Compensation Tax - 1.5% on first $18,700 of payroll and 0.1% to 5.5% after two years experience

*Local sales tax based on City of Oklahoma City rate of 4.125%. Local tax rates vary by city and county from 3% to 5%. SOURCE: OKLAHOMA TAX COMMISSION

26

UTILITIES

ELECTRICITY - AVERAGE COST PER KWH Region

ENERGY COSTS AND PROVIDERS The 10-county Greater Oklahoma City region has two investor-owned electric utilities providing most of the electric service to the region. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company and Public Service Company of Oklahoma vary in rates. There are also several municipally-owned energy providers in the Greater Oklahoma City region. OG&E Energy Corp., is a fully regulated utility. In July 2018, Edison Electric Institute reported that an average 1,000kW/400,000kWh monthly industrial bill in Oklahoma would be $24,647/$0.062 per kWh. For the same consumption, the average bill in Texas would be $30,465/$0.077 per kWh and the US average would be $41,057/$0.103 per kWh. The average cost of industrial electricity in Oklahoma City is 6.2 cents per kWh. This rate is 38% below the national average. Visit www.oge.com . Oklahoma Natural Gas’ tariffs range from small commercial/industrial using 1,000 Dth to facilities using in excess of 450,000 Dth per year. Rates are determined by factors such as annual revenue and capital investment expenses incurred. Visit www.oneok.com .

All Sectors Electricity

Residential Electricity

Industrial Electricity

Greater OKC 8.09¢

10.30¢

5.34¢ 5.64¢ 5.39¢ 7.60¢

Arkansas

7.78¢ 8.48¢

9.81¢

Texas

11.20¢ 13.35¢ 12.87¢

Kansas

10.72¢ 10.53¢

USA 6.92¢ Source: U.S. Dept of Energy, U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Power Industry Report (2018)

GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY UTILITIES:

ENERGY Electricity in the Oklahoma City region is provided by: OGE Energy Corp., Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, City of Stroud, Edmond Electric, Kingfisher Public Works Authority, Oklahoma Electric Cooperative, Public Service Company of Oklahoma, and Stillwater Electric Utility. Natural Gas provided by Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. WATER - CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY Water System Capacity.................250,000,000 gpd STORAGE CAPACITY- CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY Present Demand................................. 131,000,000 gpd Peak Demand.....................................212,000,000 gpd WASTEWATER/SEWER - CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY Sewer Treatment Capacity.......... 120,000,000 gpd Present Load........................................64,000,000 gpd *Rates vary depending on municipality

Guthrie ranks as one of the best small towns in the South. -Southern Living

27

Incentives for Quality Jobs OKLAHOMA QUALITY JOBS PROGRAM – 10 YEAR CASH INCENTIVE Companies can directly receive up to 5% of new payroll in the form of quarterly cash payments for up to 10 years. OKLAHOMA QUALITY JOBS – SMALL EMPLOYER PROGRAM Allows qualifying small businesses (500 employees or less) to receive up to 5% cash-back incentive for up to seven years to locate or expand in Oklahoma. 21ST CENTURY QUALITY JOBS INCENTIVE PROGRAM – 10 YEAR CASH INCENTIVE Created to attract certain growth industries by rewarding businesses with a highly-skilled workforce. Companies can receive up to 10% on new payroll for up to 10 years. QUALITY JOBS & INVESTMENT TAX CREDIT Qualifying companies typically have to choose either the Quality Jobs Program OR the Investment/ New Jobs Tax Credit benefits. Qualifying manufacturing companies will have the option of receiving both of these incentives depending upon eligibility requirements, including and revenue positive determination by the state. STATE INCENTIVES Visit www.GreaterOklahomaCity.com for complete details and requirements associated with incentives.

Incentives for Investment INVESTMENT/NEW JOBS TAX CREDITS Provides growing manufacturers a significant tax credit based on investment in depreciable property or the addition of full-time employees engaged in manufacturing, processing, or aircraft maintenance. A 1% tax credit of qualified investment for five-years totaling 5%. Tax credit doubles in enterprise zones or for investments worth over $40M. BUSINESS EXPANSION INCENTIVE PROGRAM This incentive targets business expansion projects which include job creation and significant investment in facilities, machinery, and equipment.

Norman is a Top 10 city to kickstart your career. -WalletHub

28

Incentives for Workforce AEROSPACE INDUSTRY ENGINEER WORKFORCE TAX CREDITS Aerospace companies hiring engineers in a variety of fields will receive tax credit equal to 5% of the compensation paid to an engineer and 10% if the engineer graduated from an Oklahoma college or university, plus another credit of up to 50% of the tuition reimbursed to an employee. Additionally, the engineer hired receives a tax credit of $5,000 per year. AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEER WORKFORCE TAX CREDIT Companies that manufacture or assemble motor vehicles, or manufacture automotive parts, and hire newly employed engineers may be eligible for a corporate income tax credit of up to 10% of the compensation paid to the engineer, plus an additional tax credit of up to 50% of the tuition cost reimbursed to an employee. Additionally, the engineer hired receives a tax credit of $5,000 per year.

CUSTOMIZED EMPLOYEE TRAINING Consistently ranked as one of the top programs in the nation, Oklahoma’s Training for Industry Program (TIP) provides customized training and resources to qualifying new and expanding Oklahoma companies at little or no cost to the company. Delivered through the state’s Career Technology Centers, TIP ensures that companies have a productive workforce from the start.

SOFTWARE/CYBERSECURITY WORKFORCE TAX CREDIT

Cybersecurity or software employees who have received a degree from an accredited institution can receive a tax credit up to $2,200 annually or $1,800 annually for qualifying employees who are awarded a certificate from a technology center.

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