Holland & Usry February 2020

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* This newsletter is intended to educate the public about personal injury, workers’ compensation, criminal defense, and family law issues. You can copy and distribute it as long as you copy the entire newsletter. But the newsletter is not intended to be legal advice; you should ask a lawyer about your specific case. Every case is different, and all case outcomes depend on unique facts and laws.

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INSIDE this issue

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How to Say Sorry Sincerely Your Kids Deserve Valentine’s Day Treatment Too! Testimonials Don’t Diminish Your Workers’ Comp Claim Easy Shrimp Scampi Famous Tongue Twisters and Their Origins

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PETER PIPER DID WHAT? THE LITTLE-KNOWN ORIGINS OF COMMON TONGUE TWISTERS

Tongue twisters are a highlight of many people’s childhoods and are also highly entertaining for many adults. Having the ability to say “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers” without stumbling or stuttering can earn you several impressed stares. However, as fun as they are to say, not very many people know the history behind our favorite tongue twisters.

PETER PIPER: Pierre Poivre, Gardener

finds to people, including the fossils of the ichthyosaur, the plesiosaur, and the pterosaur. Though her constant scouring of the shores inspired Terry Sullivan’s “She Sells Sea Shells” song, Mary’s more prominent fossil discoveries went mostly unrecognized.

Although it is not known for sure, Peter Piper and his pickled peppers are speculated to be inspired by a French horticulturist, Pierre Poivre. Throughout the 18th century, it’s said that Pierre would smuggle cloves out of the Dutch East India Company-controlled Spice Islands. He then grew them on his own, which then led to freeing the market for future cloves.

HOW MUCH WOOD: Fay Templeton, Performer

SHE SELLS SEASHELLS: Mary Anning, Fossil Discoverer

Of the many tongue twisters in the world, “How Much Wood Could a Woodchuck Chuck” is a real favorite. This rhyme was introduced to the public through the musical “The Runaways” in a song performed by Fay Templeton in 1903. Most people pay little attention to the origin of the tongue twister and instead spend more time trying to answer it. In the 20th century, a New York fish and wildlife technician named Richard Thomas put some thought into it and declared the answer is 700 pounds.

The popular beach-themed tongue twister, “She sells seashells by the seashore,” was inspired by groundbreaking discoverer Mary Anning. Mary was a woman living in the 19th century who collected rocks, seashells, and even fossils on the rocky shores near her home. To support her family, Mary sold her

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