Webster University Conservatory of Theatre Arts

UNIVERSITY

WEBSTER UNIVERSITY

470 EAST LOCKWOOD, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 63119

presents

A PROFESSIONAL THEATRE TRAINING PROGRAM IN EIGHT SEMESTERS

featuring

BFA DEGREE

with majors in

ACTING, MUSICAL THEATRE, SCENE DESIGN, COSTUME DESIGN, LIGHTING DESIGN, SOUND DESIGN, WIG AND MAKEUP DESIGN, SCENE PAINTING, COSTUME CONSTRUCTION, TECHNICAL DIRECTION, STAGE MANAGEMENT

and

BA DEGREE

with majors in

DIRECTING, AND THEATRE STUDIES & DRAMATURGY

in partnership with

THE DEPARTMENTS OF DANCE AND MUSIC

and

REPERTORY THEATRE ST. LOUIS OPERA THEATRE OF SAINT LOUIS THE MUNY: THE MUNICIPAL OPERA ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS ST. LOUIS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL VARIETY THEATRE COMPANY OF ST. LOUIS ARROW ROCK LYCEUM THEATRE

Twelfth Night

On the cover: Picnic

From the Dean of the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts

From the Chair of the Conservatory of Theatre Arts

experiences that will help you define your voice and learn the skills you will need to succeed. Webster is an exciting and unique place to hone your craft. Our partnerships with six remarkable and nationally recognized professional performing institutions— Repertory Theatre St. Louis, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, St. Louis Shakespeare Festival, Variety Theatre Company of St. Louis, Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre, and The Muny— provide our students with incredible and unique opportunities unequaled at any other undergraduate institution. To view the best and be a part of exceptional, professional theatre is a rare opportunity. We encourage you to apply! Explore Webster, and the Conservatory. We are confident you will find the challenges and training to be exceptional. We look forward to meeting you this year. We are proud of the faculty and know that demanding work and exciting performances are natural results of the talent at the heart of the Conservatory. At the Conservatory of Theatre Arts at Webster University, we lead through doing and excel by challenging. Come join us.

in our embodying imagined circumstances, we build the equitable, antiracist, inclusive, sustainable world that we want for ourselves. What we do in our studios, in our rehearsal rooms, and on our stages (or Zoom screens) serves as rehearsal for what we do in our homes, and in our streets, and even in our hearts. For over fifty years, the Conservatory of Theatre Arts at Webster University has been guided by the core belief that there is power in a strong ensemble. No matter what role we play—whether it is in the rehearsal hall, in class, onstage, backstage, in the booth, or in the shops—each of us performs as part of a larger team effort. This core principle permeates our work, from day one until you graduate and become our colleague. Perhaps at no other time has the power of ensemble proven more important than this year. We remain committed to caring for each other and helping each of us thrive. We hope you consider joining our ensemble.

Paul Steger

Gad Guterman

For over 50 years, the Conservatory of Theatre Arts has been recognized as a national leader for training artists for careers in the theatre and film industry. The Conservatory remains an exceptional place to train and an exciting place to participate in creating remarkable theatre experiences. Like you, we are passionate, selective, rigorous and demanding. We believe that in order to achieve excellence, one must be ready, willing, able, and eager to accept the rigors of a disciplined, and demanding life. We are committed to help you prepare for your career. We celebrate the fact that theatre requires an incredible blend of a highly diversified series of accumulated skills whether you are an actor, designer, technician, director, dramaturg, or stage manager. To blend those skills and become proficient professionally, you must be

These are challenging times. Many, if not most, of our professional colleagues are awaiting to return to work. Still, one fact keeps me feeling not only optimistic but also grateful. My own theatre education has prepared me well for this incredibly difficult moment. Making theatre requires collaboration, imagination, problem-solving, time management, resource management, improvisation, and tending to interpersonal relationships. We simply cannot make theatre if we don’t play with what we’ve been given and play in a safe, caring, compassionate manner. Not only are we figuring out how to learn and to make art under strict protocols, we are figuring out how to be better once the pandemic is in the past. “Crisis is always an opportunity for change.” That’s playwright Paula Vogel on why this moment, terrifying as it may be, is also thrilling. In our playing and

Gad Guterman Chair, Conservatory of Theatre Arts Webster University

Paul Steger Dean, Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts Webster University

willing to commit to a challenging and stimulating sequence of courses and

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Only the Finest

Cast of Characters

Bomb-itty of Errors

Picnic

Each spring the Conservatory holds auditions and interviews in several major cities throughout the United States as well as on the Webster University home campus. All students in Conservatory, regardless of their area of interest, are screened through interviews, auditions, or portfolio showings. Students accepted into Conservatory have demonstrated artistic ability and the desire to achieve the highest professional standards. From the many students who audition each year, we expect that no more than 30 will enter performance programs, five will enter the stage management program, and 25 will enter production programs. During the four years at Webster, each student’s progress is carefully mentored through ongoing evaluation processes. At the end of each semester, performance students present at semester showings and engage in

one-on-one interviews with faculty. Production students present at a portfolio review, which includes all faculty. A critical element of Conservatory philosophy is that each member understands the entire theatrical process: actors build sets, construct costumes, hang lights, or run props. Designers, technicians, and stage managers study acting, and all learn the fundamentals of directing. Our highly selective screening process, our rigorous curriculum, and our strong relationships with professional theatre companies on campus lead to our graduates being among the finest young professionals entering the job market.

Paul Steger....................................................................... Dean, Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts Dr. Gad Guterman.................................................................... Chair, Conservatory of Theatre Arts Carole Tucker........................................................... Associate Chair, Conservatory of Theatre Arts Performance Programs Jef Awada............................................................... Co-Head of Performance Programs, Movement Joanna Battles............................................... Co-Head of Performance Programs, Voice and Speech Michael Baxter........................................................................................................ Musical Theatre Lisa Campbell Albert......................... Musical Accompaniment, Musical Direction, Vocal Coaching Rayme Cornell........................................................................................................................ Acting Christopher Dietrich............................................................................................... Senior Showcase Doug Finlayson. ............................................................................ Directing, Acting for the Camera Gary Glasgow............................................................................................................ Acting, Pilates Gad Guterman............................................................................. Text Analysis, Creative Dramatics Nancy Lewis............................................................................................................................. Yoga Bruce Longworth....................................................................................... Acting, Voice and Speech Bill Lynch. ............................................... Acting, Voice and Speech, Text Analysis, Musical Theatre Ron McGowan.................................. Musical Accompaniment, Vocal Coaching, Musical Direction Amelia Acosta Powell........................................................................................................ Auditions Larry Pry........................................... Musical Accompaniment, Vocal Coaching, Musical Direction

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Michael James Reed. ......................................... Musical Theatre, Auditions, Acting for the Camera Andy Sloey. ................................................................................................................ Improvisation Paul Steger........................................................................................................................... Combat Lara Teeter. ........................ Head of Program, Musical Theatre, Musical Theatre Dance Styles, Tap

Guest Artists for 2020–2021 Rob Denton...................................................................................................... Lighting Technology Ron Himes. ................................................................................................. Canfield Drive, director Jamie McKittrick............................................................................................................... Directing Caesar Samayoa. ..................................................................................................... Deadly, director Nicolas Valdez............................................................................................ Deadly, musical director Jennifer Wintzer. ............................................................................................... The Living, director Repertory Theatre St. Louis Hana Sharif............................................................................................................ Artistic Director Amelia Acosta Powell.............................................................................. Associate Artistic Director Mark Bernstein................................................................................................... Managing Director Lawrence Bennett......................................................................................... Director of Production Opera Theatre of Saint Louis Andrew Jorgensen. ................................................................................................ General Director James Robinson...................................................................................................... Artistic Director Paul Kilmer................................................................................. Director of Artistic Administration Steve Ryan.................................................................................................... Director of Production The Muny: The Municipal Opera Association of St. Louis Mike Isaacson.................................................................................................... Executive Producer Denny Reagan...................................................................................................... President & CEO Tracy Utzmeyers............................................................................................... Production Manager St. Louis Shakespeare Festival Tom Ridgley.......................................................................................... Producing Artistic Director Bruce Longworth....................................................................................................... Resident Artist Adam Flores.......................................................... Community Engagement & Education Manager Variety Theatre Company of St. Louis Jan Albus..................................................................................................... Chief Executive Officer Joy Addler................................................................................................ Performing Arts Manager Lara Teeter. ......................................................................................................................... Director Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre Quin Gresham........................................................................................................ Artistic Director Steve Bertani....................................................................................................... Managing Director Department of Dance Maggi Dueker.......................................................................................................................... Chair Beckah Reed........................................................................................................... Artistic Director

Directing Program Doug Finlayson. ................................................................................... Head of Program, Directing

Design and Technical Production Program John Wylie........................... Head of Production Programs, Technical Production, Lighting Design Tina Beck.......................................................................................................... Lighting Technology Lawrence Bennett...................................................................................... Production Management Lee Buckalew....................................................................................................... Sound Technology Dunsi Dai.................................................................................................................... Scene Design Sabrina Doris................................................................................................. Costume Construction Garth Dunbar......................................................................................................... Costume Design Dottie Marshall Englis............................................................................................ Costume Design Doug Finlayson. .................................................................................................. Visual Storytelling Rich Fisher. ...................................................................................................................... AutoCAD Hans Fredrickson. ........................................................................................... Technical Production Emily Frei........................................................................................................................ Upholstery Becky Hanson............................................................................ Crafts, Costume Shop Management Kelly Kreutsberg................................................................................................... Properties Design Scott Loebl. ............................................................................................................... Scene Painting Arthur Lueking.................................................................................................. Technical Direction John Metzner............................................................................................. Wig and Makeup Design Tim Moore...................................................................................................... Technical Production John Ryan. .................................................................................................... Scene Shop Supervisor Steve Ryan...................................................... Technical Direction, Projections, Crew Management Chris Shetley........................................................................................................................ Electrics Michele Siler.................................................................................. Visual History: Costume History Carole Tucker.................................................. Costume Construction, Costume Shop Management Rusty Wandall............................................................................................................ Sound Design Evangeline Rose Whitlock................................................................................... Stage Management Sean Wilhite. ....................................................................................................... Sound Technology Ralph Wilke. ................................................................................................ Furniture Construction James Wolk.............................................................. Drafting, Visual History: Architectural History Stage Management Program Evangeline Rose Whitlock..................................................... Head of Program, Stage Management Edward Coffield. ................................................................... Artistic Director, New Jewish Theatre Theatre Studies & Dramaturgy Program Dr. Gad Guterman................. Head of Program, Dramaturgy, Theatre History, Creative Dramatics Dr. Julie Jordan........................................................................................................ Theatre History Brian Slaten................................................................................................................. Studio Acting Dr. Sara Beth Taylor. ............................................................................................... Theatre History

Department of Music Dr. Jeffrey Carter..................................................................................................................... Chair

Department of Art Dr. Ryan Gregg........................................................................................................................ Chair

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Performance Programs: Acting

Performance Programs: Musical Theatre

Students in the acting program train for work in a wide array of venues. Voice, movement, and acting are core to the curriculum every semester. Classes cover many styles, including period and contemporary realism, Chekhov and Ibsen, Shakespeare, Restoration, and Edwardian. Work in class prepares actors for both stage and film work. Scene I: Discovery Units in acting, voice and speech, movement, stagecraft, text analysis, and makeup help you discover what it means to be an actor and to establish the basis for your personal technique. Methods include:

Scene III: Application Work in contrasting styles becomes even more ambitious. Skills you acquired in years one and two are applied to:

› Shakespeare › Restoration › Edwardian drama

Voice and movement classes develop even more specific skills in:

› Dialects › Period movement › Stage combat

› Centering and aligning › Vocal production and phonetics › Games and exercises › Improvisation › Scene study › Theatre history

Classes in directing and improv are added to the basic core of courses.

Scene IV: Refining for the Future New skill and investigation units are added to your core curriculum, including:

First-year students do not perform publicly but do present scene work for Conservatory at the end of the year. Scene II: Exploration You stretch and strengthen basic techniques from your first-year units using highly contrasting styles of dramatic literature. Added to the core of acting and voice and speech are:

› Interviewing › Audition › Cold reading

› Acting for the camera › Commedia dell’arte › Clown

The Conservatory musical theatre program continues to be unique in its emphasis on acting. Students train for work in a wide array of venues. Voice, movement, and acting are core to the curriculum every semester. Classes cover many styles, including period and contemporary realism, Shakespeare, Restoration, and Edwardian. Work in class prepares actors for both stage and film work. Students complete the four-year sequence of the Conservatory Acting Program in addition to the intensive musical theatre units in:

Scene I: Discovery Units in acting, voice and speech, movement, musical theatre, song study, voice lessons, vocal coaching, ballet and jazz dance, stagecraft, text analysis, and makeup help you discover what it means to be an actor and to establish the basis for your personal technique. Methods include:

And, in Spring semester, you present in Senior Showcase!

› Yoga › Neutral mask › Physical characterization › Song Study › Audition Techniques

› Centering and aligning › Vocal production and phonetics › Games and exercises › Improvisation

You join the casting pool and are now eligible to perform in the Conservatory season.

› Musical Theatre › Song study › Music theory

› Scene study › Song study

› Piano › Dance

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Directing Program

Required courses outside of Conservatory include:

Voice and movement classes develop even more specific skills in:

› Music theory musicianship › Private voice and piano › Dance (ballet or jazz)

› Dialects › Period movement › Stage combat

First-year students do not perform publicly but do present scene work for the Conservatory at the end of the year. Scene II: Exploration You stretch and strengthen basic techniques from your first-year units using highly contrasting styles of dramatic literature. Added to the core of acting and voice and speech are:

Third-year Musical Theatre Styles units are devoted to musical theatre scene, song, and dance study.

Required courses outside of Conservatory include:

› Vocal Ensemble › Advanced dance classes in ballet, jazz, tap and musical theatre styles › Continued private voice and piano Scene IV: Refining for the Future New skill and investigation units are added to your core curriculum, including:

› Yoga › Neutral mask › Physical characterization › Musical Theatre › Audition Technique

› Interviewing › Audition › Cold reading

In Musical Theatre Song Study, these skills are applied to various Broadway genres and to the completion of an audition book.

› Acting for the camera › Commedia dell’arte › Clown

Required courses outside of Conservatory include:

You continue in specialized musical theatre:

› Musicianship › Private voice and piano › Musical Theatre Dance Styles › Tap › History of the American Musical Theatre

› Acting techniques › Audition › Dance › Private voice

The Webster University directing program combines elements of each area in the Conservatory to provide students with a well-rounded theatre background. Classroom work is supplemented by real-life experience, with Conservatory directors assisting on a production at Repertory Theatre St. Louis, a nationally recognized LORT (League of Resident Theatre) organization. Combined with a senior semester on one of Webster’s international campuses, the directing program provides a fertile environment of learning for the student director.

Directors are storytellers. As students of directing begin their journey toward a career in theatre, the coursework at Webster vigorously stresses the craft of directing, while providing opportunities for each student to discover the stories they want to tell. The road to professional directing is a long one. Throughout their career in Conservatory, directing students will study directing, acting, design, and stage management. In their final semester, students will direct a capstone project. Webster provides the opportunity for students to emerge as leaders and sets them on the journey toward a professional career in directing.

You join the casting pool and are now eligible to perform in the Conservatory season.

Musical Theatre students have the opportunity to present a solo Cabaret performance, and, in Spring semester, present in Senior Showcase!

Scene III: Application Work in contrasting styles becomes even more ambitious. Skills you acquired in years one and two are applied to:

› Shakespeare › Restoration › Edwardian drama

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Stage Management

Design: Scenery, Costumes, Lighting, Sound, Wigs/Makeup

Stage managers work on every phase of a production process, from prep to closing night. That projection/lighting/moving turntable sequence you thought was so cool at the last live production you saw? The stage manager says the words to make that happen. The latest virtual production you took in from your home? There’s a stage manager watching every monitor and making sure everyone’s camera turns on at exactly the right moment. A stage manager is a skilled leader who knows what to say, when to say it, and how to say it. Stage managers facilitate communication between directors, choreographers, writers, designers, actors, office staff, and other collaborators. Stage managers run rehearsals and attend meetings. Once installed in the theatre, the stage manager coordinates all production elements and calls the cues of the show for technical rehearsals, previews, and performances. After official opening, other creative collaborators will depart and the stage manager becomes

responsible for maintaining the production’s artistic integrity. As theatre makers continue to blaze new trails in the world of virtual performance and work toward diverse and fully equitable and accessible rehearsal and performance spaces, the leadership of a stage manager is more important than ever. The program at the Conservatory of Theatre Arts trains the next generation of leaders in the theatre and live events sector by blending classroom training with practical work on productions. Students receive instruction and one-on-one mentorship from industry professionals with a vast range of experience, including Broadway, off- Broadway, regional, dance, corporate events, and opera. Stage management students also have the opportunity to intern and assist on productions with professional companies in St. Louis and across the country. Through study abroad programs, stage management students can build a rich global experience.

The Conservatory is one of the few undergraduate institutions where all

Supplemental work in the Art Department in design and drawing classes provides a base for developing additional skills. During the second year, you work in your major area while developing other basic skills, including:

productions are designed by students. Faculty input on production work is strictly advisory. This practice allows you to acquire production experience necessary for your degree and provides representative samples for your portfolio. The combination of practical shop and stage work as well as conceptual work in the design studio creates a unique opportunity for artistic and professional growth.

› Design analysis › Costume production › Scene shop practices › Rendering techniques › Specialized drafting › Crew management

The Conservatory offers complete design training in the major areas of:

› Scene design › Costume design › Lighting design › Wigs/makeup design › Sound design

In the third and fourth years, you take studio units in design areas and practice your craft in production. In addition, you take units in acting and directing. Many students choose to study abroad at one of Webster’s international campuses or do an internship during their third or fourth year. Our partner institutions also provide opportunities for professional experience.

The program begins with a fundamental first year of experience that includes studio work in:

› Scenography › Drafting › Technical production › Visual history

And in March, fourth-year students participate in the Senior Portfolio Open House!

Canfield Drive

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Technical Production: Technical Direction, Scene Painting and Costume Construction

Theatre Studies & Dramaturgy

Dramaturgical practice underlies the program’s structure. Some people describe dramaturgs as structural engineers. Their job, after all, is to ensure that the architecture of a play is solidly constructed. Others describe dramaturgs as explorers, since a dramaturg ventures inquisitively into the new world that a theatre production seeks to create and discovers paths yet to be treaded. In truth, if you ask 10 theatre professionals what a dramaturg is, you may get 11 different answers. From conducting production research to nurturing new plays, from shaping production seasons to creating educational resources, the tasks that a dramaturg plays today are quite broad and often very exciting. Whatever their individual jobs may be, effective dramaturgs are linked by their abilities to analyze texts, their communication skills, and their solid understanding of theatre history and dramatic literature. Ultimately, the Theatre Studies & Dramaturgy Program is designed for students who: › care about the role that theatre plays in society › thrive on asking questions and pursuing answers › like the collaborative nature of the theatre process › enjoy writing and communicating ideas Interviewing for the Theatre Studies & Dramaturgy Program In addition to completing the Webster University admissions application, students who intend to pursue the Theatre Studies & Dramaturgy major must ( 1 ) submit directly to the program a sample essay from a performance, literature, or social studies class that highlights critical and research skills and ( 2 ) interview with the head of the program. Questions about either of these requirements should be directed to Patricia Gray Baygents, admission events coordinator, at pbaygents 80 @webster.edu or (314) 246-4216 .

Webster is a leader in innovative solutions to technical problems, with highly skilled professional mentors and up-to-date equipment providing production elements for three performance spaces. Our technical programs demand operations and craft of the highest standards. It is within this environment that students learn their skills. The first two years of the program parallel those of design (see page 13 ), to ensure a balance of studio course work and practical application. In the third and fourth years, technical students study:

At this point, technical students usually also work in internship programs with other theatres, manufacturers, and designers, or choose to study abroad at one of Webster’s international campuses. Each of our shops is professionally staffed by Repertory Theatre St. Louis during the day and by students in the evening. The Conservatory technical director and costume shop manager work specifically for the department. Members of staff from our six partner institutions serve as faculty in production areas. Our partner institutions also provide opportunities for professional experience. Students in the program, under the guidance of professionals, work to accomplish safe and efficient results of the designers’ visions. And in March, fourth year students participate in the Senior Portfolio Open House!

Twelfth Night

Webster University’s program in Theatre Studies & Dramaturgy challenges its students to analyze the content of performances as well as the contexts in which they occur. The program trains future theatre makers, educators, critics, and scholars. It also introduces other professional paths in the performing arts such as dramaturgy, play development, advocacy, and arts administration. With a study abroad component and the potential for double majoring, the program prepares students for global citizenship and individual excellence. It offers students with a passion for theatre a stirring anchor for an outstanding liberal arts education. Our curriculum encourages success in any field that values interpretation, critical thinking, exploration, and collaboration.

› Advanced technical production techniques › Materials › Management

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Theatre and the Space

Virginia Browning Mainstage Theatre

› An intimate atmosphere for a multitude of artistic activities, with seating for nearly 1,000 people › Home to the Repertory Theatre St. Louis, the Conservatory of Theatre Arts Mainstage Series, Webster University Dance Ensemble, and Opera Theatre of Saint Louis

Twelfth Night

Emerson Studio Theatre

› Located on the lower level of the Loretto Hilton Center › Flexible space that is constantly changing from mock proscenium to a total environment › Where Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents its Studio Series of intimate theatrical works › Where the Conservatory presents works from its subscription season

Ismene

Stage III

› Off-Broadway small proscenium-style house contains movable seating, modified thrust capabilities, and a traditional proscenium › BA candidates in Directing produce senior capstone projects in Stage III, a public series of fully mounted productions › Performance experiences of one-act plays and directing projects scheduled on Tuesdays are open to the entire Webster community

Loretto-Hilton Center

Theatre does not exist without space. At the Conservatory, the actor, stage manager, designer, director, and technician have the opportunity to work in a variety of spaces. The Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, funded in part by the late Conrad Hilton, is a luxurious arts complex containing two theatres, administration offices, two spacious dance studios with locker rooms, design spaces, fully equipped scene and costume shops, light and sound labs.

Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road St. Louis, Missouri 63119-3194 (314) 246-6929

Bomb-itty of Errors

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How to Audition

Acting and Directing Candidates For your audition (on Zoom), you will present two monologues of not more than three minutes total. The selections should be of a contrasting nature. Choose characters close to yourself in age from scripts written after 1930 . Monologues must be memorized and fully prepared. Do not plan a long and involved introduction to your scene. Simply announce the name of the play and character and begin. Do not select Shakespeare or classical pieces. Do not do extreme characterizations of body, voice, or speech to alter your own age, physical abilities, or mental health. The characters should be as natural, authentic, and close to you in real life as you can imagine. Do not use a dialect or accent. Use your own speech, even if the character would normally speak with an accent. Interviewing and Auditioning for the Directing Program Applicants for the directing program will also need to interview. At that interview, you will need to present: › Any materials that might demonstrate your work and interest in theatre (a promptbook, photographs, a videotape, photography, artwork, writing samples, or anything else you deem representative of your interest in the arts). › An essay with pictures. Using pictures and words, create a 750 to 1,000 -word essay on one of the following questions: › Pick a compelling story from your life (or someone you know) and describe how you would bring it to the stage. › What surprises/inspires you most about your experiences with live performance? Give an example of how you might create such a moment yourself. › Describe how you would go about sharing your passion for the theatre with children. Give an example of a project you could direct to demonstrate that passion.

Musical Theatre Candidates The audition will consist of the presentation of two monologues using the same guidelines and procedures as in the acting audition. In addition, you must present two songs of contrasting nature of not more than 32 measures each to provide substantial information on vocal quality and range. One of the songs must be taken from the “Golden Era” genre that spans from 1943 to 1964 .

Advice For Your Auditions

Props and Costumes Feel free to use a chair if you need it. Keep the number of props and costume pieces down to one or two at the most. Clothing Please dress in clothing comfortable enough to allow you to do your best work, while still maintaining a professional look. No gym clothes, nothing too tight or revealing, and no heels above 3 inches tall. Accompaniment Please have recorded piano accompaniment prepared for your Zoom audition with an external playing device. Production Programs Students seeking a portfolio review and/or interview for Costume Construction, Costume Design, Lighting Design, Scene Design, Scene Painting, Sound Design, Stage Management, Technical Direction, or Wig and Makeup Design should first apply to Webster University. Application may be made either through our website at webster.edu/apply or through Common App. After completing your application, you will receive an email with a link to submit your Audition Request Form and $ 30 fee. You will be contacted by Patti Baygents, Audition Coordinator for the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts, with next step information regarding how to schedule a date and time for your review or interview.

Ismene

Auditions/interviews are required for all theatre arts students planning to attend Webster University. Auditions for performance majors are held each year during the spring semester for entrance into the following fall session. Interviews may be scheduled during the fall or spring. We want to ensure a safe audition process for all our candidates and our faculty. We will necessarily adapt our traditional plans for auditioning students during the Covid- 19

Performance Programs: Acting, Musical Theatre, Directing All auditions will be virtual for the 2020–2021 academic year. Performance majors will be required to submit pre-screen materials through Acceptd. The faculty will review all submissions weekly. Once reviewed, students will be notified if they are invited to request an audition date with Webster University. We will open the application in Acceptd on October 1, 2020 . The submission deadline for Acceptd is January 30, 2021 . (Please check with Patti Baygents at pbaygents 80 @webster.edu if you need to submit pre-screen materials after this date.) Once you have received an invitation to audition, your next step will be to apply to Webster University. Application may be made either through our website at webster.edu/ apply or through Common App. After completing your application, you will receive an email with a link to submit an Audition Request Form and a $30 fee in order

crisis. All updates, including any new strategies for meeting students, will be detailed on our website at

www.webster.edu/fine-arts/admissions.php . You can also contact Patti Baygents, Audition Coordinator, for up-to-date information.

Patti Baygents Audition Coordinator (314) 246-4216 or 1 (800) 753-6765 pbaygents 80 @webster.edu

Although some the specifics here might change during the Covid- 19 crisis, we hope this general information offers you a sense of how we hope to engage with prospective students.

to select an audition date. You will be contacted by Patti Baygents, Audition

Coordinator for the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts, to schedule a time for your audition.

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Our Partners

Please note that, unlike performance candidates, students seeking to apply for our production majors are not required to upload any materials to Acceptd. However, if students do submit through Acceptd, their materials will be reviewed by faculty. If you have any questions regarding the Conservatory or the audition or review process, please contact Patti Baygents, Audition Coordinator, at pbaygents 80 @ webster.edu or ( 314) 246-4216 . At your interview, you will need to present a portfolio that showcases the variety and caliber of your work in fine arts or theatre. Such a portfolio might include pieces from the following: › Drawings, any subject and media › Examples of work in color › Drafting › Prints › 3 -D projects of any type › Actual theatrical design work, either for a production or a project › Photographs of projects › Evidence of work in carpentry, electronics, mechanics, scenic construction › Sound files Letters of recommendation from two persons familiar with your work should be included. Interviews are scheduled individually to allow ample time to review the portfolio and to discuss your experience and career goals. Friday mornings are preferred. Stage Management Applicants to the stage management program must present a portfolio that should include: › A one-page resume that has references and contact information › A curated sample of production work through all phases of production (prep, rehearsals, tech, previews, performances). Please compile this in a way makes sense to you—this can be by production or by category, as long as it is organized and clearly laid out.

› Your materials should showcase your best work and give an idea of the scope of shows you have worked on. It is okay to pull a cast list from one production, a calendar from another, blocking sheets from a scene in class, etc. › Please remove any personal information such as cast email addresses and phone numbers. Please do not include any forms (such as emergency forms) that have personal or sensitive information. › Photos of productions or of yourself in action are great! › Letters of recommendation are fine to include but are not required.

The Conservatory of Theatre Arts has six professional partners. We are the leader in developing productive professional partnerships that benefit our experiential programs. Each partner works with us in unique ways to provide exposure to professional quality, practices and individual opportunities for experience. Our partners are all committed to the education and training of young artists.

Opera Theatre of Saint Louis Opera Theatre of Saint Louis is one of the leading American opera companies, known for a spring festival of inventive new productions, sung in English, featuring world-renowned singers and accompanied by members of the St. Louis Symphony. Opera Theatre of Saint Louis artists share performance and creative space with Conservatory students, in addition to providing master classes, internships, and employing students each season in multiple backstage roles www.opera-stl.org

On the Campus of Webster University

Important Notes about the Conservatory

Questions regarding auditions and portfolio reviews should be directed to the Office of Admission at (314) 246-4216 . Students must apply and be academically accepted to Webster University before audition results for the Conservatory are released. The Conservatory is a professional training program. Therefore, only students enrolled in Conservatory classes may audition for productions. Conservatory (CONS) class units are closed to students who are not Performance, Production, Directing, or Stage Management majors. Transfer students in acting or musical theatre need to complete four years of training in the Conservatory in order to graduate, regardless of previous coursework. Design/ tech, stage management, theatre studies/ dramaturgy, and directing transfers are evaluated individually by portfolio review/ interview.

Repertory Theatre St. Louis Since 1966 , Repertory Theatre St. Louis has been the St. Louis region’s premier live, professional theatre. Our innovative partnership inspired other theatres and programs to form similar relationships. With a mission that dedicates itself to excellence in producing an eclectic range of live theatre, The Rep is also committed to building and sustaining its vital connection with Webster University. Rep performers, designers, artisans, and administrators share performance and creative space with Conservatory from July through March. Students are assigned to Rep backstage crews, assist various artists, and on an individual production basis, audition for casting. www.repstl.org

In Partnership with Webster University

The Muny (Municipal Theatre Association of St. Louis) The Muny is the United States’ oldest and largest outdoor musical theatre. Each summer, The Muny enriches lives by producing exceptional musical theatre accessible to all. Since 2012 , Webster University and The Muny have shared a partnership that blends the renowned Muny theatre with Webster’s nationally acclaimed Conservatory of Theatre Arts. This partnership has provided many year-round opportunities for Conservatory students, including master classes, internships, employment, and casting in the season. www.muny.org

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Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty and Staff

Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre Our newest partner, the Lyceum Theatre is one of Missouri’s oldest professional regional theatres. Located in the unique Village of Arrow Rock, Missouri, The Lyceum is housed in a beautiful, intimate 416 seat theatre where Lyceum audiences truly are a part of the action. Each year, more than 33,000 patrons enjoy Broadway-caliber productions created by professional theatre artists carefully chosen

St. Louis Shakespeare Festival St. Louis Shakespeare Festival fosters

community and joy across the St. Louis region through the Shakespearean tradition of art for all. Its programming includes Shakespeare in the Park, an annual production in Forest Park and one of the most anticipated events of the St. Louis summer season; Shakespeare in the Streets, a grassroots theatrical experience that invites St. Louis neighborhoods to tell their stories; and TourCo, a stripped-down, actor- centric production that brings Shakespeare’s iconic texts to schools, parks, libraries, civic centers, and wherever people gather to learn, experience, and be inspired together. The partnership with Webster University supports opportunities for employment, internships, and casting. www.sfstl.com

from around the country. www.lyceumtheatre.org

Twelfth Night

Jef Awada ( he/him ) › Associate Professor, Movement › Co-Head, Performance Programs › BFA Acting, Emerson College › Certificate, Professional Training Program, Dell’Arte School of Physical Theatre › MFA Performance Pedagogy, University of Pittsburgh › Alexander Technique Teacher-in-Training › At Webster Conservatory of Theatre Arts since August 2006 › jeffreyawada 43 @webster.edu Jef is a director, movement coach, and teacher. His interest in diverse perspectives on movement training has led him to study traditional commedia dell’arte with Giovanni Fusetti, Suzuki technique with Yukihiro Goto, clown with Philippe Gaulier and Ronlin Foreman, and Russian scenic movement with Andrei Droznin. Prior to earning his MFA in Performance Pedagogy, Jef worked as an actor in New York and around the country. Highlights include: New Works festivals at P.S. 122 and The American Livingroom Series at HERE in New York City; co-founder/ performer/writer of Scary Little Town, an ensemble-based sketch comedy troupe;

Mr. Tumnus in Oregon Children’s Theatre Drammy award winning The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe ; Scrooge for the Traveling Lantern Theatre Company; The Wigmaker in Rashomon for the Pitt Repertory Theatre. His directing credits include Will Mr. Merriweather Return from Memphi s for the St. Louis Tennessee Williams Festival, Mary Zimmerman’s Arabian Nights and Romeo and Juliet for St. Louis Shakespeare Co., Fables for Metro Theatre Co., and Cloud 9 , The Insect Play , A Reconsolidated Life , Big Love , and Ismene at Webster University. His production of Big Love was invited to and performed at the Havana International Theatre Festival in October 2015 . As a movement director for the Great River Shakespeare Festival, Jef coached productions of The Taming of the Shrew , The Tempest , Othello , and A Midsummer Night’s Dream . In the classroom, he has designed and taught courses as varied as Acting for Animators at the Ringling College of Art and Design, Traditional Commedia Movement Styles for Russian students at the Shchukin Institute of the Vahktangov Theatre in Moscow, and red nose clown in New Delhi. Jef is in his third and final year of Alexander Technique Teacher training.

Variety Theatre Company of St. Louis Variety Theatre Company of St. Louis collaborates with Conservatory faculty and students on large-scale musicals using AEA and non-union adults and children with

differing abilities. www.varietystl.org

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Rapp on the regional premiere of The Metal Children ; directed Carson Kreitzer’s Self Defense, or death of some salesmen ; Laura Schellhardt’s Shapeshifter ; and Spring Awakening by Frank Wedekind. Favorite credits as a voice and dialect coach include: A&E Network’s Bonnie & Clyde: Day and Night ; Lionsgate Film’s The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia ; King Lear and Macbeth at Tulane Shakespeare Festival; Opus at Southern Rep; August: Osage County , A Doll’s House , and A Free Man of Color , all at Swine Palace. As a stage actor, favorite credits include: On the Verge (Public Stage); The Long Christmas Ride Home (Trinity Repertory Company); Sylvia (American Heartland Theatre); Richard II , Henry IV and Henry V (Trinity Repertory Company); Departure (Irish Arts Center); Twelfth Night (Perishable Theatre); Pride and Prejudice (Swine Palace); Two Gentleman of Verona (Trinity Summer Shakespeare) and Courting Vampires (McCormick Theatre at Brown University). Joanna is a proud member of VASTA, ATHE, and Actor’s Equity Association.

with some of the nation’s most prestigious regional theatres. Her favorite roles include: Cassandra in Trojan Women at The Old Globe, directed by Seret Scott; The Greek Chorus, in the World Premiere of Trevor Nunn and John Barton’s seven hour play, The Greeks , at The Alley Theatre directed by Gregory Boyd; Louise Marie Therese, in the Premiere of Lynn Nottage’s new play Las Meninas at Crossroads, directed by Daniela Veron; Elmire in Tartuffe directed by Garland Wright and Olivia in Twelfth Night directed by Penny Metropulos with The New York Acting Company; Olivia in Twelfth Night directed by Marco Barricelli at Shakespeare Santa Cruz; Aunt Cora in the World Premiere of the John Henry Redwood play No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs at The Philadelphia Theatre Company and New York’s Primary Stages directed by Israel Hicks; Titania in Midsummer directed by Michael Weller and Queen Margaret in Richard III directed by Jan Powell at the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival; Odessa in Water by the Spoonful directed by Christopher Edwards, Lady Macbeth in Macbeth directed by Darren Weller, Diane in Little Dog Laughed , Arkadina in The Seagull and Mrs. Muller in Doubt at the Nevada Conservatory Theatre. Other regional theatre credits: Arizona Theatre Company, Vineyard Playhouse, The O’Neill, Missouri Repertory Theatre and The Unicorn Theatre. Rayme is a private coach for professionals. Her speech and acting clients range from network news anchors and celebrity chefs to UFC champions. Rayme is also known for her extensive voice-over work. Rayme is a master teacher at the Don LaFontaine Voice Over Lab at the Screen Actors Guild Foundation in Los Angeles and New York. Rayme has represented such products as L’Oreal, Ford, Dunkin Donuts, Uber, Cingular Wireless, Station Casino’s, Singulair, Lifetime, WE, Oxygen Network, USA Network, MTV, VH1, BET, ESPN, History Channel, Discovery Channel, Republican and Democratic candidates and many more. Her greatest role to date is that of being Brick’s Mom.

Machinal

Joanna Battles ( she/her ) › Associate Professor, Voice and Speech › Co-Head, Performance Programs › BFA, New York University › MFA, Brown/Trinity › Certificate, Fitzmaurice Voicework™ › Certification, Yoga Buzz 200 hour, emphasis in trauma informed practice › At Webster since 2013 › joannabattles 07 @webster.edu Joanna is a professional actor and director, as well as a voice, speech and dialect coach for theatre and film. Since moving to St. Louis in 2013 , Joanna has worked as Dialect Coach at the Repertory Theatre St. Louis for nearly twenty shows. Favorites include last season’s Angels in America and Pride and Prejudice . Joanna has also worked as a dialect coach for several productions at New Jewish Theatre and St. Louis Actor’s Studio. In addition to serving as the Text Coach for St. Louis Shakespeare Festival’s Romeo and Juliet , Joanna acted in their Shakespeare in the Streets production of Ghosts of Maplewood

and directed the Educational Tours of Macbeth , Hamlet , Julius Caesar , and Romeo and Juliet . At the Conservatory, Joanna has directed Stop Kiss as well as Chekhov’s Three Sisters . In 2018 , Joanna completed her 200 -hour trauma-informed yoga teacher training from St. Louis-based Yoga Buzz. Prior to her position at Webster, Joanna served as the Co-Head of the Undergraduate program of Theatre at Louisiana State University where she taught Voice, Speech and Acting classes in the MFA and Undergraduate Acting programs; and was the professional Vocal Coach on staff at Swine Palace Productions. In addition to her work at LSU, Joanna was a faculty member and/or presented workshops at New York University, Playwright’s Horizons Theatre School, Brooklyn College, Brown/ Trinity Consortium, and Stonesoup Theatre Company. Joanna is an associate teacher of Fitzmaurice Voicework™, and a trained practitioner of Chuck Jones Vocal Technique. While at Swine Palace/LSU Mainstage, Joanna directed the new play, Elephant’s Graveyard , by George Brant; collaborated with Adam

Rayme Cornell ( she/her ) › Associate Professor, Acting

› BA, University of Nevada Las Vegas › MFA, Acting & Directing, University of Missouri Kansas City › At Webster since 2018 › raymecornell 08 @webster.edu Rayme has been a professional actor for over 22 years. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists and Actors Equity Association. She began her teaching career as an assistant professor in the Stage & Screen Acting program at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she taught Acting, Shakespeare, Modern Styles, Audition Techniques, and Voice-Overs, in the MFA and Undergraduate Acting program. Rayme was the host of the national award-winning PBS show Real Moms, Real Stories, Real Savvy . She has worked in film, television, Off-Broadway and

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