Happy National Athletic Training Month

Health & Wellness • N E W S L E T T E R • Happy National Athletic Training Month!

with patient care. Were you an athlete in high school or college? You might have had to see your ATC for an injury during practice or at a game. Some other places ATCs work that might surprise you: •Hospitals

requirements and the type of patients they treat. Athletic Trainers must graduate from a Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Trainer Education (CAATE) accredited baccalaureate or master’s program. In addition to their studies in the classroom, an ATC performs clinical rotations to put their skills to the test. These could be in high schools, colleges, clinics or hospitals. Once they complete the undergraduate or master’s program, every athletic training student is eligible to sit for the national Board of Certification Exam. After they are certified and can officially put the letters ATC after their name, ATCs apply to become licensed to practice in their state of employment. Where do ATCs work?

This month is dedicated to spreading awareness about Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs), the environments in which they work and the importance of their role in rehabilitation. What are ATCs? According to the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, ATCs are highly qualified, multi- skilled healthcare professionals who collaborate with physicians, physical therapists, and other healthcare professionals in a variety of settings. ATCs can provide preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation to injuries and various medical conditions. Distinguishing an ATC’s Role ATCs are not personal trainers. While they can be confused with trainers, there is a big difference from the amount of education necessary to be a certified athletic trainer, their skills, job Meet the ATCs at LSTC Cierra Washington, ATC

•Working with professional and semi-professional athletes, including NASCAR and rodeo events •Treating performing artists, including Cirque du Soleil performers •Law enforcement and government agencies, such as NASA and the Pentagon •Factory, occupational and industrial settings for on-the-job ergonomics, bodymechanics and lifting safety as well as injury prevention

It might surprise you that ATCs don’t just work on the sidelines o f s p o r t i n g events. Here at Loudoun Sports Therapy Center, an outpatient orthopedic clinic, our ATCs work alongside our therapists to help

Brittany Browder, ATC, MA, CEIS Before coming to LSTC, I worked in the industrial setting. I was a contract athletic trainer for a large pharmaceutical company in Indianapolis, IN. I performed injury evaluations, prevention, education,

Tricia Walker, ATC, MA When I was in high school, I broke my leg playing softball. The injury happened even before we started playing games. I missed an entire competitive season. Going through the process of surgery and physical

I grew up playing sports and knew I wanted to pursue a career that combined medicine and athletics. In high school, I played basketball, softball and was a cheerleader, so I mademy fair share of trips tomy

athletic trainer. He gave me the opportunity to shadow himso I could get a better understanding of what ATCS do. That experience sealed the deal for me to make this my career.

therapy made me see the value in helping others get back to what they love. Now, as an athletic trainer, I can relate to the athletes and patients who have suffered an injury that limited their abilities. Helping them return to the level of competition they’re striving for is a driving force for me to keep doing what I’m doing.

and ergonomic evaluations to prevent office, lab andmanufacturing injuries. I also was in charge of programmanagement andworked closely with the company’s leadership to ensure employees had a good understanding of injury prevention and safe working environments.

21251 Ridgetop Circle Suite #140, Sterling, VA 20166 www.LoudounSportsTherapy.com 703-450-4300

Our Pat ient Spot l ight

“I CAN RETURN TO WHAT I LOVE MOST: CLASSICAL BALLET!” “I can go back to ballet! LSTC really worked with me on all levels: physically and mentally. I not only havemy strength back, I havemy confidence back as well and can jump and turn without hesitation. In addition to a very successful surgical experience, Cierra, Kate, Angie and Dr Devin and Trish all helped and encouraged me through an excellent rehab regimen, and now, less than 1 year after ACL reconstruction, I can return to what I love most: classical ballet. Thank you!” Penny has been dancing for 25 years. After tore her ACL, she came to LSTC for physical therapy both before and after her knee surgery. She worked hard and is back to doing what she loves; ballet!

Pat ient Resul ts

A GREAT TEAM HELPED ME GET BETTER! “My visit started due to a frozen shoulder. I had trouble retrieving my wallet from my back pocket. The pain prevented me from my weekly workouts. With the help of the great team of providers at Loudoun Sports Therapy Center, I can now move and workout without any pain. With some patience a great team is what helps us get better. Thanks to Angie and all of the others.” ~Milton K.

I WAS ABLE TO RUN A 5K!

MY ANKLES ARE MUCH MORE STABLE! “I don’t have to wear an ankle brace for daily activities. My ankles are much stronger and more stable which will helpwith hiking and snowboarding. I’m also walking farther distances without pain, which has severely decreased. Thank you for helping me strengthen my ankles so that my activities are not restricted.” ~Chelsea K.

I CAN EASILY WALK UP AND DOWN STAIRS!

“When I started at Loudoun Sports Therapy Center, I had a great deal of lower back, glute, thigh and calf pain and tightness. My mobility and ability to exercise and run was very, very limited. Over the weeks, the pain has decreased and my flexibility has increased - and my ability to exercise andworkout has dramatically improved! I even got through a 5K much to my own surprise.” ~Geoffrey H.

Prior to physical therapy, going about daily activities was challenging. Stairs were practically impossible. Now, I can easily walk up and down stairs, get in and out of my car and do other regular activities. I am excited to get back to my exercise routine! ~Margaret R.

21251 Ridgetop Circle Suite #140, Sterling, VA 20166 www.LoudounSportsTherapy.com 703-450-4300

• Q: I have noticed that I am having more headaches over the past two weeks. The pain seems to come frombehindmy head and upwards, even to my eyes. Is this something Physical Therapy can help? Ask a PT: Have a question about physical therapy, an injury or pain you’re experiencing? Getting older certainly has its perks! There’s retirement, more time for family events and activities, opportunities to travel, and the ability to finally sit back, kick your feet up for a while and let your hardwork pay off. Alongwith thosemany benefits, however, comes the challenge of remaining physically active. Inactivity increases with age. In fact, statistics show that roughly one third of people 65-years-old are physically active. That’s in contrast to the roughly 80 percent of the general population. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, folks over the age of 65 should be doing 150 minutes of exercise eachweek. This can be broken up into three 10-minute sessions of moderately intense exercises. Try incorporating the following stretches and exercises into your daily routine so you can start gradually improving your health and wellness. Stay Active at Any Age! Clinic News What’s happening at LSTC...

A. Scapular Squeezes 1. Sit up tall with shoulders upright 2. Pull your shoulders back 3. Hold that squeeze for 20 secs. 10 times. B. Bicep Curls 1.Starting Position 2.Bend elbows bringing your hands to your face 3.Repeat 10 reps for 2 sets C. Seated Marches Step 1: Sit upright in a chair. Step 2: Tighten your core. Step 3: Bring one knee straight up to your chest and slowly lower it back to the floor. **Perform 2 sets of 10 repetitions. D. Seated Kicks Step 1: Sit upright in a chair. Step 2: Tighten your core. Step 3: Straighten one leg out forward and slowly bring it back to the floor. Step 4: Repeat on the other leg. ** Perform 2 sets of 10 repetitions.

A.

B.

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D.

Refer someone to LSTC for physical therapy! When they come in for care and tell us you referred them, we will enter you into our drawing for a $50 gift card!

• A: Yes, it is something physical therapy can help. Your symptoms suggest it may be an occipital headache. The occipital muscles are a group of muscles located in the neck just under the back of your skull. These muscles connect the top two vertebrae to your head. Those muscles become irritated and tender and can sometimes radiate pain upwards. A physical therapist can do a thorough evaluation to assess if thismay be the cause of your pain. If it is, heat and stretching will be done as well as manual work to attempt at releasing those small occipital muscles. We’ll also educate patients on proper sitting posture as well as the importance of taking breaks from too much repetitive neck movement.

Every time we have 13 entries in the jar, we will draw a name for a $50 gift card. Then the game starts over. Play now for your chance to win and keep playing for more chances!

CONGRATS TO GREG GILES! Greg referred a brand new patient to LSTC and we drew his name in our recent raffle. He wins a $50 gift card. Congrats Greg and thank you for helping spread the work about LSTC!

Ask your question by posting it on our Facebook or twitter page.

21251 Ridgetop Circle Suite #140 Sterling, VA 20166 703-450-4300 www.LoudounSportsTherapy.com

Outpatient Physical Therapy Specializing In: Lower Back Pain • Neck Pain • Sciatica • Hip Problems • Shoulder Pain • Bursitis • Tendonitis • Frozen Shoulder Joint Pain and Replacements • Foot and Ankle Pain • Plantar Fasciitis • Knee Problems • Arthritis • Muscle Pains Sprains • Strains • Hand and Elbow Problems • Sports Injuries • Concussion Management Program Sports Performance Program • Return to Sport Program • Balance and Vestibular Problems • Other Conditions

Spring sports seasons are in full swing and summer leagues will be here before you know it. How can you make sure you are properly conditioned so that you avoid injuries that could sideline you for one game or the season? Spring sport seasons are in full swi g and summer l agues will b h re b f re you know it. How can you ma sure you are p operly conditioned so that you avoid njuries that could sideline y u for one game or the seaso

According to the National Children’s Hospital, 50 percent of sports-related injuries could have been avoided had the athletes completed an effective conditioning and training regimen before starting competition in their respective sport. When you are designing a training program, it’s important to look at these aspects:  Time table: when are you starting? According to the N tional Children’s Hospital, 50 percent f ports-related injuries could hav been avoide ad e athletes completed an effective c ditioni g and training r gim n before starting compet tion in their respective sport. When you are designing a trainin program, it’s important to look at thes a pects:  Tim tabl : wh n are you starting?

 Baseline of fitness  Movement skills  General conditioning principles  Sports-specific goals  The athlete’s physical capacity  Baseline of fitness  Movement skills  General c ditioning rinciples  Sports-specific goals  T athlete’ physic l capacity At LSTC, wh n we work with athletes to create a trainin program, we design the program around four ‘season’ of the sp 1. Post Season– The initial 1-3 mon hs aft the regul r season w n at lete as the opportunity to rest and r cup both mentally and physically. It also giv s athlet an scape to avoid burnout. 2. Off Season– Lasts about 4-6 mon hs aft r the post se son and focuses primarily o s rength, f exibility and e duranc decrease the risk of injury. Intense c ditioning should be performed 3 to 5 times a week. 3. Pre Season– Roughly 1 to 2 months before the regul r seas n, workouts begin to shift from s rength training to p specific c ditioning, agil ty drills and ovement skills to nsure athlete will perf rm optimally at the start of the sea 4. Regul r Season– This involves training 4 to 6 days a week to help maintain aerobic and anaer bic c ditioning to imp fitness level. During this time, weightlifting shoul b don twic a week. General Principles of Conditioning: 1. Warm Up/ C ol Down: Increase bl od flo to warm the muscles 2. Motivation: Ke p athle s int rested; G T CR ATIVE! 3. Overload: Wo k harder than normal o put good stress on the body, wh c will lp the body adapt and improve 4. Consistency: C ditioning regularly is effective 5. Progression: Gradually increase he intensity (reps/weights) to increase athlete’ physical ability 6. In ensity: Wo k harder f short periods of time 7. Specificity: Perform drills specific to athlete’s sport 8. Indiv duality: Design a program specific to the individual athlete 9. Minimize tre s: Push athle e but llow ad qua e rest 10. Safety: Use safe techniques and proper equipment At LSTC, when we work with athletes to create a training program, we design the program around four ‘season’ of the sport: 1. Post Season– The initial 1-3 months after the regular season when the athlete has the opportunity to rest and recuperate both mentally and physically. It also gives the athlete an escape to avoid burnout. 2. Off Season– Lasts about 4-6 months after the post season and focuses primarily on strength, flexibility and endurance to decrease the risk of injury. Intense conditioning should be performed 3 to 5 times a week. 3. Pre Season– Roughly 1 to 2 months before the regular season, workouts begin to shift from strength training to sports- specific conditioning, agility drills and movement skills to ensure the athlete will perform optimally at the start of the season. 4. Regular Season– This involves training 4 to 6 days a week to help maintain aerobic and anaerobic conditioning to improve fitness level. During this time, weightlifting should be done twice a week. General Principles of Conditioning: 1. Warm Up/ Cool Down: Increase blood flow to warm the muscles 2. Motivation: Keep the athletes interested; GET CREATIVE! 3. Overload: Work harder than normal to put good stress on the body, which will help the body adapt and improve 4. Consistency: Conditioning regularly is effective 5. Progression: Gradually increase the intensity (reps/weights) to increase the athlete’s physical ability 6. Intensity: Work harder for short periods of time 7. Specificity: Perform drills specific to the athlete’s sport 8. Individuality: Design a program specific to the individual athlete 9. Minimize stress: Push the athlete but allow adequate rest 10. Safety: Use safe techniques and proper equipment

Continued... It’s important for us to understand the individual athlete’s physical capacity and the sport for which they’re training. We would not work with a long distance runner on heavy weight squats like we would a sprinter simply because these two sports don’t require the same forces on the body. By tailoring each training program, we are helping develop each athlete’s ability to perform at the optimal level of competition. Continu It’s important for us to understand the individua athlete’s physical apacity the sp t for which they’re training. We would n t work with a long dista runner on heavy weight squats like we would a sp inter simply because these sports don’t requir the same forces on the bod . By tailoring each trai program, we are helping dev lop e c athlete’s ability to perform at the opti level of competition.

Do you or does someone you know:  Experience MUSCLE or JOINT PAIN during or after exercise or activity?  Have JOINT INSTABILITY when walking or exercising?  Experience CRACKING or POPPING of your JOINTS at any time?  Suffer from SWELLING in or around YOUR JOINTS at any time? Are you or is someone you know:  Training for an upcoming event or competition?  Beginning a new workout, training regimen, or exercise routine?  Suffering from any pain while in the middle of your sports season?  Suffering from pain or discomfort during the off-season of your sport?       Exp rience CRACKING or POPPING of your JOINTS at any time? Suffer from SWELLING in or around YOUR JOINTS at any time? re y u r is s me ne you know: Training f r an upc ming eve t or competitio ? Begin ing a new workout, t aining regimen, r exercise rout e? Suffering from any pain while in the middle of your sports season? Suffering f om pain or disco f rt during the off- eason o your sport? Do you or does someone you know:  o y u or d es someone you kn w: Exp rience MUSCLE or JOINT PAIN during o after exercise or activity? Have JOINT INSTABILITY when walking or exercising? Experience MUSCLE or JOINT PAIN du Have JOINT INSTABILITY when walkin Experience CRACKING or POPPING of Suffer from SWELLING in or around Y Are yo or is someone you know:  Training for an upcoming event or co Begin ing a new workout, training re Suffering from any pain while in the Suffering from pain or discomfort duri

Single Leg Squat Test  Stand on one leg (If you are uncertain of your balance, do this next to a counter)  Slowly squat down as if you were going to sit in a chair  Make sure your knee does not move forward or drift inward Can you do 15 of these on each leg without your knee moving inward or forward and without any knee pain or popping? Single Leg Squat Test  Stand o one leg (If you are unce  Slowly squat down as if you were  M ke sure your knee does not mo Can yo do 15 of these on each leg wi any knee pain or popping?

Core Test  or Test On your ha ds and knees, raise one arm and the opposite leg at the same time a e parallel with the fl or (You shoul b looking down and your head should with your shoulders) Make sure to not let your trunk and pe vis move at all an y u do 20 of th se on each side without letting your back sink towards the flo ips shift side to side? On your hands and knees, raise one arm and the opposite leg at the same time so both are parallel with the floor (You should be looking down and your head should be even with your shoulders)  Make sure to not let your trunk and pelvis move at all Can you do 20 of these on each side without letting your back sink towards the floor or your hips shift side to side?  Make sure to not let your trunk and pelvi Can you do 20 of these on each side without hips shift side to side? Core Test  On your hands and knees, raise one arm are para lel ith the floor (You should b with your shoulders)

Burpee Test  Start in standing position with your feet together  Get down on your hands and kick your feet back behind you, placing you in push-up position  Do one push-up, then explode back up into the air Are you able to complete 10 of these without pain or instability? Burpee Test   

Start in standing Get down on yo you in push-up

Do one push-up Are you able to com

Shoulder Mobility Test  Start with arms extended out to your sides; hands should be in a fist  Slowly reach one hand behind your back while reaching the other hand over your shoulder and down your back  Have a friend take note of the distance between your fists  Repeat these arm movements in the opposite direction Are your fists within one hand length (see figure B)? Do you have pain with either of these movements or do you have a large distance between your fists (see figure C)?    Repeat these arm movements in the opp Are your fists wit in one hand length (see fig with i her of these movements or do you ha your fists (see figure C)? houlder Mobility Test Start with arms extended out to your sid s; hands sh uld be in a fist Slowly reach one h nd behind y u back while reac ing the other hand over your sho lde and down your back Have a friend take no e of the dist nc between y ur fists Repe t these arm movem nts in the opposite directio re you f sts within one hand length (see figure B)? Do you have pain ith eith r of the e movements or do you ha e a large di tance between our fists (see f gure C)? Fi Figure A Figure B Figure C Shoulder Mobility Test  Start wit arms extended out to your sid Slowly rea h one hand behind your back hand over your shoulder and down your Have a friend take note of the distance b

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