Report to the Nation 2016

Ten years after Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) charted a course for a future of No More Victims® through the Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving ®, fatalities caused by the leading killer on our nation’s roadways have been reduced by 24 percent. Yet, we still have much work to do to stop the completely preventable crime of drunk driving. MADD continues to change America’s attitude toward drunk driving by serving thousands of victims and helping them turn their grief into advocacy. MADD victims and volunteers are working across the country to pass more effective laws and push for technologies that will one day eliminate drunk driving. CAMPAIGN TO ELIMINATE DRUNK DRIVING 10 TH ANNIVERSARY

DEDICATION

Matthew Klotzbach Killed by a drunk driver 5/30/79-7/29/01

2006 Drunk driving caused 13,000 fatalities more than causing 2016 have dropped 24% Drunk driving fatalities to 32% of all fatal crashes 10,000 more than

The Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving launched in 2006 when reductions in drunk driving deaths had stalled. MADD reviewed the research, data, and best practices across the country and examined proven traffic safety plans from the past to create an effective and innovative blueprint to finally put an end to drunk driving. Drunk driving still claims the lives of more than 10,000 victims and changes the lives of 290,000 survivors every year. Laws in some states desperately need improvement. Law enforcement officers work tirelessly and need our support. Technological advancements can’t come soon enough. By focusing on countermeasures in place today, laws we can pass tomorrow, and future technologies that will make cars safer in the future, we will reach our ultimate goal — No More Victims®.

Matthew Klotzbach wanted to serve his country as a U.S. Navy pilot. As a midshipman at the U.S. Naval Academy preparing for his junior year, Matthew came home to Livermore, Calif., to visit his family for his summer break. After a family outing to the beach, Matthew and his parents, Mary and Tom Klotzbach, were returning home when a drunk driver whose license was suspended crashed into the Klotzbach family’s vehicle, killing Matthew. Since that tragic day, Mary and Tom have drawn upon their grief to make a difference in California and across the country. This year, after 15 years of advocating for change in California, a new drunk driving law was passed that will save lives. As Mary likes to say, “Matthew took an oath to serve his country, he is serving in a way none of us anticipated.”

This report is dedicated to Matthew, Mary and Tom, the Klotzbach Family, and all the victims of the 100 percent preventable crime of drunk driving.

per year

29% of all causing

fatal crashes

2

3

CAMPAIGN INITIATIVES

CAMPAIGN INITIATIVES

Advanced technology to eliminate drunk driving

High-visibility law enforcement

Law enforcement officers form the front lines in the battle to eliminate drunk driving, and they need every tool available to keep drunk drivers from devastating the lives of others. High-visibility campaigns, such as sobriety checkpoints and saturation patrols, are proven countermeasures that can be conducted anytime to deter drunk drivers and catch those who choose to drive impaired. The goal is to activate law enforcement to conduct DUI checkpoints while publicizing warnings to would-be drunk drivers with a message that if you Ignition interlocks are installed on drunk driving offenders’ vehicles to test their sobriety every time they attempt to start their car. The research is clear — 50-75 percent of convicted drunk drivers continue to drive with a suspended license, and installing interlocks on their vehicles is the best way to prevent them from reoffending. Studies show interlocks reduce DUI recidivism by 67 percent, and laws requiring interlocks for all offenders would reduce DUI deaths by 15 percent nationwide. Interlock laws have helped reduce drunk driving fatalities in states like West Virginia, Kansas, Louisiana and Arizona by 30 to 50 percent, which is unprecedented in traffic safety. Ignition interlocks for all drunk drivers

The Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) is the future of eliminating drunk driving once and for all. The goal of DADSS is to create a passive system to make vehicles inoperable if someone is at or above the illegal limit of .08 percent blood alcohol concentration or above. The system will be unnoticeable to sober drivers. The technology development began in 2008 as a cooperative agreement between the world’s leading automakers and the federal government. Two technologies, one touch-based and the other breath-based, are currently being explored.

Advanced vehicle technology known as DADSS is being developed to passively detect alcohol through a touch-based or breath based system.

MADD CEO Debbie Weir joins police officers for a sobriety checkpoint in Virginia Beach.

drive drunk, you will get caught. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration launches “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaigns during two of the most deadly times of the year on our nation’s roadways — in mid-August, leading up to Labor Day weekend, and in mid- December through New Year’s Day.

MADD is proud to be a leading champion of this effort. Our collective goal is to make DADSS available for all new vehicles and energize the public to want it in their vehicles as soon as possible. Grassroots support

Everyone has an opportunity and responsibility to help eliminate drunk driving. It’s now easier than ever to make the right choice to not drink and drive. In addition to traditional taxi cabs and transit options, rideshare companies like Uber make it fast and easy to find a safe way home. In 1986, MADD introduced the role of the “designated driver” as a personal choice and critical alternative to driving drunk. Today, celebrating 30 years of the designated driver and MADD’s red ribbon campaign, Tie One On...

MADD National President Colleen Sheehey-Church stands with and supports law enforcement, MADD’s heroes, nationwide.

for Safety ®, we continue to urge drivers to plan ahead and designate a non-drinking driver if their plans include alcohol. With all of the options and apps available today, there is no excuse to drive drunk and risk lives on the roadways. The success of the Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving would not be possible without you. MADD has truly embraced our tireless grassroots victims and volunteers to pass lifesaving interlock laws in 28 states and Washington D.C., support our law enforcement heroes, and create new and effective programs to stop drunk driving across the nation. Together, we will create a future of No More Victims®.

Rich Leotta, whose son Officer Noah Leotta was killed by a drunk driver, fought hard to help Maryland pass one of the nation’s strongest ignition interlock laws.

When the Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving began, only one state, New Mexico, required interlocks for all convicted offenders. Today, 28 states and the District of Columbia require interlocks for all drunk drivers. Every state has some type of ignition interlock law, including 29 states that require the devices for refusing an alcohol test.

4

5

RATING THE STATES

Ignition Interlocks Technology exists today that prevents a vehicle from starting if the driver’s blood alcohol concentration exceeds a preset limit. These devices should be required for all drunk driving offenders and should be removed only after showing compliance with a period of “clean” starts. • 28 states and the District of Columbia require ignition interlocks after the first offense • 25 states and the District of Columbia have compliance-based removal as part of their interlock laws, meaning clean tests are required for a set amount of time before the device can be removed. Sobriety Checkpoints Sobriety checkpoints and high-visibility law enforcement campaigns, such as “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over,” publicize that law enforcement is looking for drunk drivers. • 38 states and the District of Columbia conduct sobriety checkpoints • Checkpoints reduce alcohol-related fatality and injury crashes by 20 percent • A successful checkpoint is one that has deterred drunk driving, in addition to catching drunk drivers Administrative License Revocation (ALR) This critical law enforcement tool removes the immediate threat of a drunk driver harming innocent bystanders. • 41 states and the District of Columbia immediately revoke driving privileges • ALR allows for other administrative action, such as restricted driving privileges or an ignition interlock requirement, to protect the public while offender awaits trial • License suspension alone is not the best long-term solution because 50 to 75 percent of offenders continue to drive after losing their driving privileges, which is why MADD supports interlocks during ALR Child Endangerment Driving drunk with a child passenger is a form of child abuse that should be met with additional penalties. • In 2015, 134 children under age 15 were killed by a drunk driver who was at least 21 years old • 47 states and the District of Columbia have additional penalties for driving drunk with a child passenger • MADD recognizes New York’s Leandra’s Law as the nation’s model child endangerment law Refusals In June 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed states’ rights to penalize suspected drunk drivers who refuse an alcohol breath test but said warrants must be obtained for blood and urine tests. • 20 percent of suspected drunk drivers refuse a sobriety test • Expedited warrants are needed for law enforcement to collect evidence to help prosecute drunk drivers • 33 states require an ignition interlock or criminalize refusals , eliminating the incentive for a suspected drunk driver to refuse a test

ND

MN

Mothers Against Drunk Driving monitors progress using a five-star system to rate the states and encourage the adoption of proven countermeasures. This year, MADD added a new half-star feature to provide a more detailed analysis of effective state laws. It is important to note that stars are not weighted equally. While all countermeasures are important to improve a state’s drunk driving laws, we know that ignitioninterlocks and sobriety checkpoints are the two most effective ways to dramatically reduce fatalities and injuries. Individual state information is available on the following pages.

.16BAC

WI

MA

SD

MI

.17BAC

IA

PA

NJ

.10BAC

.10BAC

OH

IN

DC

KY

NC

OK

SC

GA

WA

MT

MN

OR

.16BAC

WI

ID

MI

WY

.17BAC

IA

.10BAC

DC

TX

0.5

1

1.5

2

2.5

3

0.5

4

4.5

5

AK

MT

SD

MI

.17BAC

WA

PA

NJ

.10BAC

DC

KY

ME

TN

MT

ND

LA

VT

OR

MN

NH

WI

ID

NY

MA CT

SD

MI

WY

RI

IA

PA

NJ

NE

NV

OH

VT

IN

DC

DE

IL

SD

CA

UT

MD

DC

CO

VA WV

KS

NM

MO

KY

NC

TN

OK

AZ

AR

SC

NM

HI

MS AL GA

LA

TX

ME

MT

OR

NH

ID

NY

MA

SD

MI

FL

OH

IN

VA

MO

KY

NM

GA

MS AL

TX

FL

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RATING THE STATES

Administrative License Revocation

Administrative License Revocation

Child Endangerment

All-offender interlock law

Sobriety Checkpoints*

No Refusal

Child Endangerment

All-offender interlock law

Sobriety Checkpoints*

No Refusal

Interlock available upon arrest for first-time offenders

Interlock Device and/or Criminalized Refusals

Interlock available upon arrest for first-time offenders

Interlock Device and/or Criminalized Refusals

Total Stars

Done at least monthly

Total Stars

Done at least monthly

Law Present

Conducts Checkpoints

Law Present

Compliance based removal

Expedited Warrants

Law Present

Conducts Checkpoints

Law Present

Compliance based removal

Expedited Warrants

Misdemeanor

Felony

Misdemeanor

Felony

0.5

Montana Nebraska

3.5

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado

4 3 3 2

3

Nevada

4.5 3.5 3.5

New Hampshire

New Jersey New Mexico

2.5

4

4 3

New York

3.5

Connecticut

North Carolina North Dakota

4 3

Delaware

2.5 2.5 3.5 2.5 1.5 2.5 1.5 3.5 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 4.5 2 3

D.C.

Ohio

2.5

Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana

Oklahoma

3

Oregon

3.5 1.5

Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota

4 3

1.5 3.5

Iowa

Tennessee

Kansas

Texas Utah

2

Kentucky Louisiana

2.5

Vermont

3

Maine

Virgina

4.5

Maryland

Washington West Virgina

2

Massachusetts

1

Michigan Minnesota Mississippi

2

Wisconsin Wyoming

2

1.5

4.5

2.91

National Rating

4

Missouri

8

9

*Governors Highway Safety Association data

TIMELINE

2007

2006

2008

Oregon, Louisiana, Arizona and Illinois enact all offender ignition interlock laws

Washington, Colorado, Alaska, Nebraska and West Virginia enact all-offender laws. Plans announced for cooperative agreement on advanced auto technology. Florida enacts a law requiring interlocks for first-time offenders with a BAC of .15 or greater. Federal government and automakers each pledge $1 million per year for 5 years.

MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving is announced as blueprint to eliminate drunk driving in America; one state (New Mexico) has all-offender ignition interlock law

2009

2011

2010

All-offender laws pass in Arkansas, Utah, New York and a four-county pilot in California. Wisconsin and Wyoming enacts a law requiring interlocks for first-time offenders with a BAC of .15 or greater. New York passes Leandra’s law, the nation’s most comprehensive child endangerment law.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and NHTSA Administrator David Strickland visit DADSS lab in Massachusetts. Kansas and Connecticut pass all-offender laws. Oklahoma enacts a law requiring interlocks for first-time offenders with a BAC of .15 or greater.

MADD celebrates its 30th anniversary. Hawaii passes an all-offender law. No Refusal weekends highlighted as part of national DUI initiative. New Jersey passes Ricci’s law, requiring ignition interlocks for offenders with a .15 BAC and above.

2012

2013

2014

MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving becomes federal law when Congress passes MAP-21. DADSS is authorized, an incentive grant program begins for all offender ignition interlock programs, and federal DUI crackdowns are funded. Missouri and Virginia pass all-offender ignition interlock laws.

NHTSA names DADSS as one of three key initiatives toward ending traffic deaths as part of its Seamless and Significant initiative. Tennessee and Maine enact all-offender laws.

Mississippi, Alabama, New Hampshire and Delaware enact all-offender laws. Emma’s law passes in South Carolina, requiring ignition interlocks for first- time offenders with a .15 BAC or higher.

2015

2016

Texas passes all-offender ignition interlock law. Kentucky enacts a law requiring interlocks for first-time offenders with a BAC of .15 or greater. FAST Act is passed reauthorizing key federal programs, including incentive funding for states with all-offender ignition interlock laws.

Washington, D.C., Vermont, Maryland and Rhode Island pass all-offender ignition interlock laws. Pennsylvania passes a law requiring ignition interlocks for first-time offenders with a .10 BAC and above. California passes a law adding incentives to first-time offenders to choose an interlock and mandating for repeat offenders. With Georgia enacting a first-time offender interlock law, too, only Massachusetts and Idaho are remaining states that fail to use interlocks for first-time offenders. A new oversight structure is announced for DADSS. Virginia commits to over $5 million in funding for DADSS, bringing the total to over $11 million per year.

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THE MISSION OF MOTHERS AGAINST DRUNK DRIVING IS TO END DRUNK DRIVING, HELP FIGHT DRUGGED DRIVING, SUPPORT THE VICTIMS OF THIS VIOLENT

CRIME AND PREVENT UNDERAGE DRINKING.

MADD National Office 511 E. John Carpenter Freeway Suite 700 Irving TX 75062 877.ASK.MADD 877.MADD.HELP 24-Hour Victim Help Line madd.org

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