StoryLine Issue No. 2 Fall 2020

ISSUE 2 FALL 2020

our staff

Editor-in-chief Oceana Callum

Kristen Nichols

Nonfiction Editor

Charles Ardinger Marilyn Brock Kristen Nichols

Fiction Editors

Oceana Callum

Poetry Editor

Oceana Callum

Art & Photography Editor

Christopher Mefford

Cover Photo and Stained Glass Window

Luis Morales

Logo/Nameplate Design

DawnWilson Amy Severns

Marketing & Design Assistance

Christopher Johnston

Accessibility Guru

Stephanie Bridges Marilyn Brock Linda Carpenter KimVolmer

Special thanks to the 2019-2020 Crux Essay Contest Volunteer Faculty Judges

please see next page SUBMI SS IONS

This issue of StoryLine is made possible by a grant from the Coast Community College District Foundation and with the support of Coastline's English Department, with special thanks to Dana Emerson Views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in the magazine belong solely to the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Coastline College or any of its employees.

Submission Guidelines and Genres: SUUBBMMIIT

StoryLine is published once a year, in the fall semester Submissions are accepted all year long, with decisions made in the late summer Art : This genre may include drawings, paintings and graphic designs. Scan desired images and send in high-resolution, .jpg format. Photography : Send up to 5 images in high-resolution, .jpg format. Poetry : Send up to 5 poems in one or multiple Word documents (.docx or .doc) or PDFs. Essays and Short Stories: 2,500 words maximum as a Word document (.docx or .doc) or PDF. Digital Stories : Send a link to a YouTube video (must be correctly captioned). Please send your submission, along with the genre in which you are submitting, to Oceana Callum: ocallum@gapps.coastline.edu by July 1 for consideration in that year's issue

FALL 2020 SPECIAL ISSUE

CONTENTS

On the Cover: CHRISTOPHER MEFFORD, "Stained Glass Distractions"

07 08 10 16

Liv McNeil, "Numb"

L E T I T H A P P E N, "Westcoast Legends"

Haejung, "BJJ Couple: Two Cartoons"

Amy Severns, "Unsheltered Creativity"

Amy Severns, My Uyen Truong and Katherine Vo, "Creative Fruit"

20-22

Special Programs: Beginning Instrumental, Keyboard, and Vocal Classes, "Born This Way"

23 25-26, 57

Andrea Mendoza, "Under Quarantine," "Perseverance through Adversity," and "There Is Light"

2019-2020 CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER: Christina Patron, "Food Insecurity in the U.S."

27 33

Bethany Diment, "Forever Bond"

35 40 42 43 44 45-53

David Gonzalez, "Faces for Thought"

Duane Ratzlaff, "Passionfruit"

Lisa Dupuy, "Three Pandemic Haikus"

Alyssa Nambiar, "Takeout Menu"

Tim Davies, "My Father on the Feather"

Sydney Ho, "Acrylic Painting #1, #3, #5"

2019-2020 CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER: Joanna Tang, "At What Cost?"

47 57

2019-2020 CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER: Albina Emelina, "Public Opinion on Working Mothers and their Relationships with their Children"

ON THE COVE R , "STAINED GLASS DIST R ACTIONS"

Originally from Huntington Beach, California, Chris has taught ESL part time at Coastline College for 13 years and leads the Study Abroad @ the Beach program at CSU, Long Beach. After receiving his Bachelor's degree in philosophy from CSULB in 1996, he moved to Japan to begin his teaching career. A deeper dive into the world of TESL brought him back to CSULB for a Masters in Linguistics in 2001. Not finished with Japan, Chris lived there five more years studying Aikido and the Shakuhachi flute. Coastline College brought him on to create a number of customized ESL programs, including an online Communication Strategies course based on his co-authored textbook: "Take Care: Communicating in English with U.S. Health Care Workers." He has taken on the tradition of stained glass artwork from his father, who instructed the art in Orange County for 30+ years. In addition to this all-consuming hobby, Chris studies the Japanese bamboo flute on occasion and continues his 35-year passion of surfing.

CHRISTOPHER MEFFORD

contributor bios

HELLO

A S F E A T U R E D I N T H E HU F F I NG T ON PO S T , W I T H MOR E T H AN 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 V I EWS ON YOU T U B E , L I V MCN E I L H A S G I V E N U S S P E C I A L P E RM I S S I ON T O P U B L I S H H E R V I R A L V I D E O H E R E :

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A S F E A T U R E D I N T H E HU F F I NG T ON PO S T , W I T H MOR E T H AN 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 V I EWS ON YOU T U B E , L I V MCN E I L H A S G I V E N U S S P E C I A L P E RM I S S I ON T O P U B L I S H H E R V I R A L V I D E O H E R E :

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PHENOMENAL DANCE GROUP L E T I T H A P P E N SISTERS NORAH, YARAH, AND ROSA DANCE TO "WESTCOAST LEGENDS," APPEARING HERE BY SPECIAL PERMISSION LET IT HAPPEN HAS APPEARED ON STAGE WITH JUSTIN BIEBER, BEEN FEATURED TWICE ON THE ELLEN DEGENE R ES SHOW AND ARE NOW ON THE DISNEY CHANNEL ." THE SISTERS—NORAH, YARAH AND ROSA—ARE TAKING ON THE WORLD ALL THE WAY FROM THE NETHERLANDS WITH THEIR ENERGETIC DANCE BLEND OF HIP HOP AND FUNK." (GIRLSLIFE.COM) “'BRINGING LOVE WHERE THERE IS HATE, BRINGING FAITH WHERE THERE ARE DOUBTS AND BRINGING LIGHT WHERE THERE IS DARKNESS…' LET IT HAPPEN HAS A DESIRE TO INSPIRE PEOPLE, YOUNG AND OLD, WITH THEIR PERFORMANCES AND BRING INNER POSITIVE CHANGES." FOLLOW THEM AT HTTPS://WWW.INSTAGRAM.COM/NORAH_YARAH_ROSA/

contributor bios

HAEJUNG, BJJ COUPLE, NEXT PAGE

Haejung is a 2nd-time contributor to StoryLine . Her series, BJJ Couple, tells the story of an American expat and her Korean boyfriend. Follow Haejung on Instagram @soyhaejung.

About BJJ Couple: 2 Cartoons BJJ is an inside joke. It's the initials for the romanization of the Korean word boojukjul, or "inappropriate." Korean letters are written in syllabic blocks, and words are abbreviated by using the first letter of each syllabic block. The series is titled "BJJ Couple" because intercultural love and communication are major themes. BJJ is not a real term, but a creation of the characters using a mix of their native languages - English and Korean.

"Nightly Call": A Cartoon by Haejung

"Nightly Call": A Cartoon by Haejung

"Chu Chu": A Cartoon by Haejung

"Chu Chu": A Cartoon by Haejung

"Chu Chu": A Cartoon by Haejung

Amy Severns is a Digital Graphic Applications student. She is currently working towards her Digital Media Design certificate at Coastline, and plans to continue on her path to an associate and/or bachelor’s degree in the digital arts. She has been a creative since childhood in multiple mediums, from music and dance, to writing and digital arts. She also has over 15 years of visual merchandising and display experience. She currently lives in Anaheim and enjoys going to concerts, attending conventions, and, when in the mood for a more quiet evening, staying in and reading a good book or watching a movie with her boyfriend and 3-year-old cat.

AMY SEVERNS, "UNSHELTERED CREATIVITY," NEXT PAGE

"Unsheltered Creativity": Series of Sepia (plus Blue Filter) Photos "Creative Fruit": Student artwork painted using the mixer brush in Adobe Photoshop During our COVID-19 Quarantine, Professor Angela Gomez- Holbrook adjusted the assignments for the Coastline DGA 131/Art 212 Digital Photo course to allow for safe shelter-in-place and quarantine indoor photography solutions. The first assignment included interesting compositions of indoor house plants. With a weekly ConferZoom discussion plus study resources, students learned to crop with the "rule of thirds" and use Photoshop to emulate several traditional, color-toning effects—like Sepia tone—that photographers have previously achieved in the darkroom. These samples are from student work by Amy Severns, who wears multiple caps as our Coastline marketing department intern, as well as from My Uyen Truong and Katherine Vo. THE COASTLINE CLASS THAT INSPIRED "UNSHELTERED CREATIVITY" AND "CREATIVE FRUIT"

C R E A T I V E F R U I T

BE BRAVE

Special Programs: Beginning Instrumental, Keyboard, and Vocal Classes

Beth Syverson: I teach music classes in Coastline Special Programs, and my students have intellectual disabilities. Last spring, like so many others, my music classes suddenly became Zoom classes. We made the best of it and had fun recording "Born This Way" under quarantine and creating a "virtual choir" type video.

PREVIOUS PAGE,

"BORN THIS WAY"

Born and raised in Fountain Valley, Andrea Mendoza is a graduate of Coastline College and Cypress College, having majored in dance, business, and radiologic technology. While studying for a career in medical imaging, Andrea immersed herself in art and philosophy courses from all the Coast District campuses. She has been showcasing her artwork and performing with dance companies since 2014, along with acting and writing. She created her art brand online, Andy V Renditions, with hopes of launching a future scholarship foundation. Andrea works as a lead technologist for the radiology department at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, California. ANDREA MENDOZA, "UNDER QUARANTINE," NEXT PAGE AND "PERSEVERANCE THROUGH ADVERSITY," PHOTO P. 26

SCRAGGLY , SLUMBER ING TREE , DI STORTED AND GNAWED, PALLOR OF FROZEN S I LVER , STANDING IN A DESERT OF WHI TE . I GR I P I TS L IGNEOUS ARM, F I RMLY WI TH RUGGED CLAWS , GOLDEN EYES BEHOLD A DESOLATE , SNOWY S IGHT . DROPS OF HAI L ENERVATE , DESCENDING OVER MY WINGS , INVI S IBLE ORNAMENTS , FROM MY CAREWORN BRANCH HUNG. THEY GLOW BLUE IN THE WINTER DUSK , ICICLE DR I PP INGS , EARS ARE L I STENING FOR A SWEET SONG, NOT YET SUNG. U N D E R QU A R A N T I N E

WE BIDE T IME UNT I L DAWN’ S CRACK OF CRUSTAL DAYL IGHT , FOR WHEN THE VE INS OF THE SUN MAY WARM US . TO POUR HOPE INTO THE COLD INDIGO HEART OF TWI L IGHT , I AM BUT A SNOWY OWL IN THE SKY , STAR OF THESE COSMOS , AND I DREAM TO FLY FREE . FOR THI S OBS IDIAN FOREST I S A HAUNTED CAVERN, PER I SHED AND GREY , HOME TO THE GHOSTS OF L IVING THINGS THAT ONCE WALTZED TOGETHER . BUR I ED THORNS AND FLOWER STEMS , INSENT I ENT , AND LONG DECAYED, A PEACEFUL S I LENCE NESTLES , RUFFL ING MY FEATHERS .

A N D R E A V . M E N DO Z A

PERSEVERANCE THROUGH ADVERSITY Andrea Mendoza

CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER 2019 - 2020

FOOD INSECURITY IN THE U.S.

BY CHR I S T I NA PATRON CAT EGORY : PERSUAS I VE E S SAY

WR I T T EN FOR OCEANA CA L LUM ' S ENGL I SH 1 0 2 C L AS S , FA L L 2 0 1 9

After raising her six children , Christina Patron attended and graduated from Golden West Community College . She is transferring to the University of Irvine to obtain her Bachelor ’ s Degree in Psychological Science . She resides in Huntington Beach where she enjoys spending time with her family . She has a passion for writing : poetry , screenplays , young adult fiction , and children ’ s books . She loves reading , wine tasting , relaxing on the beach , and spending time with her children and her three grandchildren .

Informing Americans about the effect food

insecurity has on many people and the urgency of

eradicating this problem will motivate them to

action ; hence , people will pressure local

governments to provide necessary programs

through effective policies , and individuals will work

Food insecurity affects communities everywhere in the

together within their communities to make food

more accessible .

United States and is the leading cause of hunger and

malnutrition . It affects those of all ages – from children ,

The United States Department of Agriculture

teens , and young adults , to the elderly . Currently , over 42

( USDA ) has been aware of the ongoing problem of

million people in America are affected , of which thirteen

food insecurity that has plagued America since the

million are children , according to a survey by the United

Great Depression . However , it is yet to be resolved .

States Department of Agriculture ( USDA ) ( Ward ). There are

The USDA defines food insecurity as , “ a household -

many contributing factors to this ongoing problem , and

level economic and social condition of limited or

many potential solutions have been tried . However , one of

uncertain access to adequate food ” ( Ward ). This

the largest contributors to combating this problem is being

inadequate or unequal food distribution stems from

targeted by budget cuts . Moreover , many people living in the

the gap between the low wages of the poor and the

U . S . are unaware of the threat to programs and do not

high cost of living . This gap should be bridged

realize their voice can have an impact on the solution .

through government benefits ; however , many

Another problem is food waste in the public schools ,

policies fall short in meetings the needs of the

which I have witnessed first - hand . Most people do not

people ( Nestle ). Nationally , one in eight households

is affected , which is inexcusable in a first - world

realize that many schools throw any uneaten food into the

dumpsters instead of it being donated to those in need .

country . Food insecurity leads to hunger

CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER 2019 - 2020

and malnutrition ; moreover , it affects the overall well - being

SNAP ( Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program ) is the

of the individual . Those who are the most vulnerable are the

largest antihunger program implemented by the U . S .

children and the elderly . One in six children exhibit

Government , and has helped families access food for many

problems with behaviors , delays in their development , and

years . In 2017 , it helped 3 . 4 million Americans to overcome

an increased risk of developing chronic illnesses ( Ward ).

poverty , providing them with healthy food . This program is

David Beckmann , the President of Bread for the World , says

crucial in helping to improve the health of many

“ the U . S . has the worst infant mortality rate among

Americans . Although this program is protected from

developed countries ” ( Banks ).

being completely eradicated by the Farm Bill , there are

This is an outrage that any child in America should perish

lobbyists and congressional representatives who oppose

from malnutrition . In adults , malnutrition can result in heart

“…THERE SHOULD BE AS MUCH ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE ECONOMIC AND HUMAN COSTS OF FOOD INSECURITY AS TO A COMPARABLE BREAKOUT IN INFECTIOUS DISEASE.”

disease , hypertension , stroke , and developmental and

behavioral health issues (" Food Waste …"). In many cases ,

those facing hunger resort to eating inexpensive and

unhealthy foods . Oftentimes , this results in obesity and

malnutrition . They fill up on empty calories and do not

consume the necessary nutrients required to lead healthy

lives . This also makes it difficult to function in society and do

basic things like going to work or going to school . According

to a Christian advocacy group , “ Hunger and food insecurity

are so widespread in the United States that they add $ 160

billion to national health care spending ” ( Banks ). These

unnecessary costs could be eliminated through investing in

effective programs to combat malnutrition .

– SARAH JANE SCHWARZENBERG

Although there are current programs helping those in

need , the problem is far from being resolved or eradicated .

Existing programs such as WIC , SNAP , and public school

breakfast programs have been beneficial in helping

this epidemic . There are also free lunch programs in schools

that have helped to increase attendance , concentration , and

focus in students and reduce tardiness and visits to the

nurse ’ s office ( Galvin ). Nevertheless , the cuts in the Food

Assistance Program , the Food and Nutrition Education

Program , the Temporary Emergency Food Assistance

Program , and many other programs , along with the high

cost of food , have become an obstacle for families to access

nutritious food (" Hunger and Malnutrition in the U . S ."). Not

only is there a need to reinstate certain programs , but there

is also a need to develop new government policies to

advocate for federal nutrition programs . The program

CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER 2019 - 2020

I wondered if there was a law responsible for their unwillingness to reduce this ongoing food waste. As it turns out, the Federal Government does not stipulate in what circumstances that food is allowed to be donated. Consequently, very few states have laws regulating the donation of food (Food Safety Legislation 2018). An article states , “ California ’ s SB 557 allows for unused food

it and are trying to enact steep budget cuts . Representatives

fear that Americans are taking advantage of the SNAP

program , and are idle and lazy , not willing to strive for

financial independence . ( Nestle , " The Supplemental

Nutrition Program …"). It states in the article , " Children ’ s

Rights and the Politics of Food : Big Food Versus Little

People ," “ President Trump ’ s budget not only called for $ 193

billion in cuts to SNAP over the next ten years , it also would

terminate SNAP ’ s status as a national program … It would also

cut WIC funding for pregnant and nursing mothers and their

children by $ 188 million and totally defund the Farmers

Market Nutrition Program " ( Woodhouse ). These cuts will hurt

millions of families across America . Americans should be

or food returned by a consumer at schools to be donated to

educated about these matters , especially if it affects them

a food bank or other nonprofit charity ” (" Food Safety

directly . They should vote for the politicians who will

Legislation 2018 "). It ’ s unfortunate that most California

advocate and protect the struggling families and write

schools have not implemented any sort of program to

letters to representatives and to Congress . Unfortunately ,

reduce the amount of waste that occurs .

without effective programs and policies in place , many will

Fortunately , there is one individual who is making a

continue to go hungry and will suffer the health

difference in Alameda County . Nancy Deming , the

consequences of malnutrition — or even die .

sustainability manager for custodial and nutritional services

Another large contributing factor to food insecurity

for the Oakland School District , has transformed the schools

is that , even though the U . S . produces more than enough

in the district . She has devised a program to throw produce

food to feed everyone in America , food goes to waste . It is

that has been partially eaten into a compost bin , to put non -

said that , “ the United States wastes up to 40 percent of

eaten food in the share bin — separating into cold foods , hot

its food supply . This disconnect results in approximately 125

foods , and produce — and giving the rest of the food to a local

to 160 billion pounds of wasted food every year ” (" Food

hunger - relief organization . Deming has successfully

Waste …"). Can you imagine how many lives could be saved if

implemented this program and is responsible for reducing

all that wasted food was made available to the hungry ? As

the amount of food that would have typically been wasted .

mentioned earlier , from my own personal experience

The USDA now endorses this program ( Bloom ). The need for

working at an elementary school , food is wasted on a daily

individuals to get involved and advocate for similar

basis . According to an article in The Daily , “ The USDA ’ s

programs throughout the United States is crucial in

National School Lunch Program serves 30 million kids

reducing food insecurity . Awareness and action will help

every school day … but the program also wastes about $ 5

provide food that would have normally been wasted to

million worth of edible food every school day ” ( Bloom ). It ’ s

hungry families . In addition , establishments such as markets

horrifying to watch . I see fresh produce , hot lunches , and

and grocery stores should not be allowed to throw away

unopened milk tossed into the trash can on a daily

food that has not gone bad but may not appear aesthetically

basis . As I confronted the Principal , she informed me that no

pleasing , making it difficult to sell . Instead of discarding the

one is allowed to remove the food from the premises , even if

produce , establishments should donate to food banks or be

it is to be donated to needy families .

CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER 2019 - 2020

given to sell at a lower price at the local farmers market . It ’ s

the problem is finding sufficient ways for people to access

these products . In addition , there has been minimal research

the responsibility of everyone who witnesses these wasteful

practices to help in putting a stop to it . If more people were

done on biofortified foods and the long - term effects are

made aware of these ongoing issues , the chances of help

unknown . There are benefits to this method , but it ’ s proven

and support would increase , and important changes would

that there are also risks . Using biofortified foods in the

be made .

United States should not be the main solution for food

insecurity .

The answer to food insecurity and eradicating hunger

and malnutrition is not an easy one and many people look

The problem of food insecurity is one that will not be

away from the issue , feeling they cannot make an impact .

solved immediately . It has been an ongoing concern for

Nevertheless , the problem needs to be addressed by the

many years – not only nationally , but also internationally .

whole of America , the wealthy and the poor . People can get

People are suffering from hunger and malnutrition around

involved in their communities to help . Organizations within

the globe and are in need of help . No one should have to

communities — for - profit or non - profit — can help to organize

suffer from lack of basic needs such as food . According to

food drives , food banks , and soup kitchens ; offer

the article , " Hunger in America : A Matter of Policy ," “ An ideal

educational programs on nutrition ; and create gardens

diet provides sufficient energy and essential nutrients to

within their communities . Individuals can develop new

meet physiological requirements , maximize growth and

skills , become involved socially , and work together with

longevity , and prevent nutrient deficiencies as well as

conditions of nutritional excess and imbalance ; it should

others within their communities to improve their lives and

their food security . In addition , cash donations — especially

also be obtained from foods that are available , affordable ,

from wealthier individuals or organizations — are helpful in

and palatable ” ( Nestle ). Food is a right that everyone should

have . The continuation of effective government programs ,

running these facilities and can help to pay for the utilities

and tools needed . Americans are responsible for becoming

the implementation of new ones , and organizations

educated in these matters ; the more aware they are

proactively reaching out to communities and helping to

educate and get citizens involved , will help to eliminate

of the ongoing hunger problems within their own

communities , the more willing they will be to contribute in

hunger and malnutrition caused by food insecurity and will

a positive way .

help to make America thrive . The food insecurity problem in

One solution that is being considered and researched is

the United States is not only the responsibility of the

called Biofortified crops . These crops are the hope of some

government , but also of the people .

to combat this problem of hunger , or what ’ s known as

" hidden hunger ." This is when people eat enough food to

Works Cited page 61 - 62

survive , filling up on food with little to no micronutrients ,

and incur health problems or malnutrition as a result .

Scientists genetically modify these crops by adding more

essential vitamins and minerals to them , thereby giving

people a better chance of staying healthy ( Kesavan and

Swaminathan ). This is a good solution for developing

countries , as the majority of crops they grow are rice , wheat ,

and others that are low in nutrients . Here in the United

States , healthy foods are more readily available . However ,

Psst! Did you know we have a food pantry helping students fuel their studies? It's called Coastline Cares.

please see next page for info.

COASTLINE CARES

We have made the Coastl ine Food Pantry check-in process easier! Please fi l l out the Coastl ine Cares Pantry RSVP Form before your next visit. We wi l l save the information for future visits. When you arrive to pick up your food, just show us a copy of your RSVP form and be on your way. REMEMBER: THE COASTLINE PANTRY HAS MOVED! 2 New Locations Mondays: 11am - 1pm Coastl ine’s Garden Grove Campus 12901 Eucl id Street Garden Grove, CA 92840 Fridays: 11am – 1pm Coastl ine’s Newport Beach Campus 1515 Monrovia Avenue Newport Beach, CA 92663 ORDER AND PICKUP INSTRUCTIONS: Complete this Coastl ine Cares Pantry RSVP Form. Arrive on Mondays at Garden Grove or Fridays at Newport Beach between 11am and 1pm. Have your Pantry RSVP form handy and pop your trunk.We wi l l del iver food to your trunk, fol lowing 6 feet social distancing guidel ines. Looking forward to seeing you!

I 'm Bethany Diment from Orange County. Photography has been a quiet passion for me. Just like dance, there are moments that capture our emotions. I believe this art is worth the time because it's always something to look back on. I have been taking pictures for a few years. I prefer the landscapes, still life and plants. There is beauty within the little things. In fact, I participated in another art submission called "Look Within" run by the PTA. This upcoming school year, I ' ll be a junior at Early College Highschool. I also am in yearbook because it's an elective that brings a side hobby into a daily routine.

PHOTO CRED: "FOREVER BOND" PREVIOUS PAGE BETHANY DIMENT

contributor bios

contributor bio

david gonzalez, "faces for thought , " previous pages

As before in the first edition of StoryLine , I wanted to express human expression and shadows. In this next chapter, I focus on various facial expressions, detail, and color. Finally, I am glad to know that my work was enjoyed by many. Some of my artwork recently was donated to Children's Hospital in Los Angeles for those children that have been suffering from covid-19, but also for the adults as well. Art has a way of taking away grief and often changing a person/s thought process and replacing it with happy thoughts. In the end, whatever it takes to make someone else's life better, works for me.

FUTURE EDITIONS OF STORYLINE outstanding exper ience looks great on your resume emai l ocal lum@gapps.coast l ine.edu for more info.

PASSIONFRUIT

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HUNT I NGTON BEACH WI TH H I S WI F E AND TWO OF H I S FOUR ADUL T CH I LDREN .

Week 1, Spring Semester, 2020 “How was your first day, Tri?” Just after 4 pm on a Monday in late January, we were sitting in the living room of my family’s crackerbox. Desperate for a study break, I sat on our glider that had stopped gliding. Tri was slumped on the couch, a rescued dumpster sofa hiding underneath a tattered red and black Mexican blanket that Grandma had bought second hand when we got here in ‘08. Tri’s Nike hoodie reached almost to his knees. He was cold. Stiff 501s stretched to Tri’s Jordans, propped up—a double no-no in our house—on what once was an elegant Ethan Allen mahogany coffee table. Grandma had left the room with the TV tuned to one of Channel 57’s Vietnamese stations, all of them sounding the same to my ears because my Vietnamese had slipped badly. She chided me for that—until Tri arrived. My winter quarter at UCI had begun Jan. 2. Coastline students always came back six weeks after the end of the fall semester. Nice. I missed that long break. “Trying to think of the right thing to say. Maybe good.” “Wait. You said you didn’t want to be here and would do your best to get kicked out and sent home. As soon as possible. Now your first day of classes was ‘good’?” I couldn’t believe my ears. “Maybe I change mind, Trang.” Like a leopard changes spots. “So who do you have for Reading/ Writing/ Grammar?” “Mr. F.” “Ha! He’s really tough, but I loved him. How about Listening and Conversation, your afternoon class?” “It a woman. Can’t remember name.” “Yeah, everybody’s name isn’t as easy to remember as Mr. F . How about the other students? Any hot girls?”

I knew cousin Tri well enough by now to understand his priorities, even though he’d been in the country for only a few weeks—just long enough to complain about everything, from the “weak” Nem Nuớng Cuốn at Brodard to the “weak” Tet celebration on Bolsa. “Low-key.” “What’s her name, or their names?” “Just one. Hien.” “Morning or afternoon?” “Both.” “Bomb!” Week 5, Spring Semester, 2020 “Wondering what's on your mind, it must be hard to be that fine Hold on, I got to start this mutha—” “Tri! Do you know what you’re saying?” Tri was repeating the Drake lyrics grinding out of his EarPods, loud enough for me to know what he was listening to. “‘Course I know, Trang. You think I stupid?” I was sitting in the glider. Tri was lying on the couch, in socks now, after Grandma had ripped into him when he both wore his Nikes in the house and parked them on the coffee table. Tri was multitasking, bumping along with the tracks in his ears and texting with his iPhone 11 Pro. I was surprised to see him out of his bedroom. “What happened, Tri? Internet out?” “What?” I shouted: “What happened, Tri? Internet out?” Tri ejected the Pods. “You funny, Trang. I give you all break and you look my beautiful face.” Unfortunately, Tri was right. He could thank my aunt. She was gorgeous, 63 wearing 43. “Must be a coincidence that Grandma’s just about finished her bun bo.” “Actually, I thinking going out to eat.” “Sorry. I’ve got homework.” I knew Tri didn’t want me along, but I liked to mess with him. “Did you ever get a

“Not for a lack of trying.” “No. I started out Fs on all tests in Mr. F’s class. What kind name that for teacher, anyway?” “His name is Fadenreicht , OK? He’s doing you a favor.” “I know. He my teacher. He probably not even pronounce his own name. That why he Mr. F.” “He’s a great teacher.” “For you, maybe. Me . . . I just want come home. See friends. Hang out in clubs with girls. Stuff like that.” “Goal oriented.” “I thought for sure I can get kick out when we start Zooming. I was plan Zoombomb Mr. F’s class.” “You’re awful.” “Yeah, I putting together cool video. But I too late. Mr. F went to 100 trainings in spring break and now can stop me and all Zombers.” “My teachers didn’t get much training. The other day my Post-Colonial Lit teacher accidentally shared his Zoom screen and we all saw him shirtless, running his fat belly to the back of his apartment to escape his webcam and find a shirt, clean or not.” “I wish—” “So you’re still in the class?” “Ha! Not take much. Mr. F and all teachers desperation—” “Desperate. Are desperate .” “Desperation to keep students.” Hopeless. “Did you ever consider the fact that maybe Mr. F and all the Coastline teachers might just be extra compassionate right now?” “ Compassionate like passion ? Anyway, what I do if I kick out? I no can fly home.” “There are a few flights.” “Right. When I land, army take my bag, put me in dormitory for 14 days. Prison.” It was hard to keep from laughing. Tri was getting what he deserved. Here he was, sitting at home, our home, with his own room and my mom and grandma cooking for him and doing all his laundry while he played League of Legends all night and only got up before noon two mornings a week. By now he couldn’t even find his textbooks in his room, though he didn’t spend much time looking for them. Grandma shuffled through the kitchen in her orange and black polka dot robe and fluffy pink slippers on her way to the backyard. “Chào buổi tối, cậu bé lười biếng.” Grandma kept moving, out the kitchen door and on her way to water her precious passion fruit tree, her once-a-week chore. She was fortunate that we had lots of sunshine in our yard. “I couldn’t quite catch that, Tri. What did she say?” “Good evening, lazy boy.” That’s what I thought. Hien was the only reason Tri got up Monday and Wednesday mornings to join Mr. F’s Zoom meetings. Not that he could do anything about her, what with the quarantine and the transition to online classes. He texted her. That was it. And she ignored his texts. Like she didn’t turn on her video during the Zoom sessions. When his initial texts got no replies, he switched to asking her about homework assignments. She fell for it at first but then went silent again when she realized Tri and homework weren’t on speaking terms. Hien wanted to be a pharmacist. Exchanging flirty texts with Tri wasn’t on the Coastline counselor’s educational plan for her. Or, more importantly, her parents’. “What happening Sunday, Trang?” “Not much. Why?” “It Easter, right?” “Yeah, but all the churches are closed. My Lutheran

date with that hot girl in your grammar class, tryin’ to make a rebel of the careless man’s careful daughter?” “Passionate from miles away. Trying to think of the right thing to say. How the boyfriend, Trang?” “Tri, it’s fun talking to you—or your idol—but I’ve got to get ready for my lab tomorrow.” “What your class?” “Biopharmaceutics and Nanomedicine.” “Two classes.” “One.” I left the living room and went back to my bedroom to study. Before I finished Coastline and transferred to UCI, I had no idea how tough it would be. I learned right away. So I studied. And studied. To tell the truth, I was jealous of Tri. His family back in Vietnam had a lot of money. Not like my family. My dad was working at Chipton-Ross in Anaheim as an electronics assembler, and my mom was doing nails at Nailed It during the week and cooking for Pho-Out on the weekend. The family bottom line did get me aid at UCI, though. Free money, no loans. When my bimmer- driving friend Houng complained about the cost of a UC, I didn’t say anything. I knew her family was sending me money through DC and Sacramento. Tri had never wanted to come to the U. S. It was his father’s idea. His dad, my mother’s brother, owned 35 McDonald’s franchises in Vietnam, and he wanted Tri to improve his English. Dad didn’t think memorized Drake lyrics would allow his son to communicate with American McDonald’s executives. I don’t know why. Tri, on the other hand, saw no reason to take ESL classes at Coastline. Or anywhere. He didn’t really want to command thousands of burger chefs. He dreamed of producing music. He’d asked his dad to fund a recording studio in Ho Chi Minh City, but his father answered by sending Tri to Coastline to study English and live with us, my mother and father and grandmother, in a tiny three- bedroom in Westminster. Tri’s dad was paying, so he got his own room while I was forced to move in with Grandma. Tri had gone to every class of the spring semester but only because of Hien. The poor girl was in class with Tri about 12 hours a week, Reading/ Writing/ Grammar in the morning and Listening and Conversation in the afternoon. A beautiful trapped bird in a cage. Week 9, Spring Semester, 2020 I couldn’t believe my cousin. We were sitting at our green Formica kitchen table with the spindly metal legs angling out that we’d found at a yard sale in Huntington Beach for $15. The plastic on the chairs looked like someone had taken a knife to it. Tri was eating a bowl of rice for breakfast. Or was it lunch? He had just gotten up. It was 1 pm. I was having noodles with passion fruit on the side. Dad had planted a tree in our postage- stamp backyard for Grandma, who said it reminded her of home, the countryside of South Vietnam. She always said “South Vietnam,” even though there was only Vietnam now, no “North” or “South.” “Trang, I’m fallin’ apart. I headed back Ho Chi Minh City when virus come.” “Too bad, Tri.” I lied. "I thought for sure I can kick out Coastline and come home.”

"HIEN WANTED TO BE A PHARMACIST. EXCHANGING FLIRTY TEXTS WITH TRI WASN’T ON THE COASTLINE COUNSELOR’S EDUCATIONAL PLAN FOR HER."

church is on YouTube. The same for Mom and Dad and Grandma’s church, St. Teresa’s.” “But I hear Grandma say she going confession in shed on Saturday.” “She’s talking about this priest one of her friends told her about in Garden Grove. He bought a 10 x 10 metal shed at Home Depot and is doing drive-by confessions. Six feet away. Confessors in cars. Grandma’s going.” “By herself?” “Why not?” “First, because her driving. Second, because a virus. Third, she old.” “Grandma raised five children by herself while Grandpa was in re-education camp for five years after the war. She fought off a dozen men who wanted to marry her. Do you think a governor’s ‘suggestions’”—I inserted air quotes—“are going to stop her from doing what she wants to do?” “Maybe no.” It was time to change the topic. “Here’s an idea, Tri. While you’re stuck here, why don’t you make the best of what you call your ‘bad situation’? Study hard and improve your English. Before you know it, summer will be here. There are no ESL classes in the summer at Coastline, so you can go home. You’ll get better soon.” “You funny, Trang. My English good. It better than you. You stolen English.” “Really.” “Lookin’ for the right way to do the wrong things.” “You can stop lookin’,Tri.” “So why am I in class if this is who I’m trying to be like? So I drop out, lessons I was taught are quick to fade As I realized that turning papers in won’t get me paid.” “Nice English, Tri. Too bad it’s not yours.” “Better than your Sailor Twit.” Three months of insults. I crawled back to our cluttered burrow, trying to focus on my Micro test and block out the near certainty of an online fall semester. At least I would have my old room back by then, my future Zoom room. Bomb.

THREE PANDEMIC HAIKUS BY LISA DUPUY

WORK REMOTE FROM HOME ZOOMING IS HOWWE CONNECT BRADY BUNCH GRID-STYLE

GRAY HAIRS PEEKING OUT SHELTER IN PLACE, NO MOVEMENT SHOWING MY TRUE AGE

NEIGHBORS WEARING MASKS MUFFLED GOOD MORNINGS TO ME AS THEY CROSS THE STREET

TAKEOUT MENU

I L E A R N E D MY C U L T U R E F R OM T H E B A C K O F A T A K E O U T M E N U T R Y I N G T O CO N N E C T T H E D O T S B E TW E E N T H E S L A N T E D P A R E N T H E S E S T H A T T U R N E D H I N D I T O E N G L I S H I L E A R N E D T H E S T A T E S A N D C I T I E S I N I N D I A F R OM T H E C U R R I E S T H E Y P R O D U C E D A N D H R A , H Y D E R A B A D , MA D R A S M I L D , M E D I UM , S P I C Y T H E S AM E WA Y A F O R E I G N E R WO U L D

I L E A R N E D I N E L E M E N T A R Y S C H OO L T O T H R OW MY MOM ’ S COO K I N G I N T H E T R A S H T H A T S OM E T I M E S T H E R UMB L E O F A N E MP T Y S T OMA C H WA S L E S S P A I N F U L T H A N T H E S E A R I N G S N A R L O F S OM E O N E E L S E ’ S D I S G U S T I L E A R N E D T O P U S H I T A L L AWA Y T O G U A R D MY S E L F I N T H E A RMO R O F T H E O R D I N A R Y T O S T A Y AWA Y F R OM T H E S P I C E S A N D S C E N T S O F A L A N D I N E V E R K N E W T H A T S T I L L L I V E D W I T H I N MY S K I N I L E A R N E D MY C U L T U R E F R OM T H E B A C K O F A T A K E O U T M E N U T H A N K I N G T H O S E L I K E M E WH O W E R E B R A V E E N O U G H T O P U T T H E S E WO R D S I N P R I N T T H E WA Y I N E V E R CO U L D .

A L Y S S A

N A M B I A R

M Y F A T H E R O N

T H E F E A T H E R

Creative Nonfiction

B Y T I M D A V I E S

My father looks up at me from the bank of the Feather River with a smile that would reappear in rare , sacred moments from the mirror in later years . It is the kind of smile that finds its home on the porch of the eyes , genuine and easy . Those piercing blue eyes and the long eyelashes that were passed down regard me with a wisp of triumph . Behind him , the water boils and churns , its mossy perfume filling my nose . The smile seems at odds with the flashing knife held tightly in his right hand ; looking down offers an explanation . There on dull gray , smooth rocks , lay two bright King Salmon . We had arrived at daylight , crawling from a deep sleep at 3 AM to make the morning rise . Dad had spent the prior evening tying flies , intricate bumblebees and the like , flies of his unique invention – something he promised he would teach me . Now , the fish lay in glistening repose on the river ’ s

bank in testament to the power of the fly and the skill of my father .

not unlike fly fishing , and the line is allowed to sink and bump along the bottom , driven by current and hope . Then we wait for a change . It is not a bite really and must be felt to be understood . Most times I am wrong , and it is just the bottom , pretending to be a fish . But when the rod bends and the string sings as it climbs the river , so does my heart . I

learned patience here and it has served me well . We must be careful not to cross each other , so the rhythm of cast … drift … wait … cast … takes us to a place without words . As the sun rises , even though the only thing biting is gnats , I would rather be nowhere else in the world . The call of hawks and the occasional rise of

His green neoprene waders cover him from chest to feet . I am wrapped in brown . In order to catch the prize , we must do the dance , according to my dad . This means wading into the stream across the moss - covered stones in swift , icy water recently melted from the snows of the Sierra Nevada range . Claiming a likely spot , we make gentle , rolling casts ,

I F I C L O S E M Y E Y E S , H E A R I N G T H E R U S H O F W A T E R I N M Y M E M O R Y , I S T I L L S E E T H A T S M I L E .

mammoth fish fill the day with promise . We mesh . It is a father - son dance . Cast upon cast we waltz in eddies and riffles . It has a melody of its own , one with which we are both familiar . The bites will come if we are patient . Soon , the beat of the river bottom is committed to touch , and I anticipate its contours . Tap , bump bump , tap tap , and then a beat is missed …. I strike ! Leaning back into the rod and watching it bend as the line sings like a plucked string on a harp . The fish runs and my reel hisses in protest . I bring him a little closer , simultaneously fighting the current and the powerful silver king . We battle until my wrists ache and my forearms are on fire . At last , he surrenders , his heart burst from the effort , a valiant fight , a worthy opponent . So , the day goes . Dad fights , then I do . Now the pair wait at his feet to be cleaned and hauled back to the truck . Had I known that there was another battle raging , I would have done more . I wish I had felt the pause , his change in rhythm . But I didn ’ t and I couldn ’ t . My wife never told me about the pain in his arm as he drove her to camp , causing him to stop at the side of the road . I imagine , that merely a week later he fought valiantly like that bright salmon on the Feather , struggling against an invisible force that dragged him from this world and onto the banks of heaven . If I close my eyes , hearing the rush of water in my memory , I still see that smile .

SIDNEY HO, "AC R YLIC PAINTING #1"

JOANNA TANG, "AT WHAT COST?" P. 47

LISA DUPUY, "TH R EE HAIKUS" P. 42

Joanna Tang lives in sunny Huntington Beach with her parents, older sister, younger brother, and grandmother. Homeschooled her entire life, she passed the California High School Proficiency Exam at fourteen. She juggled her high school years with many extracurricular activities, including memory competitions and music performance. Currently, Joanna is pursuing a degree in computer science with her sister. Outside of school, some favorite activities that she fills her schedule with are teaching children (especially during the summer months) and playing piano and flute for church and senior homes. In her free time, Joanna finds pleasure in tending her family's vegetable garden, brewing kombucha, cooking, serving as her brother's Lego assistant, and discussing life with her family at mealtimes.

A NATIVE OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA , LISA DUPUY IS CURRENTLY LIVING IN HUNTINGTON BEACH AND ENJOYS ALL THE BEACH HAS TO OFFER . SHE ATTENDED SANTA ANA COLLEGE AND EARNED HER ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE IN BUSINESS AND WENT ON TO ATTEND CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY , FULLERTON , RECEIVING HER BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION . SHE STARTED WORKING FOR COAST COLLEGES AT THE DISTRICT OFFICE IN 2000 IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND IS A HUMAN RESOURCES , SPECIALIST . IN HER SPARE TIME , SHE ENJOYS RIDING HER BEACH CRUISER , VISITING MUSEUMS , AND IS A CARETAKER ( SERVANT ) TO TWO REGAL , HIGH MAINTENANCE HIMALAYAN CATS .

T IM DAVIES , "MY FATHER ON THE FEATHER" p . 44

Having lived most of his life in Southern California, Tim has worked in the medical field for more than 30 years as a Respiratory Therapist, primarily in the intensive care setting. He has pursued careers in art as a sculptor and painter, as well as writing in the early 1990’s. Currently, his passion is photography. He is also a pastor and a father of five children and nine grandchildren and can often be found these days with a camera in his hand, chasing the perfect moment.

BY JOANNA TANG

CRUX ESSAY CONTEST WINNER 2019 - 2020

It ’ s just a dirty russet potato ,

one of several in an ordinary , five - pound bag . But that bag of potatoes took almost 240

gallons of water to produce ( Kim et al .). Grown on roughly 14 . 5 square feet of demolished

natural habitats , the plants that produced these potatoes were continuously sprayed with

fertilizers and pesticides , pollutants which contaminate our waterways and wetlands via

agricultural runoff . These potatoes were then harvested with industrial - scale machinery

and transported over thousands of miles in refrigerated trucks , filling the atmosphere with

fuel emissions . This is the impact for producing a single bag of potatoes . But the story

doesn ’ t end there . That ’ s right ; this bag of potatoes sits on top of a giant pile of identical

bags with the same production history . Furthermore , this potato pile is surrounded by a

brilliant rainbow of hundreds of different veggies and fruits , all resting in the chilly produce

section of a typical grocery store . The strawberry clamshells , the tomato clusters , the beet

bunches — each sadly shares a similar story to the bag of potatoes . And this grocery store is

only one of the 40 , 000 grocery stores in the U . S . alone , not to mention all the other

countries in the world . Our planet is paying a high price for our irresponsible farming

practices . How can we continue to feed the world while preventing the negative

environmental impacts from conventional farming ? With the constant demand to provide

for our increasing population , I propose indoor vertical farming as a sustainable alternative

to conventional farming in order to reduce energy , land , and water usage , as well as

detrimental waste byproducts .

Most of us don ’ t consider how much energy goes into crop production . Industrial - scale

farming relies heavily on equipment and machinery for mixing soil , planting , pumping

water , spraying agricultural chemicals , harvesting , and , in some cases , thorough drying .

According to the U . S . Energy Information Administration ( EIA ), the U . S . agricultural

industry in 2012 used “ nearly 800 trillion British thermal units of energy ”— the same amount

of primary energy required to power “ the entire state of Utah ” ( Hicks )! Even though this

number includes the energy both from crop and livestock operations , crop operations still

accounted for over 62 percent of energy used . This high energy usage is a problem and

even more so because of where farms are sourcing their energy from . The USDA ’ s

economic research service reported that U . S . farms dominantly source their direct

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