Mortgage Marketing Animals Issue 4

THE LOAN OFFICERS’ INNER CIRCLE

MEMBERS ONLY EXCLUSIVE NEWSLETTER

LEADING LOAN OFFIC RS TO FREEDOM

ISSUE 4

DON’T LISTEN TO THE LITTLE FELLA ON YOUR SHOULDER ASKING FOR BUSINESS VS. BEGGING FOR BUSINESS

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

3 | Create the Ultimate Team 3 | Script of the Month! 4 | Connect on the Internet 5 | What Freedom Means to Me 6 | Hiring & Sales Best Practices 7 | Learning From the Now 8 | Tool Time

All too often, I hear people telling salespeople, “Hey, stop begging for business.” I’ve always thought that whenever you hear this from someone, they’re either a lousy salesperson or they’re trying to sell you something. There’s nothing wrong with someone trying to sell you their services or product, but when they’re approaching it like this, it might be something that will hurt you rather than help you.

When I ask someone for business, I’m confident I can help that person in many ways and dramatically impact their life for the better. To me, when I ask for business what I’m really asking is, “Can I help you in a way I know I can?” In a sense, when I don’t ask, I’m being disrespectful to that person because I know I can enhance their experience. I don’t like to overuse the phrase “change their life,” but it’s something that genuinely does happen, as often as people change my own life. If we’re holding back on making an offer to someone because we’re afraid we’ll be “begging” for business or sounding “too salesy,” we’re not providing the service we know will ultimately help them. In the mortgage industry, if someone doesn’t come to our business, they’ll probably end up with a guy in the big-box banks. The loan officer they start working with might be so worried about hitting their quota that they put their clients into a program that’s not in the clients’ best interests, because they only want to hit their numbers. You and I know we’re looking

Some people don’t realize there’s a big difference between begging for business and asking for a sale.When I think of begging, I think of someone on their hands and knees pleading for their life, like in an old Western. Asking for a sale, on the other hand, is good salesmanship — something we call “closing.” I believe a good salesman thinks of selling as a great thing, while a lousy salesperson views it as unpleasant.

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