PowerofYouth Student Leader Toolkit

W O R K I N G T O G E T H E R T O C R E A T E A W O R L D W H E R E

Student Leader Toolkit

U N D E R A G E D R I N K I N G E N D S , A N D L I V E S D O N ' T .

At MADD, we know that our hopes for a safer future are riding on you. Did you know that teen alcohol use kills about 4,300 people each year, more than all illegal drugs combined? By getting today’s youth off to a good start, we are taking a giant step toward fulfilling our vision of a nation without drunk driving. That's where you come in! We want to say THANK YOU! Thank you for taking a stand, setting the example and making the commitment not to drink until the age of 21 and to never ride with someone who has been drinking. MADD is excited to provide you this toolkit in order to help prevent underage drinking and the many lives lost as a result each year. The activities and information within this toolkit is great to use around Red Ribbon Week, Homecoming, sports games, fall festivals, parties and holiday breaks or Halloween. U S E Y O U R P O W E R . T A K E A S T A N D . P A R T N E R W I T H M A D D . Ending drunk driving begins with preventing underage drinking.

Included in this toolkit:

Know the facts!

Important facts about the dangers of underage drinking and marijuana use.

#ProtectUrSelfie

Healthy self-care tips that don't involve drugs or alcohol.

#ProtectUrFriends

How to know if your friend has a problem & what to do about it.

Be an example.

Show how you are coping in an alcohol- & drug-free way.

UN D E R A G E D R I N K I NG & MA R I J U A N A F A C T S

Teen alcohol use k i l l s about 4, 300 people each year - that ' s more then al l other i l legal drugs combined. [ 1 ] K ids who star t dr ink ing young are seven t imes more l i kel y to be in an alcohol-related crash. [2] High school students who use alcohol or other substances are f i ve t imes more l i kel y to drop out of school or bel ieve good grades aren ' t impor tant . [3] A rev iew of 48 relevant studies found mar i juana use to be associated wi th reduced educat ional at tainment (i .e. reduced chance of graduat ing). [4] Car crashes are the leading cause of death among young people aged 16-19 years . [5] Mar i juana negat i vel y af fects a number of sk i l l s requi red for safe dr i v ing, such as react ion t ime , coordinat ion , and concent rat ion. [6] Young people who begin dr ink ing at age 15 are s i x t imes more l i kel y to become alcohol dependent or abuse alcohol later in l i fe. [7] About 1 in 10 mar i juana users wi l l become addicted. For people who begin us ing mar i juana before the age of 18, that number r i ses to 1 in 6. [8] The brain i s not ful l y developed unt i l the ear l y 20s , and alcohol can cause long-term damage to a growing brain. [9] Mar i juana use di rect l y af fects the par ts of the brain respons ible for memory , learning at tent ion , deci s ion mak ing, coordinat ion emot ions and react ion t ime , especial l y for those who star t us ing as teenagers . [ 10]

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI). Atlanta, GA: CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/underage-drinking.htm;2 Hingson, Ralph, et al. “Age of Drinking Onset, Driving After Drinking, and Involvement in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes.” DOT HS 809 188. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, January 2001.; 3 National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Volume 1: Secondary School Students”, National Survey Results on Drug Use from The Monitoring the Future Study, 1975-1997. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services, 1998.; 4 Macleod J, Oakes R, Copello A, et al. Psychological and social sequelae of cannabis and other illicit drug use by young people: a systematic review of longitudinal, general population studies. Lancet Lond Engl. 2004;363(9421):1579-1588. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16200-4; 5 Teen Drivers: Get the Facts | Motor Vehicle Safety | CDC Injury center. http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/teen_drivers/teendrivers_factsheet.html. Published October 14, 2015. Accessed April 7, 2016.; 6 Hartman, R.L. and M.A. Huestis, Cannabis effects on driving skills. Clin Chem, 2013. 59(3): p. 478-92. 7 Hingson, Ralph, et al. “Age of First Intoxication, Heavy Drinking, Driving after Drinking and Risk of Unintentional Injury among US College Stu-dents.” Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 64 no 1 (2003), 23+.; 8 Lopez-Quintero, C, et al. (2011). Probability and predictors of transition from first use to dependence on nicotine, alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine: results of the national Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Drug Alcohol Depend. 115(1-2): p. 120-30; 9 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Alcohol and Public Health: Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI). Atlanta, GA: CDC, 2016. Available at: http://go.usa.gov/xkde2. 2017.; 10 Lenné MG, Dietze PM, Triggs TJ, Walmsley S, Murphy B, Redman JR. The effects of cannabis and alcohol on simulated arterial driving: Influences of driving experience and task demand. Accid Anal Prev. 2010;42(3):859-866. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2009.04.021;

# P RO T E C T UR S E L F I E Create positive ways to deal with stress that are alcohol- and drug-free.

Think through the situation. What do you feel you have control over and what do you feel is out of your control? What are other approaches to the problem that you can control? What potential opportunities could this situation create? Create a plan on how you will prepare for the future once you get past this situation. Focus on what you can control.

Exercise and get your body moving. Eat healthy, well-balanced meals. Get enough sleep. Take care of your body.

Take deep breaths. Science shows that repeating deep, slow breaths can help reduce anxiety and make you feel calmer.

Take care of your mind.

Journal. Writing things down can help relieve tension and help you sort through your thoughts. Focus on the good stuff! Take hold of positive thoughts and release the negative ones. Think about the opportunities and solutions versus the limitations and problems.

# P RO T E C T UR S E L F I E Create positive ways to deal with stress that are alcohol- and drug-free.

Talk about it.

You aren't the only one feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Talk about how you are feeling with your friends and family. Sometimes talking about something out loud and hearing another person's perspective can help shine light on a solution or different approach that you hadn't considered.

Spend time doing positive things.

Spend time doing your favorite hobby or start a new one! Show gratitude. Write a note or letter to someone you are grateful for and tell them why. Research shows that practicing gratitude is a helpful way to cope with stressful situations. Spend time with positive people. If a friend makes you anxious or makes you feel bad about yourself, take a break from that friend for a while.

Be an example.

Show your friends how you are coping with all this stress and pressure in a positive, alcohol- and drug-free way. Stress will always be there, but you have a choice on how you handle it. Share your strategies on social media and use #ProtectUrSelfie, #ProtectUrFuture and #PowerofYouth.

MAKE A PACT. MAKE A PLEDGE WITH YOUR FRIENDS TO NEVER DRINK ALCOHOL UNDER 21 OR USE MARIJUANA, ESPECIALLY AS A WAY TO COPE WITH STRESS. MAKE A PLAN. TALK THROUGH IDEAS OF ACTIVITIES YOU ENJOY, SKILLS YOU'D LIKE TO BUILD AND WAYS TO SPEND YOUR TIME THAT WORKS TOWARDS YOUR FUTURE, NOT AGAINST IT. PAY ATTENTION. KNOW THE WARNING SIGNS IF YOU THINK YOUR FRIEND MIGHT BE DRINKING OR USING MARIJUANA, THEN TALK TO A TRUSTED ADULT TO KEEP YOUR FRIEND SAFE. YOUR FRIEND MAY: - DROP OUT OF USUAL ACTIVITIES - ATTEMPT TO MASK THE ODOR OF ALCOHOL OR MARIJUANA - BECOME UNUSALLY AGGRESSIVE - HANG OUT WITH DIFFERENT FRIENDS AND MIGHT BE SECRETIVE - BE STRUGGLING WITH THEIR GRADES OR SKIPPING SCHOOL BE AN EXAMPLE. USE YOUR INFLUENCE ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND SHOW YOUR FRIENDS HOW YOU ARE COPING WITH STRESS IN A POSITIVE, ALCOHOL- AND DRUG-FREE WAY.

# P RO T E C T UR F R I E N D S

@MADD.Official @mothersagainstdrunkdriving @MADDOnline

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