Phyllis Law - March 2019

www.PhyllisLaw.com | 404.514.3397

Protecting Bright Futures

MAR 2019

Bright Futures Bulletin

I never want to be the lawyer that does the bare minimum for her clients. I believe it’s important to offer support — sometimes beyond my legal expertise — to help my clients and their families understand ways they can avoid facing legal trouble in the future. Creating bright futures isn’t just a slogan for me; it’s a mission I set out to complete for each client I represent. Recently, I represented a few clients who had been struggling with relatively normal issues juveniles are facing. In addition to my legal expertise and counsel, I try to provide my clients with additional resources I find effective in rehabilitation. One of my favorite approaches to whole health is implementing the use of a life coach. For those unfamiliar with life coaching, this may sound like a hack suggestion with flaky intentions. But anyone who has tried this technique will tell you that it’s designed to give you the agency to dig deeper within your personal potential. It’s meant to help you grow, not just change. For instance, shoplifting is seldom about the "loot" and more often an effect of something deeper. The compulsion to shoplift can be related to struggling with peer pressure, or maybe they are spending time with the wrong people. Other youthful offenders may be struggling with an addiction or are choosing to self-medicate instead of seeking professional assistance. Life coaching is designed to help them discover these diseased roots and make better decisions in an effort to heal them. I’m happy to report that these clients have seen some success and have found the life coach to be a great benefit to them. They are learning how to take a proactive role in their life, and they are digging into the roots of why they found themselves in legal trouble.

Life coaching isn’t just something I suggest to my clients. It’s something I use as well. I’m an avid listener of "Life Coach School", a podcast by Brooke Castillo. I have applied the lessons Brooke teaches in her podcast to my daily life, and I was taking the agency to actively make these changes. For me, life and self-coaching is a personal check-in that helps me prioritize and make a plan. I’m able to set short- and long-term goals while also holding myself accountable. Outside of podcasting, I also rely on professional peers for reflection and check-ins with myself. I am a member of an association of lawyers that collaborate on strategies for managing a small law firm, and each one of us has our own “coach.” Each week, I have a scheduled conversation with my coach. Together we make an action plan to reach goals. He assigns me homework and holds me accountable. Just like the podcasts, my coach is a mentor and is a partner in the success of my law firm. If you’re skeptical about life or self-coaching, try Life Coach School or a personal peer. I know I have discovered opportunities to improve, and seeing those changes transpire motivates me to continue. And I don’t just do this for me; I know how important being the best I can be is for my clients and their bright futures. We are thrilled to announce that we now offer life coach services at PhyllisLaw.com. If you are interested, we are offering an initial consultation for $50. Call or text 404.514.3397 and mention this article.

Creating Bright Futures How Life Coaching Helps My Clients — And Me

They are learning how to take

a proactive role in their life, and they are digging into the roots of why they found themselves in legal trouble. ”

–Phyllis Gingrey Collins

1

www.PhyllisLaw.com | 404.514.3397

Published by The Newsletter Pro www.TheNewsletterPro.com

Go Natural with Your Antibiotics 2 Ways to Fight Bacteria

Our world is becoming increasingly antibacterial with practically every office, medical facility, and school being equipped with dozens of containers of hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes. While these products claim to be 99.9 percent effective at killing bacteria, the harsh chemicals dry

that are completely natural yet totally effective against the microorganisms that make us sick.

even when you file for bankruptcy. However, if a judge has given you a sanction as part of your divorce, that fee or fine can be discharged. Here’s an example: A husband and wife decide to divorce, and once everything shakes out, the husband ends up with more money than the wife. The judge may order the husband to pay spousal support payments as a result, and, should the husband file for bankruptcy following the divorce, this payment could not be discharged. If the husband was found to be “unnecessarily litigious” during the divorce proceedings and that is why a judge ordered him to pay attorney's fees or sanctions, this could be discharged. People who are divorcing and contemplating bankruptcy should consult a bankruptcy attorney before completing the divorce if possible. The final order could impact discharge-ability in a future bankruptcy filing. At Phyllis Law, we have 12 years of experience helping people work through their financial dilemmas. Find out howwe can help you by calling 404.514.3397 or visiting PhyllisLaw.com. As an antibacterial, oregano is most useful as an essential oil. In this form, it’s highly potent, meaning you only need a drop or two in a glass of water for it to have an effect. You can drink it, or you can infuse a couple of drops into some coconut oil and apply to your skin. However, be warned that because it is potent, it should not be used on a regular, ongoing basis. Use only when needed and only for a few days at a time — and never use it undiluted! as peptic ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori. Manuka honey is particularly great for this — just add some to hot tea or water and drink! OREGANO A study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences took a look at the effectiveness of oregano against bacteria. It turns out certain compounds in oregano — carvacrol and thymol — make it a strong antibacterial and antifungal agent. The study found that oregano was effective against salmonella as well as other harmful microorganisms and fungi that make people sick.

RAWHONEY Most honey you find at the store has been pasteurized and filtered, rendering it far less effective when it comes to its antibacterial properties. On the other hand, raw, unfiltered honey is an

out our skin, and over time, bacteria become more and more resistant to these agents. Doctors, too, are blamed for overprescribing antibiotics. As a result, we’re hearing more and more about “superbugs” — strains of harmful bacteria that cause severe illness and are not easily remedied by antibiotics.

incredible antiseptic. Even better than your average raw honey is manuka honey, which comes from New Zealand. Its antibacterial

properties are potent enough that hospitals around the world keep it on hand to treat certain kinds of infections and burns.

But you can still protect yourself and your family against illness-

D ivorce is never easy, and it often comes with a slew of tough decisions, including housing choices, child custody, and financial changes. Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon for those who have gone through a divorce to also file for bankruptcy. Due to less income coming through the door each month, fees associated with a divorce, and having to start a new financial plan, it’s not hard to see why divorce may result in filing for bankruptcy. There’s no shame in admitting you need to file for bankruptcy, but like divorce, its stipulations can be confusing. When filing for bankruptcy as a divorcee, you may have the right to have some of your fees and fines associated with the divorce discharged. For example, if you are not the prevailing party in your divorce case and you’ve been ordered to pay the attorney fees, you may be able to have those fees discharged. But “may” is the key word here. If you’ve been ordered to pay spousal or child support following a divorce, you cannot have those fees discharged. Those are responsibilities that you will remain legally obligated to pay, If you get a cut, applying raw honey to the wound can keep out harmful, infection-causing bacteria while killing any existing bacteria. Not only does the honey help prevent infection but it can also help reduce healing time. Raw honey can also help alleviate internal infections, such

causing bacteria without resorting to harsh chemicals and medications. The answer is to go all-natural! Here are two options

Bankruptcy 101 CanMy Divorce Fees Be Discharged If I Filed for Bankruptcy?

2

www.PhyllisLaw.com | 404.514.3397

SUDOKU BREAK Solution on pg. 4

Financial Fluency 3 SimpleWays You Can Teach Your Kids About Their Finances

Teaching your children about financial literacy and budgeting may seem like a daunting task if you’re not a financial expert, but as the following methods show, there are simple ways you can turn these complicated concepts into fun lessons.

PickUp a Book

Homemade Corned Beef

Inspired by Food Network

Whether you want to teach your toddler about dollars and cents or you want to show your teenager ways to create smart spending habits, books can be an easy way for your child to learn about money. Radio host and financial expert Dave Ramsey has written numerous books about creating better spending, budgeting, and saving habits. Ramsey’s Junior’s Adventures books are the perfect financial literacy starters for children ages 3–12, while his well-known book, “Total Money Makeover” can help your teenagers transform into financially savvy young adults. Next time you’re at the grocery store, turn the errand into a budget-planning game. Set a limit for the amount of money you can spend as a family, and create a list of what you need to purchase. Once at the store, have your children choose between multiple items — such as two different brands — and select the one they think would be best. If they go over the dollar amount they have to spend, discuss which item would be best to return. This will not only teach them the value of making smart financial decisions; it will also parse out the difference between needs and wants. TurnHabits Into Lessons

Ingredients

• • • •

● 2 quarts water 1 cup kosher salt

● 12 whole juniper berries ● 2 bay leaves, crumbled ● 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger ● 2 pounds ice ● 1 5-pound beef brisket, trimmed

1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons saltpeter (potassium nitrate) ● 1 cinnamon stick, broken into large pieces ● 1 teaspoon mustard seeds ● 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

• •

1 small onion, quartered

● 1 large carrot, coarsely chopped ● 1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped

GoDigital

• •

● 8 cloves garlic ● 8 whole allspice berries

In a world of tablets, smartphones, and social media, the digital world is full of fun apps that give kids the agency to plan and learn on their own. For example, PiggyBot is a digital version of a child’s beloved piggy bank, which allows kids to monitor how much money they have in their savings accounts, track their allowance, and keep a

Directions

“wishlist” of items they are saving for. In addition, there are plenty of others designed to turn learning financial literacy into something fun! Teaching your children proper financial skills sets them up for future success. If you’re interested in one of Dave Ramsey’s books or if you need help with your own financial dilemmas, find out how Phyllis Law can help. Call 404.514.3397 today.

1. In a large stockpot, combine water, garlic, and all herbs and spices to make brine. Cook over high heat until salt and sugar are fully dissolved. Re- move from heat and stir in ice. 2. Once water temp reaches 45 F, place brisket in a 2-gallon zip-close bag, pour in brine to cover, lay flat in a large container, and store in fridge. 3. Brine for 10 days, checking daily to make sure bris- ket is fully submerged and brine is stirred. 4. After 10 days, remove brisket from brine and rinse under cool water. In a large pot, cover brisket, onion, carrot, and celery with water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and gently simmer for 2 1/2–3 hours. 5. Remove, slice across the grain, and serve.

3

www.PhyllisLaw.com | 404.514.3397

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

www.PhyllisLaw.com | 404.514.3397 278 N. Marietta Pkwy NE | Marietta, GA 30060

Solution from pg. 3

Inside This Issue

The Power of Life Coaching 1

2 Effective Natural Antibiotics

Filing Bankruptcy After Divorce 2

Ways to Teach Your Kids About Finances

Homemade Corned Beef 3

Is It Time for Your Child’s First Part- Time Job? 4

When Should Your Kids Start Working?

Out of the Game Room and Into the Workplace

When the dolls and baseball cards get pushed to the wayside for cell phones and movie dates, it may be time to gently nudge your child out from under your wing and into the workplace. It doesn’t have to be pushing shopping carts or spinning signs on the corner; working in any capacity during formative years builds character and gives your child real-world experience. Summer jobs teach the value of a dollar and give kids lasting memories, and after-school gigs lead to more pocket change for the weekends and less worrying for Mom and Dad. The hard part isn’t asking yourself if they should work; it’s asking yourself when they should work. In the U.S., most of us have about four decades of working to look forward to. Many start working in late adolescence and continue until retirement age. Now, that’s a lot of work to be had. So why rush it? Well, idle hands often spell disaster. Sitting around

all day is a burden on both child and parent, whether they realize it or not. Those few years between hitting puberty and graduating high school are the sweet spot for your child to start their part-time career. There’s no shame in flipping burgers, stocking shelves, or mowing lawns. As of 2014, there were 16 million workers in the retail and food service industries, and the numbers have only gone up from there. But work ethic is changing among American teenagers. Just one-third of individuals aged 16–19 had a job lined up for last summer, compared to 51.2 percent for the same age range in 1997. While surviving on minimum wage as an adult is a topic of great debate, raking in around $10 an hour as a 14-year-old can seem like a king’s ransom. A few working hours here and there will do your grown baby a world of good and prepare them for the next chapter of their lives.

4

www.PhyllisLaw.com | 404.514.3397

Published by The Newsletter Pro www.TheNewsletterPro.com

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4

www.phyllislaw.com

Made with FlippingBook - professional solution for displaying marketing and sales documents online