Anderson Dental Care - December 2018

BRUSH - UP

ANDERSON DENTAL CARE Nathan Brooks, DDS, Inc.

7525 STATE RD, STE. A, CINCINNATI, OH 45255 | 513-438-8152 | WWW.ATOWNDENTAL.COM | DECEMBER 2018

TWINKLY LIGHTS AND HOLIDAY CANDIES SOME OF THE BEST (AND WORST) CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS

The celebrations surrounding any fun-filled holiday usually bring memories of past family traditions to the forefront of people’s minds. Christmas, for example, is chock-full of rituals that are passed down like heirlooms through generations. If your mom made a tasty breakfast casserole for you and your siblings to devour on Christmas morning, you might find yourself doing the same for your own kids. If your dad challenged you to a snowman- building contest during your holiday break from school, you’ll likely find yourself engaging in that same competition as a parent. This year in particular, I’ve been spending quite a bit of time thinking about all the traditions associated with the holiday season, and I’ve found that while most of them are wonderful because they bring families closer together, others can be somewhat problematic. As a dentist, I can’t help but stress over the traditions that negatively affect people’s teeth. Food is one of the biggest issues. From October all the way through December, you probably find yourself eating food you ordinarily wouldn’t. Around Halloween, you’ll have Jolly Ranchers, Laffy Taffy, and Gobstoppers. Then once Christmas rolls around, you’ll have candy canes, peppermint bark, and peanut brittle. Because your teeth are used to softer foods during the other months, they are more likely to break as you chomp through these desserts with harder textures.

In addition to the types of sweets that are popular this time of year, your teeth can suffer from the weather. As you stroll through the freezing temperatures to walk your dog or catch the bus, you might notice that your teeth chatter to combat the cold, which can also result in broken teeth. People can also injure their teeth during the holiday season because of stress. With the chaos that surrounds the holiday season, people can feel pressured to get all the planning done. Between preparing and cooking meals, cleaning the house, and shopping for gifts, stress is nearly inevitable. If you feel overtaxed, make sure you aren’t making a habit of grinding your teeth. While some traditions — like eating hard

customs my family and I share make this year especially noteworthy. We start out the month of December by driving around and looking at the Christmas lights — it’s one of our favorite traditions. How cool is it that during the darkest time of year, people all across the world hang up lights to brighten the night sky? In a way, it’s like these twinkly lights bring cheer to a darkened world. My family and I love to go see the festival of lights at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. I imagine that this year, the display will be just as beautiful as ever. In addition to admiring the lights around town, we will also gather up members of our family and go caroling. We usually bake treats, let our kids pick some of their friends’ houses to visit, and sing them a few of the Christmas classics. I always want to lead with “O Come, All Ye Faithful,” but my kids are too fond of “Jingle Bells” to agree with me! Because so many relatives are visiting this Christmas, we’ll have a total of 15 carolers to help us share in the holiday cheer. For me, no family tradition outweighs another, and regardless of what you do to celebrate this year, have fun, be safe, and to give your dentist a little more peace of mind, take extra-special care of your teeth.

candies — should be sampled rather than indulged in this year, other traditions should definitely be celebrated. Some of the annual world hang up lights to brighten the night sky?” “How cool is it that during the darkest time of year, people all across the

– Dr. Brooks

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HOW OUR TEAM MEMBERS CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TRADITION? For many families all across the world, the best part of celebrating the holiday season is getting together with loved ones to take part in annual traditions that signal one important thing: Christmas is finally here! If you read the article on the cover of this newsletter, then you have a good idea of how Dr. Brooks and his family celebrate the holiday. Read below to check the rest of the team members’ favorite Christmas pastimes. KERRY “My favorite holiday tradition is when my family gets together on Christmas Day, and we all wear matching flannel pajamas, watch Christmas movies, and eat sweets from our stockings all day.” SYDNEY “Next year, I will be getting married, and one holiday tradition I hope to start as a new family would be some kind of service or giving back to families in need. I think it’s important to remember that the holidays can be a stressful time for a lot of people, and it would be nice to make a tradition that reflects the true meaning of the holiday season.” ALI “Although it’s a newer one, my favorite tradition is going to the tree farm with my husband and cutting down our tree. We then bring it home and decorate it together while listening to Christmas music.” KATIE “Every year, all of the women on my mom’s side of the family fly in from all over the country. We spend two days baking cookies and making candy while wearing matching aprons. We call it Cookie Day. At the end of the weekend, we meet up with all of the men in the family, exchange gifts, and play games. It’s the one weekend a year that we are all in the same house and get to spend time together.”

HERE WE COME A-WASSAILING PLAN YOUR FAMILY’S CHRISTMAS CAROLING PARTY

In some families, caroling is an annual event, while others stick to watching the characters sing at the end of “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” If you want to make Christmas caroling part of your holiday traditions, we have some tips to help make your outing the best ever. PLAN EARLY Calendars fill up fast around the holidays, so if you want to include people outside of your household in your caroling party, send out invitations early. You don’t want your caroling gathering to be a bust because all your guests had other plans. HAVE SONGS PICKED OUT Will your caroling group perform classics like “Silent Night” or something silly like “Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer”? Get everyone on the same page, print out sheet music, and practice before the big night. DRESS FOR SUCCESS Some carolers wear matching scarves, while others go out in full Victorian-inspired costumes. Whatever dress code you decide on, dress for what the temperature will be after dark. You don’t want your caroling to get cut short because of frostbite. If you are caroling outdoors, add reflective tape and flashing lights to your clothing so your party can be seen by passing cars. DON’T MAKE EVERYONE SING One of your kids may be ready to rock around the Christmas tree, but what if another would rather get coal in their stocking than sing in public? That’s okay! Nonsingers can still participate in caroling by ringing silver bells or handing out candy canes at the door. BRING GIFTS Small goodies like bottles of cider, homemade Christmas cookies, or candy canes are always sure to spread holiday cheer. KEEP THE PARTY GOING! After a night of singing your heart out, everyone deserves a treat. When you get back home, enjoy some traditional wassail or hot chocolate. Warm up, enjoy leftover cookies, and spend time with your loved ones. It takes a little planning to pull off a great caroling party, but don’t put too much pressure on yourself. Just try to have a good time. You don’t have to sound like a choir of angels to bring joy to the world.

PAIGE “On Christmas morning, my Mimi and grandpa come over to my parents’ house for breakfast and watch my brother and me open presents — even though we are in our 20s now! It’s my favorite part of celebrating the holiday season.”

LYDIA “The day after Thanksgiving, we immediately put up our tree and decorate it. We won’t take it down until after the new year starts. Otherwise, it’s bad luck!”

No matter what your favorite Christmas traditions are, we all hope that you are able to celebrate with your loved ones. From all of us here at Anderson Dental Care, merry Christmas and happy holidays!

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MULTICULTURAL CELEBRATIONS TEACH YOUR KIDS ABOUT WINTER HOLIDAYS

According to the Pew Research Center, Christmas is the most celebrated December holiday in the U.S. Yet, like the melting pot it is, the U.S. contains many cultures from across the globe, each with their own traditions. Teach your kids about some of the holiday celebrations from different cultures this season.

story of a miracle that happened during the rebellion, when a one- day supply of oil burned for eight days in a temple.

DIWALI

Though celebrated in late fall, Diwali is a Hindu holiday that’s known as the festival of lights. Its main purpose is to celebrate the triumph of good over evil, and the five-day festival includes the lighting of candles or lamps, feasting, and giving gifts to family and friends. Diwali also celebrates the Hindu new year and is the largest, most widely celebrated festival in India. This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but educating your children about holiday practices other than Christmas will give them a broader worldview and inspire them to gain further knowledge about cultures outside their own. Your local library is a great resource for children’s literature on these holidays, and there are also TV programs from PBS that feature episodes on these traditions. Enjoy the winter holiday season, however you decide to celebrate!

KWANZAA

Created in 1966 by black studies professor Maulana Karenga during the Black Nationalist Movement, Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration and reflection period for African Americans. The week offers African Americans the opportunity to connect with African culture and history by celebrating the seven principles of African heritage, which include unity, self-determination, and creativity.

HANUKKAH

Hanukkah pays homage to a two-year Jewish rebellion against an oppressive Greek-Syrian government that took them captive in an attempt to eliminate Judaism. The tradition of the eight-day celebration and the lighting of the menorah candles comes from the

BUTTERY ROASTED CHESTNUTS

SANTA IS COMING TO ANDERSON DENTAL CARE!

INGREDIENTS

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2 pounds fresh chestnuts, unpeeled

Join us for our annual Patient Christmas Party on Dec. 14 from 4–6 p.m. As always, Santa will join us for free pictures with the kiddos. He’ll visit with every child and give a gift to each family. You’re welcome to bring your own cameras too. We’ll also have some games, a craft for the kids, and

2–3 sprigs rosemary

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Pinch of freshly ground nutmeg Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted

2 teaspoons kosher salt, or more to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. Heat oven to 450 F. 2. Place a large sheet of foil on a rimmed baking sheet. 3. On a large, flat workspace, place chestnuts flat side down. Using a sharp knife, carve an X on the rounded side of each chestnut. 4. In a large bowl of hot water, soak chestnuts for 1 minute. 5. Pat dry and transfer to a medium bowl. Add rosemary, butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Toss to coat and transfer to baking sheet. Arrange in a single layer. Gather the edges of the foil together, leaving an opening at the top.

goodies for everyone to enjoy as we visit together. This event is free and open to the public, so please invite your friends and family. It’s sure to be a holly jolly Christmas party!

6. Roast until peels curl up, about 30–45 minutes. 7. Transfer to a platter and serve while hot or warm.

Inspired by Bon Appétit

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513-438-8152 WWW.ATOWNDENTAL.COM

ANDERSON DENTAL CARE Nathan Brooks, DDS, Inc.

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

7525 STATE RD, STE. A, CINCINNATI, OH 45255

SOME OF THE BEST (AND WORST) CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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THE ULTIMATE CHRISTMAS CAROLING CHECKLIST

HOW OUR TEAM MEMBERS CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS

TEACH YOUR KIDS ABOUT HOLIDAYS

BUTTERY ROASTED CHESTNUTS

FUN LOCAL EVENTS

WHAT TO DO IN CINCINNATI THIS MONTH FUN ACTIVITIES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

MACY’S DOWNTOWN DAZZLE When: Saturday, Dec. 8; 5:30 p.m. Where: Fountain Square Admission: Free

PNC FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS When: Dec. 1–31; 5–9 p.m.

NORTH POLE EXPRESS When: Dec. 13–16 and 20–24; 12–6 p.m. Where: Lebanon Mason Monroe Railroad Admission: Adults $24, seniors $19, children and infants are free Come aboard the North Pole Express for a whimsical winter train ride that the whole family can enjoy. During the hour-long journey, Santa and his elves will make their way through the train to visit with each family. Every child will receive a souvenir bell from Santa’s sleigh, a hot chocolate mug, and an official train ticket! There will also be balloon artists on board to

Where: Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden Admission: Adults $19 ($17 online), children and seniors $13 ($12 online), free under age 2 Bundle up with your loved ones and enjoy a merry stroll through the zoo amid a brilliant, festive display. Zoo lovers of all ages can share holiday cheer with some of our cold-weather animals on exhibit and a very special honored guest: Santa Claus! In addition to admiring the beauty of 3 million LED lights, visitors can watch a Madcap black-light

One of the best aspects of downtown Cincinnati during the holidays is the sheer amount of festive activities you and your family can enjoy without spending an absurd amount of money. You’ll find that in Fountain Square in particular, there’s plenty of fun to be had. You can start by spending time at the ice skating rink, then grab some hot cocoa from the coffee shops in the area. At 5:30 p.m., make sure to shift your gaze to the sky so you can watch Santa with his elf and reindeer friends rappel down the side of the Huntington Bank Center. After they reach their landing point on the Fountain Place rooftop, there will be a spectacular fireworks display!

puppet show, ride the BB&T Toyland Express, search for fairies in Fairyland, marvel at the spectacular Wild Lights show on Swan Lake, or snack at one of two S’mores ’n More stands.

make animals and toys for the children to play with. You are also encouraged to bring your own camera; pictures with Santa are allowed and encouraged!

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